Findmall.com
 
 






20th Century Tales Forum


Welcome! Log In Register
Story's by TexasCharlie
Posted by: Royal
Date: August 10, 2009 05:49PM
Here are Charlie's Story's :thumbup:



http://royalottmar.blogspot.com/

INCREDIMAIL TECH SUPPORT SUCKS. IT IS TERRIBLE AND DO NOT SIGN UP FOR INCREDIMAIL!!

:usaflag:Groaning rocks
Posted by: TexasCharley
Date: August 09, 2009 05:35PM
Several years ago I was camping by myself in the topaz country in Mason County. That's all red granite country, & there is a lot of topaz up there. There are also sapphires & garnets in the creeks, but they are very small.

I was camped on one of the 'topaz ranches'--a lot of the ranchers make extra income by allowing rockhouds to camp on their places for a fee. I was camped next to a big formation of granite, well worn, with a lot of loose boulders in it. It was October, but it had been extremely hot for that time of year--in the 90s--for about 2 weeks. That night a norther hit, dropped the temp from in the low 90s just before sunset to the low 40s by midnight. I began to hear some of the most unearthly groans, moans, & squeals I ever heard in my life! I came out of that tent with a .45 sixshooter at high port. I didn't know what was out there, but I've got a lot of faith in a .45.

The sounds were coming from the rocks themselves! When the norther hit & the temp dropped so suddenly, the heated rocks began to contract. In scraping across one another they made those unearthly sounds. I later discovered you can experience the same thing--multiplied by a factor of about 10--at Enchanted Rock just out of Fredericksburg. That granite dome covers a full square mile--640 acres--& it's sort of like an onion. There is an outer layer of granite over the inner core. When the outer layer has been heated for a number of days & is suddenly cooled by a norther, that rock fairly screams!



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 08/10/2009 06:27PM by Royal.

avatar
The Indians considered Enchanted Rock to be a sacred place..................
Posted by: Kelley (Texas)
Date: August 09, 2009 07:14PM
There was a Texas Ranger, may have been Jack Hayes, that escaped the Indians by climbing up Enchanted Rock. The Indians would not follow him up the rock because they thought it was haunted because of the noises that it made when it was cooling off at night.

Did you ever find any Topaz in that area? I have been wanting to go up there and hunt for some, maybe camp over night. Kelley (Texas) :)

That would be something to witness for sure! I have never experienced it myself..N/T
Posted by: Royal
Date: August 09, 2009 08:02PM

(This message does not contain any text.)



http://royalottmar.blogspot.com/
INCREDIMAIL TECH SUPPORT SUCKS. IT IS TERRIBLE AND DO NOT SIGN UP FOR INCREDIMAIL!!

Re: That would be something to witness for sure! I have never experienced it myself..
Posted by: bossman
Date: August 09, 2009 08:36PM
We climbed to the top last summer, Big time workout for old fat boy. The view is unreal

Re: Groaning rocks
Posted by: TexasCharley
Date: August 10, 2009 11:36AM
It was Jack Hays. What happened was, he had a pair of Paterson Colts. Every time he saw a head appear over the curvature of the rock,he put a hole in it with his revolvers. It doesn't take that happening too many times before you run out of folks dumb enough to stick their heads up.

In that general area I have found not just topaz, but tiny garnets & sapphires, a chunk of silver nearly 99% pure, & tracings of gold & lead. There's lots of galena up there, which is mostly lead but has silver in it. I suspect what I found was refined silver from a clandestine mine & smelter, of which there were many in Texas prior to 1867. Most of the creeks have the garnets & sapphires--the biggest ones are about the size of a large grain of rice--& some have flour gold in them. Unless you've got an electronic concentrator the only way to recover flour gold is to amalgamate it with mercury & then boil the mercury off in a retort. You'll spend almost as much buying the mercury as you'll recover from the gold, & if you breathe the mercury vapor it'll eventually kill you.

That would scare me too!N/T
Posted by: Paul (AR)
Date: August 10, 2009 01:26PM

(This message does not contain any text.)


:usaflag:firewood
Posted by: TexasCharley
Date: August 06, 2009 05:39PM
My house was built in 1917. It was built to be heated with wood. There are 4 fireplaces--living room, dining room, & 2 bedrooms--& the den has a big woodstove in it. Though the house has central heat we don't use it much. Of course, I'm always on the lookout for wood, especially wood I don't have to buy.

I was driving around in Alamo Heights & Terrell Hills, 2 of San Antonio's most exclusive areas, admiring the beautiful homes. This was in summer, several years ago. I noticed a lot of the houses had cut wood stacked at the curb, so I started going up to the houses & asking what they intended to do with the wood. The San Antonio area towns had recently instituted a $50 fee for curb pickup of cut wood. When the folks asked me how much I'd charge to hault it off, I said $25--half of what they'd pay the cities. I filled my pickup bed with wood that day--& added $125 to my pocketbook.

