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I might have accidently found a Spanish gold mine that day............
Posted by: Kelley (Texas)
Date: June 24, 2010 01:24PM
With many of us having a mutual interest in looking for treasure or old things with a metal detector, I thought that you might be interested in reading the article for the link that I am posting below. The title is A SPANISH ARRASTRA in the WICHITA MOUNTAINS and was written by W. Eugene Hollon, an archaeologists living in Oklahoma.

Many years ago, around 1969, while attending college at Central State College at Edmond, Oklahoma, I spent some time down in the Wichita Mountains looking for Indian artifacts. After much research, I discovered that there was at one time an Indian village where the government had established a CCC camp during the 1930s. Upon further research at a later time, I found out that the Spanish had visited the area in the 1600s while looking for gold. They enslaved the Indians of the village as workers for a gold mine that they were operating north of the CCC camp. As a result, I came to the conclusion that there would be some Indian artifacts to be found in the area, just common sense thinking.

On one of the trips to the Wichita Mountains, I was exploring an area a few miles north of Treasure Lake when I came upon what might have been an old Spanish gold mine. At the time, I did not realize that I had stumbled upon a mine as per se and really had no idea what I had found. There was a hole approximately eight feet in diameter and went to the depth of approximately fifty or sixty feet. I also remember a man made round trench a short distance from the hole in the ground. Please note that I was looking for Indian artifacts, not an old mine, and also be advised that to me an old mine would have been a hole in the side of a mountain, not a hole going down into the ground. Up until this point in my life, I had no knowledge or interest what so ever about gold mining. After a few minutes of rest, I left the area and continued my search northward for Indian artifacts.

I had plum forgotten about this particular venture into the Wichita Mountains until I recently came across this link while doing some research on the Internet on a different subject. While it is questionable whether or not I had found a Spanish gold mine that day, I do think that it was a mine, but more than likely a mine from the mining activity that took place around the early 1900s. Exploring the Wichita Mountains was one of many exciting times in my life, many good memories. Kelley (Texas) :)

http://digital.library.okstate.edu/Chronicles/v034/v034p443.pdf



"Try to live up to your dog's opinion of you!"

Man, how many of us over that years have come close to treasure and will never know it?
Posted by: Royal
Date: June 25, 2010 08:44AM
I went on a trip to the Pheonix area a short time before I retired and met up with a guy that I used to work and dive with before he retired. He spent winters out there at the time.

This is what we found on a hike back into the Superstition Mountains one day. I had forgotten all about these pictures. One was a mine and the other sure looked like one :D Beautiful country in Feburary :D

We found some indian pictographs on one cliff face and some holes drilled into rock, probably by Indians grinding grain or Spaniards skulls:blink:

Tom was 80 when this picture was taken and still going strong. A dang freak of nature !












And don't ask me why over 40 people have read your post and were too busy to respond:shrug: Rude comes to mind :(



http://royalottmar.blogspot.com/

INCREDIMAIL TECH SUPPORT SUCKS. IT IS TERRIBLE AND DO NOT SIGN UP FOR INCREDIMAIL!!


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The holes going straight down were a surprise to
Posted by: George-CT
Date: June 25, 2010 08:58AM
me also. While camped in Ely, Nevada, the owner of the RV place let me take his quad and go roaming and they had put fences
around the old mine shafts and those all went straight down also.... Sure would not to want to be wandering at night and fall in one.
I bet like that guy mentioned, most of us don't know what we are looking at. Plenty of CCC camps still around... Quite a few in CT. one about 6 miles from me.... Same with the arrow heads Fred. You would more than likely go out there and find them, I would walk right over them. That keen eye in you and Mikie never developed in me...

George-CT

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Interesting.....Drives me nuts when we
Posted by: George-CT
Date: June 25, 2010 09:21AM
were out west about all the stuff I was not seeing way out back away from the tourist spots. The rock drawings really caught my attention in Utah..... I like the side arm in the last picture.... Looks like a great area to explore.... Quad or horse and a lot of free time would work for me out there......

