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Expanded target resolution comments sought please
Posted by: Ytcoinshooter
Date: October 15, 2016 10:06AM
My question is about the VDI resolution on the Racer2, especially to those who have used both the Red and the #two. I read all the attributes the R2 is supposed to have but need to hear from in field users with much time under their belts. Do you ever get foil, tabs or crown caps fooling you into believing the target is a higher conductor? The more detail you can give would be helpful. I liked my Red Racer for many things but not ID'ing coins.
Thanks in advance:thumbup:

Re: Expanded target resolution comments sought please
Posted by: Dave_E
Date: October 17, 2016 10:05AM
I read about the Iumping of targets into VID 81-82 that the original Racer did. That's one reason I preordered the Racer 2.

I don't get fooled into thinking foil, tabs, and caps are coins on my Racer 2.

I do get fooled into thinking they are jewelry though.

Re: Expanded target resolution comments sought please
Posted by: pasttom
Date: October 17, 2016 11:05AM
Its not fooling its a sad fact that IDing is not perfect and to date nothing will ID correctly 100% of the time. The Black is better than the Red and or Gold for sure. So many things are involved, but sound cues and experience (in general AND with the specific machine) greatly improve target ID assessment. But I don't know anyone who is right all the time. For me it is a guessing game I play that adds some fun to the hunt!



Pastor Tom
7 Minelabs, 3 Makros and a few others - rebuilding inventory
under the watchful eyes of my Welsh Corgi Sadie

Re: Expanded target resolution comments sought please
Posted by: csarebelva
Date: October 17, 2016 01:42PM
Depth, type of tab and even how old the tab are can change the ID reading. Usually if I find one in an area I am hunting I will know when I come across another but this is based on what I am hunting.

I know civil war bullets will ring in the mid 60s most of the time, Brass (depending on size rings from 50s for small pieces to 80s for larger size pieces. There is no perfect formula since an old pull tab with more aluminum in it does not read the same as the modern style tabs.

example - If I am hunting an area and come across a several 12 gauge shell (usually in the mid 30s) I will not dig other targets in that range if I am hunting coins or Civil War relics - since most of those relics come in much different ranges such as 50s up and most coins 60s and up. Now that being said I may bypass a pewter flat button that usually also comes in the mid 30s range or a modern nickle that I have also found is usually in the low 30s.

Much of it is sound also as usually a coin, bullet or button gives a nice clear solid reading with smooth tone .... a 12 gauge usually comes in a bit broken or with a iron grunt on the end of the tone.(that is with my tone set to break at 23)

Again knowing the machine and tones and numbers all working together is the best ID to use ...... but if a target sounds anywhere near good I am going to dig it until I start getting tired and then I get more selective in what tones and IDs I am going to dig. One thing is for sure with especially the Racer 2 ... if your a coin hunter you can pick them out and after several times hunting you can almost tell what the coin is before you dig it. I have heard many people live by ID numbers ...... don't live by your eyes and your ears and experience with the machine you are using and the ground you are hunting in.



CSArebelVA AKA Freddie Lee

Makro Racer and Makro Racer 2
Tesoro Ciabola
Makro Pinpointer
Lesche Ground Shark28" Shovel

Oldest coin 1662 Two Pence
Best Relics Washington Artillery Tongue and Wreath / CSA General Staff large with CSA in Shield / Manuscript I Button

Re: Expanded target resolution comments sought please
Posted by: Furious T
Date: October 17, 2016 02:45PM
I have the red Racer and the Racer 2. As I live (and hunt) in Australia, my experience with coins has been slightly different to experiences in the US. I was a bit surprised when, with the red Racer, our $1 and $2 coins registered the same ID number, yep, 82. Not a great problem because I would dig a $1 as readily as I would a $2. Our other coins were spread out a bit more, and so it was just a matter of learning which numbers related to which coins.

The Racer 2 has the coins spread out over a much larger scale, and that is good.

However, as far as targets themselves go, I rely on: a) the audio signal; and b) how steady the ID number is when registering the target. These qualities are very good on both machines, no matter what the numbers might be.