The wood was mostly hackberry elm & Arizona ash, both of which are ideal for fireplaces, since they don't leave beds of coals in the hearth overnight. Both burn right down to ash. The wood was green, but since I've got about an acre lot I have room to let it dry. I was driving down Broadway, headed for a bookstore, when a BMW pulled in behind me & started honking. I thought maybe I had a low tire or something, so I stopped. The guy who got out of that car could have stepped out of a Brooks Bros. ad. "Hey, old timer," he said, "how much do you want for the load of wood?" Well, I told him what kind of wood it was & that it was green & would have to dry all summer before he could burn it He then offered me $100 for the pickup load of wood.

My folks didn't raise a fool. I took his money. I now had $225 in my pocket. Another hour of cruising around in the high-rent district & I had another load of pre-cut firewood & a total of $300 in my pocket. The catch is, every house at which I picked up wood had at least one chimney sticking out of it & some of 'em had 2. I have no question those people were buying firewood every winter, when all they had to do was stack the cut wood they had at the curb--that they paid me to haul off--behind the garage until it dried.:usaflag:



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 08/10/2009 06:27PM by Royal.

Easy way to make money.N/T
Posted by: Paul (AR)
Date: August 06, 2009 07:54PM

(This message does not contain any text.)


avatar
I have put up over 12 cords this year... I do not go through that amount.... I use maybe 3 cords in a season... I just like being prepared.. And mine is all larch... the best you can burn,I have foundN/T
Posted by: Mikie
Date: August 06, 2009 08:27PM

(This message does not contain any text.)


avatar
TexasCharley, that was a very clever way to make some money...........
Posted by: Kelley (Texas)
Date: August 06, 2009 09:21PM
Years ago, I cut through Alamo Heights when they were having one of those large trashing hauling days. Some of those folks were throwing away some good items and there were folks driving pickup trucks gathering up the good trash items as quickly as it was being placed at the curb. I suspect that most of the trash items ended up being sold at flea markets. Kelley (Texas) :)



"Try to live up to your dog's opinion of you!"

That was keeping your eyes open and clever. :thumbup:N/T
Posted by: Royal
Date: August 07, 2009 06:04AM

(This message does not contain any text.)



http://royalottmar.blogspot.com/
INCREDIMAIL TECH SUPPORT SUCKS. IT IS TERRIBLE AND DO NOT SIGN UP FOR INCREDIMAIL!!

Re: firewood
Posted by: TexasCharley
Date: August 07, 2009 10:11AM
We don't have any larch in this part of the world. For a stove, the best is oak, mesquite, or hickory. It makes coals. Most folks consider hackberry a trash tree. If your lumberyard sells 'whitewood' that's usually hackberry. The Spanish name for it is 'palo blanco,' which means 'white wood.' The Arizona ash grows very fast & is an excellent shade tree, but it has a short life. 30 to 40 years & it's done. Liveoaks, which in the deep South are called 'water oaks,' live forever. There's one at Rockport on the coast that's at least 500 years old. It's also one of the hardest woods in the world. At the Nimitz Museum of the Pacific War in Fredericksburg I learned that the main propellor-shaft bearings for nearly all the big WW II US ships were made of liveoak.

avatar
Thank you for the information Texas...
Posted by: Mikie
Date: August 07, 2009 10:55AM
Up here, in B.C., we have whole forests of larch. The best are the dead, standing ones... you can use them almost immediately. Larch burns hot..... and with virtually no ash. Hence no clean out of the fireplaces. You can mix it with nirch. That burns even hotter but the birch does leave a lot of ash.

Calm seas

Micheal



"A dog is better than me, for she has love and does not judge"

"Sometimes the things that may or may not be true are the things a man needs to believe in the most; That people are basically good; that honor, courage, and virtue mean everything; that power and money, money and power mean nothing; that good always triumphs over evil; and I want you to remember this, that love... true love never dies. You remember that. Doesn't matter if it's true or not. You see, a man should believe in those things, because those are the things worth believing in"

Re: firewood
Posted by: TexasCharley
Date: August 07, 2009 06:25PM
Both hackberry & Arizona ash make a lot of ashes, but iit's fly-ash--almost as fine as baby powder. The problem with green wood, especially green oak, is creosote. It builds up a lot of creosote in the chimney or stovepipe, & a chimney fire or pipe fire can be the result. I've got a damper on the stove, of course, but none of the fireplaces have dampers so a chimney fire could be a disaster.

One of the best ways to avoid that, believe it or not, is to toss a handful of ice-cream salt on the fire wihle it's flaming. Somehow that cleans the chimney. If you can get sea salt for a saltwater aquarium, that's even better. The ice-cream salt burns almost pure white, but the sea salt has a lot of different minerals in it. It burns in all sorts of colors. Back in the '40s & early '50s some catalog houses (like Johnson-Smith, not like Sears) sold' fireplace coloring powder.' You put a teaspoonful on your fire & you got 30 seconds or so of brilliant colors in the fire. That stuff cost maybe a buck for 4 oz. I'll bet it was sea salt.

Sorry, only registered users may post in this forum.

Click here to login