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What big coil do you recommend for the Racer 2, and why?
Posted by: Dave_E
Date: November 28, 2016 07:09PM
I want a giant coil to hit some locations I've already pounded with the OOR and the 11x7 coils.

I'm leaning toward the Makro 15.5x13 because I like the brand, but what other big coils should I be considering?

I still need to be able to detect coin sized objects too.

For your wants and needs, I'd suggest
Posted by: Monte
Date: November 30, 2016 08:05AM
using the standard 7X11 DD that you already have. And you asked 'Why?" so I'll tell you.


Quote
Dave_E
I want a giant coil to hit some locations I've already pounded with the OOR and the 11x7 coils.
The 'OOR' and 5½" DD coils are excellent for hunting in and around metal structures, brush, trees, other confining conditions, and definitely when dealing with any type of metal trash. In locations with a modest amount of trash to deal with I like to use the 5½X10 DD coil. When hunting a large sports field, a beach, a large park, a plowed field, or any other site that has a lot of area to cover but meta, targets are few and well spaced (and that includes unwanted iron trash that most folks discriminate), then I opt for the standard 7X11 DD coil when my targets are typically smaller-size. I am referring to coins, trade tokens, bullets, buttons, and all sorts of smaller-size desired objects.

A "giant" or larger-than-stock coil should be considered carefully and for specific needs, such as searching for larger-size targets.


Quote
Dave_E
I'm leaning toward the Makro 15.5x13 because I like the brand, but what other big coils should I be considering?
I have tried a few larger-size after-market coils on various Makro and Nokta detectors and, for coin-sized targets, I wasn't all that impressed. Their performance was no better than the standard Makro or Nokta 13X15 DD coil.


Quote
Dave_E
I still need to be able to detect coin sized objects too.
The key consideration in this matter of search coil selection is the typical size, shape and alloy make-up of the targets you are after, and you have designated 'coins' to be the desired find. I evaluated a lot of different sized search coils from the time I started detecting in early '65, especially from more manufacturers starting in '71 when assisting a local detector dealer friend at his shop. I used to read many claims that were easily proven to be a bit errant.

When I worked for a once major detector manufacturer in '87, '88 and '89 I called this to their attention when I mentioned to the company president that their catalog had unmatchable claims. They offered a 12" coil as the next size up from their standard 8" diameter size, and claimed the 12" coil would get 20% more depth or greater, and their 16" coil even more. As I told him, it was easy to disprove their catalog statements and I set up a testing device to evaluate all the search coil performance. I used the more commonly lost US coins for comparison, the 1¢, 5¢ and 10¢ coins, but also added some 50¢ pieces, larger silver $1 coins, and a few 'relic' oriented samples of bullets, metal buttons and cartridge cases.

The key consideration were the more anticipated or most lost coins which are the smaller-size 1¢ and 10¢ pieces, especially the older silver 10¢/dime coins. The 8" coils, averaging many detectors and various Discrimination and/or mode settings could give a good 'dig me' signal on a small dime at about 8". If the claimed 12" coil would provide 20% more depth, that would be an added 1.6" so the 12" coil was believed to achieve just over 9½" on a dime, and the 16" coil, by their claim, even more. Some of the early claims actually read 20-30% more depth with a 12" coil which would leave someone believing they might get a dime at 10.4 inches.

Well, the 12" coil did produce slightly better depth, but not 20% or more on the smaller size coins. Only on the mid-size or larger coins of which there were fewer lost. The biggest coil wasn't really very good for coins, with a 10¢ coin and even a penny getting close to the same detection depth as the standard 8" coil. Improved depth with the bigger coils was best achieved when searching for bigger-size targets.

As I am wrapping up fifty-two years of metal detecting I can say I have found a few coins that I considered to be 'deep' but it hasn't been a routine occurrence. Of course, it all depends on what an individual considers a 'deep' depth to be, and that is also determined by the type of site they generally hunt. Maybe it has had coins 'displaced' such as where cattle or human activity has pushed them deeper when the ground is quite saturated and muddy? Maybe it has been caused by wave action on a beach? Tree growth and other natural causes can bring about 'displacement' as well. Plowing/farming practices cause a lot of 'displacement' and target-churning with every seasonal plowing.