With the Racer 2, using 2 tones, coins and such like give a very good signal...the reading can jump a bit sometimes, and I put this down to the angle at which the coin is lying in the soil...this can also make pinpointing confusing, as you might get the right ID number several inches away from where the target is lying, and directly over the target, the ID number is different.

I have found gold with both machines (in the ground); in all cases, the quality of the audio signal and the steadiness of the visual ID were important in my decisions to dig, even though, in all cases the numbers did not relate to anything I knew.

I have not used all the features on either machine yet, and I hope to do so over the next year or so......they are both very good machines, and I use both of them with a different sized coil on each. Hope this helps.

Bruce, here are my thoughts on the target resolution differences you ask about.
Posted by: Monte
Date: October 17, 2016 04:29PM
Quote
Ytcoinshooter
My question is about the VDI resolution on the Racer2, especially to those who have used both the Red and the #two.
I worked the Racer for 11 months before I got the Racer 2 in-hand, and have compared them, as well as the target resolution differences between my Nokta FORS CoRe and Relic models. Both the Racer (original) and CoRe have the same ferrous/non-ferrous VDI numeric break-point at '40' (as do the FORS Gold + and Gold Racer) so it has been interesting to see h ow the differences apply, especially when working typical Coin & Jewelry Hunting sites and the more modern trash they tend to have.


Quote
Ytcoinshooter
I read all the attributes the R2 is supposed to have but need to hear from in field users with much time under their belts.
I have put in a lot of field time, mainly Relic Hunting whenever the weather is favorable and site access allowable, but this time of year (typically October thru March) I change most adventurous jaunts to Coin & Jewelry Hunting locations. Some older sites get hunted with older coin potential, but the bulk are more-or-less the typical urban park, school, sports field, and similar types of sites.


Quote
Ytcoinshooter
Do you ever get foil, tabs or crown caps fooling you into believing the target is a higher conductor?
Okay, let's first look at the three specific targets you mentioned as they relate to "fooling me/us" as being a "higher conductive" target.

Foil ... Generally, foil material falls in the lower end of the non-ferrous conductivity range. That said, it will depend on the type of foil we encounter, the thickness of the foil, the size and shape of the foil, and if man has further altered it from how they made it by wadding it up into a tight ball of foil. A foil gum wrapper, even balled-up, is usually less conductive than the same type of foil (thickness and blended make-up) that is from a larger candy wrapper or something like from a cigarette package and other bigger foil. Just like silver dimes reading higher than a half-dime, and silver quarters reading higher than silver dimes, and silver halves yet higher but all falling short of a silver dollar, yet all of those silver objects are made of 90% silver and are of a round shape. Just different thicknesses and widths.

So, because most foil is lower in the non-ferrous conductivity range, it is usually going to produce a more tell-tale lower VDI numeric TID read-out and not respond as a higher-conductive target.

Tabs ... Again, we have a lot of differences in the size, shape and type of 'tab' we might encounter, or parts there-of. There were the 'original' old "Ring-Pull" tabs that were two parts, the beaver-tail tab and the ring portion, and they were made of different sizes, shapes and alloy content. I gathered a bunch up at a city park in Prescott, AZ just before I taught a one-week class on Recreational metal Detecting at Yavapai College, and I sorted through the various broken apart beaver-tails, rings and the complete ring w/tail using a White's 5900 Di Pro SL to put them in their order of conductivity based on the excellent needle meter display.

Naturally all of the ring & tail pieces were not straight but had the beaver-tail tabs bent over or bent around and through the ring portion. When finished, I numbered them in the order of numeric read-out and had 26 different ring-pull type 'tabs'; or parts of ring-pull tabs. Their VDI read-out ranges from just a little below the US 5¢ coin reading, and similar to the 'nickel' coin and on up into what they used to refer to as the 'Tab' range on the TID display. The labeled 'Tab' zone, pretty wide and starting just above the US nickel reading, was more for the various complete ring & tab pieces of those 'original' ring-pull tabs..