Geo

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George, over the years, I wonder just how much we saw that ..............
Posted by: Kelley (Texas)
Date: June 25, 2010 10:14AM
we did not actually know what we were seeing? I never knew that mines went straight down into the ground until later research. Kelley (Texas) :shrug:

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Royal, is that a small dog or rabbit in the background of picture #4? :)N/T
Posted by: Kelley (Texas)
Date: June 25, 2010 10:16AM

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You may indeed have found a mine shaft Fred............
Posted by: Wayne in BC
Date: June 25, 2010 12:00PM
we must remember that not all mines were successful. The Spanish had the opportunity to explore an entire portion of an untouched continent, no competition and they had slave labor in the form of the natives and their own soldiers.

When miners find an area that appears to hold minerals they will follow the indicators, a vein of quartz eg and if it happens to be on a level area they go down in the form of a shaft. If in a hill or mountain side they follow it in, a tunnel or "adit" is nearly horizontal. Passages off this tunnel are known as drifts where they explore further for more veins.

The most common shafts going straight down are made by placer miners attempting to get through the gravel, rocks, and other overburden to get to the bedrock of a stream or river course. That is where the concentration of gold is, then they "drift" following the bedrock. The Yukon and Alaska gold miners have to deal with permafrost and used to work in tunnels where they had to keep fires burning to thaw the frozen ground. Imagine being down there with all that smoke!
In summer they had to keep the entrance closed or the permafrost would melt and collapse the gravel onto them.
They have found whole frozen Mammoths and prehistoric Horses in the frozen ground but no Spanish miners:wink:

Those Spanish pussy cats were not fond of cold weather and did little work north of my area and certainly not in Alaska:biggrin:
There have been Spanish mines and artifacts found here on the south coast of BC.

Fred this article of your is interesting and right up my alley! Thanks!:thumbup:



A liar will assume you are lying

That is one of Tom's ratty little dogs :DN/T
Posted by: Royal
Date: June 25, 2010 12:02PM

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http://royalottmar.blogspot.com/
INCREDIMAIL TECH SUPPORT SUCKS. IT IS TERRIBLE AND DO NOT SIGN UP FOR INCREDIMAIL!!

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Nice! Phoenix is the area to find old mines.........
Posted by: Wayne in BC
Date: June 25, 2010 12:08PM
that area has a huge advantage in that unlike here there is little vegetation (read rainforest) to hide the ore veins.
I can not stop myself from going into an old mine if it looks even a tiny little bit safe. Some people these days specialize in using a detector along the walls off mine shafts and occasionally find hidden veins that the miners missed, sometimes by inches!
I know a few guys who have done well in the old tailings piles from early mines where they "highgraded", just picking out the ore that had visible gold and leaving the rest, they missed a lot!



A liar will assume you are lying

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Can you get back Fred?? Of has it all been developed over??
Posted by: Mikie
Date: June 26, 2010 09:39PM
I have passed over a few of those opportunities too..

Never again

Calm seas

Micheal



"A dog is better than me, for she has love and does not judge"

"Sometimes the things that may or may not be true are the things a man needs to believe in the most; That people are basically good; that honor, courage, and virtue mean everything; that power and money, money and power mean nothing; that good always triumphs over evil; and I want you to remember this, that love... true love never dies. You remember that. Doesn't matter if it's true or not. You see, a man should believe in those things, because those are the things worth believing in"

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Mike, that site is in the Wichita Mountains in Southwest Oklahoma, near............
Posted by: Kelley (Texas)
Date: June 26, 2010 10:11PM
Ft. Sill and Lawton, Oklahoma. It is a remote area and I doubt if I could find the site again...too remote. Sorry! Kelley (Texas) :)

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Sure would be worth the trip Fred to see if you could find them.
Posted by: Bayrat76
Date: June 28, 2010 12:52PM
I found three flat sand stones in a ranch 30 years ago, all three have the same markings on them, I think they might of been early grave stones are markers. the site was marked with rocks in a square about 50 X 30 foot. All the stones were broke from cattle stepping on them. I found a old wagon wheel and fry pan about 300 yards from there. The ranch has alot of history too it. The new owner want let me go on it, He keeps dragging me out to get permission to hunt it. His step dad who we leased the ranch from would of in a minute. I did him a lot of favours the old guy, he liked we a lot.



BAYRAT76

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