Sometimes coins and artifacts end up located deeper due to 'deposition' such as a build-up of leaves, mowed grass clippings, erosion, placement of fill material, etc.

I also know that while there are still some older-use locations that still have some desired targets at 'deeper depths' (and to me that is anything over an honest 5" depth), I also know that many times people want to find older coins that they think are deeper, but in fact in most of the more commonly searched areas, at least here in the USA, those sites were well hunted during the hey-day of metal detecting all through the 1970's, '80s and '90s before the detecting interested waned. Even the latter '60s saw the start of it in many locations before things really started to soar by about '70/'71.

In short, most placed lack many older coins because most of them were found back then. There are fewer coins lost today because there is far less activity at the more popular locations, but there is a marked increase in trash and the types of higher-conductive trash we have to deal with than in the early days. And more trash means more target masking and you can't get deep coins in trashier sites, especially when trying to work a larger-size coil.

I have used the 13X15 DD coils for Nokta and Makro detectors and, when conditions were favorable with a sparse amount of unwanted targets to interfere, I was able to get about an inch or so on some smaller to mid-sized coins. That said, it isn't a coil I would want to use on a regular basis because the 7X11 gets sufficient 'depth' and is better balanced and lets me hunt longer and more comfortably. Any coil larger than the 7X11 is one I would consider if Cache Hunting, or when I am after artifacts that could be bigger sized, and it is especially better at depth in iron targets.

Experienced based opinions from

Monte



"Your EYES ... the only 100% accurate form of Discrimination!"

Stinkwater Wells
Trading Post

Metal Detector Evaluations and Product Reviews
'How-To' help for Coin & Jewelry Hunting, Relic Hunting and Useful Techniques.

My Regular-Use Detectors:
Makro: Racer 2 w/'OOR' or 5" DD
Nokta: 2-Impact's w/5" DD and w/5X9½ DD, 2-Relic's w/5" DD and w/5½X10 Concentric, 2-CoRe's w/'OOR' and w/7X11 DD
Tesoro: Vaquero, Bandido II µMAX, Silver Sabre µMAX each w/6" Concentric and Mojave w/7" Concentric

Other Specialty Use Detectors from:
Compass, Makro, Nokta and Tesoro
Note: Detectors are listed alphabetically by Brand, NOT in my order of preference for use. Additional search coils on-hand in accessory bag.

Pinpointers: Using Nokta and Makro Pointers.
Headphones: Using the Killer B 'Hornet'.

*** All working well today to make memories for tomorrow. ***

monte@stinkwaterwells.com .. or .. monte@ahrps.org
(503) 481-8147


Re: For your wants and needs, I'd suggest
Posted by: Dave_E
Date: December 01, 2016 10:03AM
Thanks for the wisdom Monte.
I need to get a few more inches of depth so I'm adding a larger coil.

Quote
Monte
I have tried a few larger-size after-market coils on various Makro and Nokta detectors and, for coin-sized targets, I wasn't all that impressed. Their performance was no better than the standard Makro or Nokta 13X15 DD coil.

Looks like the RC40 costs more, but is not a better performer based on your testing.

Since you've tested a few large coils, and their performance was no better than the RC40, what about weight, balance, and cost?

Anyone try the Mars Goliath or NEL Big?

For about $100 less I may just get the new NEL Thunder.

Re: What big coil do you recommend for the Racer 2, and why?
Posted by: taco77
Date: December 01, 2016 05:44PM
I have a Cors Fire 15" that gets more depth than stock on air tests. Haven't tried in the field yet. May sell so pm if interested.

Re: What big coil do you recommend for the Racer 2, and why?
Posted by: OlEGoatMate
Date: December 16, 2016 10:01AM
12 x 13 Cors Strike

I can hit a quarter at 10 inches+
Great seperation as well.

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