Then we have all of the more modern Pry-Tab types of 'tabs' . You know, the common rectangular shaped pieces that are supposed to stay attached to the beverage cans. The ones that quite often have a numeric TID that is almost an exact read-out of the US 5 ¢ coin. But not all of them fall in the lower-conductive coin range. I have one in a holder I keep in my shirt pocket that reads exactly like most common modern Zinc 1¢ coins. With every make and model detector, to include those with an XP Deus or Minelab CTX-3030.

So, Yes, there are some 'tabs' that are going to fool any of us with any make or model detector. Partly because they produce a numeric VDI read-out similar to a coin or other wanted target, and also because when in the ground, the ground mineral make-up, combined with their alloy content, depth, and orientation/position to the search coil, can result in in an errant reading that could be up-scale or down-scale from what a nice-and-proper 'air test' reading would be.

Crown Caps ... Yes, those old pry-off bottle caps are going to fool a lot of people most of the time, but that's due to the nature of these man-made, ferrous-based annoyance targets. It will depend on the operator's skill level, the search coil and settings used, and the search mode used, but high percentage of the time I can audibly 'classify' most bottle caps as being a likely hunk of iron/ferrous material. That is accomplished by using 'EPR' (Edge-Pass Rejection) techniques that I have used since '71 and have taught to friends, customers, and folks who attend my seminars.

Nothing is going to be 100% other than target removal and taking a look at it, but in the right hunt conditions, such as working old picnic groves and other popular places where bottle caps were often discarded, my success rate is at least 95% in bottle cap classification so I don't dig them. Can the detectors help identify such likely problem targets? Indeed they can, and I like to use the 3-Tone search mode most of the time in sites where bottle caps are frequently encountered.

Bottle caps will often produce a higher numeric TID read-out, anywhere from a US 1¢ to 25¢ coin range, but can also be rather erratic and jumpy rather than a more solid lock-on. Also, it is typical for most DD coil performance to have trouble with bottle caps compared with similar-size Concentric search coils, but detector digital electronic design can help deal with that using the right detector.


Quote
Ytcoinshooter
The more detail you can give would be helpful. I liked my Red Racer for many things but not ID'ing coins.
Thanks in advance:thumbup:
The original Racer did tend to lump many higher-conductive coins at or near the '82' TID read-out and I know that bothered some traditional Coin Hunters working many average urban coin-loss sites. I have spent so much time Coin Hunting through the years that I am well aware that there are just too many variables that can effect the read-out of coins as well as non-coin/trash objects. As I state at the bottom of all my posts: "Your EYES ... the only 100% accurate form of Discrimination!"

The more we rely heavily on a detector's ability to Discriminate targets, or almost beg for highly accurate audio or visual Target ID, the fewer good targets we are going to find due to them not reading correctly, or because they have been masked by being too close to rejected trash. I have dug more than my share of junk through the decades I have been enjoying this great sport, but that has also resulted in me making a lot of very good finds that I might have otherwise walked over or past.

That said, while the Racer is a terrific bargain on the market today and preforms well, I really like my Racer 2 much more due to the added adjustment functions, and for the broader non-ferrous TID range of the display. It all adds up to why the Racer 2 is my primary-grab urban Coin & Jewelry Hunting detector in my travel units.

Monte



"Your EYES ... the only 100% accurate form of Discrimination!"

Stinkwater Wells
Trading Post

Metal Detector Evaluations and Product Reviews
'How-To' help for Coin & Jewelry Hunting, Relic Hunting and Useful Techniques.

My Regular-Use Detectors:
Nokta:
Impact, FORS Relic and FORS CoRe (Using mainly the 'OOR', 5", 4X7½, 5X9½ open-frame DD's or 7" Concentric coils as needed. Other coils on-hand.)
Tesoro:
Vaquero, Silver Sabre µMAX and Mojave (With either a 6" or 7" Concentric coil in use, or maybe 8X11 DD on the Vaquero.)

Other Specialty Use Detectors from:
Compass, Makro, Nokta, Tesoro and White's
Note: Detectors are listed alphabetically by Brand, NOT in my order of preference for use. Additional search coils on-hand in accessory bags.

Pinpointers: Using Nokta and Makro Pointers.
Headphones: Using the Killer B 'Hornet'.

*** All working well today to make memories for tomorrow. ***

monte@stinkwaterwells.com .. or .. monte@ahrps.org
(503) 481-8147


Re: Expanded target resolution comments sought please
Posted by: hairymonsterman
Date: October 19, 2016 05:00AM
https://youtu.be/Vq6hMA9pJAg


In my ground (3-4 bars on the R2) the screen ID was next to useless over 5" as are many other detectors, and with UK hammered silver and even later small pre decimal silver falling into the foil range it struggled bad. The reason was it would high tone off the edge of iron and high tone on coke and with no reliable screen ID you were digging unwanted items too often, even good targets would have a scratch to the audio unless they were shallow.

In good ground it does lots better, but it just doesn't get mineralised ground, a perfect example is the video above, watch how it struggles on the mineralisation test compared to the Golden Mask 4 which excells.

Re: Expanded target resolution comments sought please
Posted by: Dave_E
Date: October 19, 2016 09:22AM
Quote
hairymonsterman
In my ground (3-4 bars on the R2) the screen ID was next to useless over 5" as are many other detectors...In good ground it does lots better, but it just doesn't get mineralised ground...

hairymonsterman,
Have you tested the R2 in Beach Mode? That is really supposed to help with highly mineralized ground.

Re: Expanded target resolution comments sought please
Posted by: hairymonsterman
Date: October 20, 2016 03:36AM
Quote
Dave_E
Quote
hairymonsterman
In my ground (3-4 bars on the R2) the screen ID was next to useless over 5" as are many other detectors...In good ground it does lots better, but it just doesn't get mineralised ground...

hairymonsterman,
Have you tested the R2 in Beach Mode? That is really supposed to help with highly mineralized ground.

Yes Dave, i did try it but it seemed less sensitive, must be more filtering going on in beach mode, anyways i sold it on as it wasn't doing it for me.
I think many of the high gain detectors that air test massive depths work best in good ground as their just boosting the faint audio signals but on poor ground they lose more depth than other detectors that may air test 4"or 5" less, i feel in poor ground the output signal hits a dead stop at some point, if it's say 10" then turning up the gain won't make it any deeper.

avatar
Re: Expanded target resolution comments sought please
Posted by: Cal_Cobra
Date: October 22, 2016 02:23PM
Wouldn't it be something if Makro/Nokta made a machine where WE could select the target resolution! Searching for gold, expand the bottom to mid end , tighten up the top end. Searching for silver and copper, expand the upper range and tighten up the mid/low end.

Then again, I'm learning to hunt more by tones then TID, but still, could be an incredible feature for the right situations!

avatar
Re: Expanded target resolution comments sought please
Posted by: Southwind
Date: October 22, 2016 03:04PM
Having used both the Red and now the R2 all I can say is after 5" all bets are off. Even using the edge of the coil will fail.



The real treasure is in the hunt...

avatar
Re: Expanded target resolution comments sought please
Posted by: Stoof-tabsallday
Date: November 04, 2016 03:13PM
Quote
hairymonsterman
https://youtu.be/Vq6hMA9pJAg


In my ground (3-4 bars on the R2) the screen ID was next to useless over 5" as are many other detectors, and with UK hammered silver and even later small pre decimal silver falling into the foil range it struggled bad. The reason was it would high tone off the edge of iron and high tone on coke and with no reliable screen ID you were digging unwanted items too often, even good targets would have a scratch to the audio unless they were shallow.

In good ground it does lots better, but it just doesn't get mineralised ground, a perfect example is the video above, watch how it struggles on the mineralisation test compared to the Golden Mask 4 which excells.
Just for good measure, double check your isat setting in all metal. Kieth southern has a video where he had the r&d version and his production version were displaying different mineralization bars and the one reading 4 had his isat set too high and when he turned it down it somehow fixed the issue. He said one of the nokta/makro guys told him to check it.
After that even in his bad soil it was only reading 1-2 bars.
https://youtu.be/Cz9yP3adNQw
Here it is. Enjoy :-)



Stefan (Michigan)

Nokta Fors Relic 7x11", 5.5x10"DD, 5", 5.5x10 Concentric


Makro Racer 2 - 7x11", 5.5x10", 5" DD


:tesoro: Mojave
:tesoro: Deleon - Troy shadow super 7",
:tesoro: Compadre 8
:tesoro: Compadre 5.75
:tesoro: Bandido II Micromax
:tesoro: Outlaw
:tesoro: Cibola- GB/all metal toggle mod
:tesoro: Vaquero
:tesoro: Cutlass Micromax 8

Lots of coils

*Not listed in any special order*

Tools:
Garrett carrot, lesche shovel, Killer B Wasps, my bare hands



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 11/04/2016 03:16PM by Stoof-tabsallday.

Just some supporting and clarification comments.
Posted by: Monte
Date: November 06, 2016 04:20PM
Quote
hairymonsterman
In my ground (3-4 bars on the R2) the screen ID was next to useless over 5" as are many other detectors, ...
As has been discussed, 3-4 bars (or any bars) of MMI read-out will be most accurately determined with an All Metal mode iSAT setting of '0'.

So if your iSAT is set low, and you get a 3-4 bar readout of MMI when bobbing your search coil over metal-free ground, then yes, you are dealing with some higher iron ground contamination. However several other things need to be considered, such as what was the Ground Balance or Ground Phase read-out for that ground as well?

You didn't state the particular search Mode used, the Gain level used, or the Discriminate level used, and all of those can play together to get the best performance out of a detector. And you correctly stated the visual Target ID display was inaccurate on some targets over 5" in that soil, as are many other detectors. To that I will say that almost all other detectors are because these laws that are at work in electronic detection and signal processing of metal targets will be skewed by outside reasons such as depth, target orientation, nearby masking targets, and ground mineral make-up and dry-to-wetted conditions.


Quote
hairymonsterman
... and with UK hammered silver and even later small pre decimal silver falling into the foil range it struggled bad. The reason was it would high tone off the edge of iron and high tone on coke and with no reliable screen ID you were digging unwanted items too often, even good targets would have a scratch to the audio unless they were shallow.
Regardless of make or model, when you have any targets, such as UK hammered silver and smaller pre-decimal silver falling in the "foil range" (meaning both a lower-conductive visual TID response and a low-conductive audio response) it is the same for anyone anywhere else who also confronts challenging sites but is seeking lower-conductive targets.

In the USA we have coins such as thin silver 3¢ pieces, Nickel-based 3¢ pieces, and even some that read in a more scattered fashion above the US 'Nickel' or 5¢ piece and up to our modern Zinc Cent, such as the Flying Eagle and very early Indian Head 1¢ coins, the latter revised size and content Indian Head 1¢ from late 1864 to 1909, and our early Wheat-back 1¢ coins from 1909 to about the 1920 era. We also look for small buttons and pieces of uniform insignia and many other targets that can produce a lower-than anticipated response.

You also commented: "it would high tone off the edge of iron and high tone on coke " and that makes me wonder if you were using the 3-Tone search mode and not one of the 2-Tone search modes? You followed that with: "and with no reliable screen ID you were digging unwanted items too often" which is also pretty common with any detector where good-and-bad / desired-and-undesired targets happen to share the same or similar Target ID responses, especially with a visual display. I wonder because the 3-Tone mode is the one I use most often for urban Coin & Jewelry Hunting where there is a lot of modern trash, but it is also the mode I most often use for Relic Hunting remote places where there is a lot of discarded junk, especially nails and other iron junk, especially flat-iron.

The 3-Tone audio helps to 'classify ' a lot of the iron trash I encounter, and it does that by producing the Low-Tone Iron Audio just prior to, just after passing, or on both sides of a ferrous target most of the time, and this "processed audio" in the 3-Tone mode seems to be most useful when using a smaller-size search coil and working areas that are trashier, or those where most desired targets are likely to be shallower, such as 5"-6" or less. I personally never use the standard 7X11 DD coil w/3-Tone when hunting more open areas or sparse-target areas because any of the 2-Tone modes have the ability produce better depth-of-detection and a cleaner non-ferrous target response..


Quote
hairymonsterman
In good ground it does lots better, but it just doesn't get mineralised ground, ....
Yes, in favorable ground conditions the Racer 2, like most detectors, can do better than hunting in more challenging ground mineral conditions. That said, I happen to live in very mineralized ground area, and places I go Relic Hunting are just as bad or even worse than where I live, and the Racer 2, like my other preferred detectors, handles this highly mineralized ground quite well.


Quote
hairymonsterman
... a perfect example is the video above, watch how it struggles on the mineralisation test compared to the Golden Mask 4 which excells.
The video you provided was a link to the Golden Mask Pro 'basic test' evaluation, and it 'Passed' all 10-out-of-10 tests that ZiggyJinx did. I am not sure about all the settings he used, however, such as where the Gain/Sensitivity was set. I believe I saw enough Disc. notch rejection bars to guess that he used a Discrimination (ID Filter) setting of at least '4' and possibly '5' or '6', but not sure where he had the iSAT setting or the MMI read-out for his "test tote" of material.

I generally run the Racer 2 with a Discrimination/ID Filter setting of '3' and rely on using the Iron Audio Volume to reduce the iron tone range response loudness. He might have used a setting of '4' which is just a little high for me in some types of iron nails and trash. I could only see the Disc. segments at the top of the display on an angle, and you get a segment for every two numbers you increase, so I am guessing it was set at '4' or just a bit more.

Let me add here the link to Ziggy Jinx's 'basic test' of the Makro Racer 2, and a reminder that the Golden Mask Pro is a model that is audio only w/o any visual TID. Therefore the Racer 2 should be compared with the Golden Mask for audio responsiveness, and you will note that you hear it, and he states, it also got all 10-out-of-10 tests. In addition, it did display some visual TID

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7kOla9tkfnQ

Oh, I'll also add the other things I have noticed about Ziggy's video testing and Keith S.'s video linked to by 'Stoof' in his response. In the Ziggy Jinx 'test tote' he has a mixture of soil and the Racer 2 showed a Ground Balance setting of '72' but I don't know the fractional part of the number, nor the MMI read-out based on whatever iSAT setting he used. The "Highly Mineralized Brick" he used had a balance point of 84.80 but still seemed a little off (positive) due to the intensity and likely the Gain setting. I would have manually tweaked the GB closer to spot-on.

In Keith's video, which he did to point out how to get the more accurate MMI read-out by using a minimum iSAT setting, he Ground Balanced over about the same spot of natural ground, perhaps a few inches apart between the GB maneuvers, and the Ground Phase read-outs were 83.80 and 85.00 which is notably more mineralized than the 'test tote' dirt matrix make-up Ziggy used. In addition, with the iSAT at the lower setting for a more accurate MMI, Keith was getting a solid '3' and '4' bars out-of-'5' which reflects a greater challenge. Also note that the 2-Tone search mode was used and not the 3-Tone processed audio mode. Using 2-Tone, especially with no flat-iron trash or only with an iron nail as a test sample, the audio response will be better than 3-Tone 95+% or the time.


Quote
Stoof-tabsallday
Just for good measure, double check your isat setting in all metal. Kieth southern has a video where he had the r&d version and his production version were displaying different mineralization bars and the one reading 4 had his isat set too high and when he turned it down it somehow fixed the issue. He said one of the nokta/makro guys told him to check it. After that even in his bad soil it was only reading 1-2 bars.
The "Nokta/Makro guy" he mentioned was Alper, the lead software design engineer at Nokta/Makro. Keith did that video sometime about mid-March and I was pleased to see it provide helpful information to curious viewers.

I had already been using my prototype Racer 2 at some Gold Mining Ghost Town sites where the bulk of the ground reads between '82' and '85' and I encounter several mineralized 'areas' or specific nasty rocks that have a read-out of '85.60' to '87.40' and that is coupled with an MMI of at least '3'-'4' bars generally, and '4' or all '5' bars of MMI in many places. I had my iSAT set at a few settings when I was first evaluating my prototype Racer 2 in January and quickly noted the need to use a lower iSAT setting in All Metal mode in order to achieve the most accurate MMI response in any search mode. Mine is often set at '00' and usually I run it at '01' for a little Threshold retune in All Metal and that still provides a more accurate reading.

The main thing I can say is the Racer 2, like the other Racer series and FORS series models, continues to be a very reliable performer in all the challenging ground environments I deal with.

Monte



"Your EYES ... the only 100% accurate form of Discrimination!"

Stinkwater Wells
Trading Post

Metal Detector Evaluations and Product Reviews
'How-To' help for Coin & Jewelry Hunting, Relic Hunting and Useful Techniques.

My Regular-Use Detectors:
Nokta:
Impact, FORS Relic and FORS CoRe (Using mainly the 'OOR', 5", 4X7½, 5X9½ open-frame DD's or 7" Concentric coils as needed. Other coils on-hand.)
Tesoro:
Vaquero, Silver Sabre µMAX and Mojave (With either a 6" or 7" Concentric coil in use, or maybe 8X11 DD on the Vaquero.)

Other Specialty Use Detectors from:
Compass, Makro, Nokta, Tesoro and White's
Note: Detectors are listed alphabetically by Brand, NOT in my order of preference for use. Additional search coils on-hand in accessory bags.

Pinpointers: Using Nokta and Makro Pointers.
Headphones: Using the Killer B 'Hornet'.

*** All working well today to make memories for tomorrow. ***

monte@stinkwaterwells.com .. or .. monte@ahrps.org
(503) 481-8147


Re: Expanded target resolution comments sought please
Posted by: Woodstock
Date: November 06, 2016 05:46PM
Are you saying that the Racer 2 is infallible and every time you dig a coin instead of junk now and then ? Even I can't say this about any machine because none have perfect coin ID ... Woodstock
Quote
Ytcoinshooter
My question is about the VDI resolution on the Racer2, especially to those who have used both the Red and the #two. I read all the attributes the R2 is supposed to have but need to hear from in field users with much time under their belts. Do you ever get foil, tabs or crown caps fooling you into believing the target is a higher conductor? The more detail you can give would be helpful. I liked my Red Racer for many things but not ID'ing coins.
Thanks in advance:thumbup:


avatar
Re: Expanded target resolution comments sought please
Posted by: Ytcoinshooter
Date: November 11, 2016 02:25PM
Thanks guys I appreciate the feedback. I know how to use the R1 and its limitations in my soil. The red racer became a specialty detector for me rather than a general purpose unit or coin unit. In iron, within it's depth limitations it was like a laser scalpel. There's much to like about it and I clue into tone ID first but the drop off beyond 4 or 5" for visuals is just less info to work with. There are sites where I dig everything but if I'm just driving around looking for places of opportunity to cherry pick the R1 is not going to be the only detector with me. I have had good success using the racer to go back over sites to see what I've missed. However in those places, having hunted them already knowing the types of trash and goodies to be found made a difference. I will be curious to see how the anticipated Nokta Impact is received here. I am a fan of multiple frequencies and know very well how to utilize all or a single frequency. My broad band units are different in that I cannot select a frequency but have learned there are places that they lock onto good targets when some other detectors are just seeing hot rocks. Of all the single frequency detectors I'm of the opinion that the F75 has pushed that envelope nearest the edge of "single frequency platform" capabilities.
Thank you all again -
HH - Bruce



The best treasures are the lasting friendships we make.
Current Arsenal = V3i - (U13", 10"D2', 6 x 10", 950 concentric, 12" concentric, 12 x 10" SEF, 5.3 Eclipse); Fisher F75 LTD SE, Surf PI Pro w/DF coil, Sea Hunter MK2 - both coils, Sovereign GT - WOT monster, Fisher CZ21 - 10", Excal 2 - 10" GGA's, remote PP; Garrett AT Pro - U13", 8.5" x 11", 5" x 8" & GGA phones.
Digging goodies since 1986.

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