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Stories by Mikie........
Posted by: Wayne in BC
Date: February 20, 2009 09:57PM
Thank you Mike:smile:



A liar will assume you are lying

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:canadaflag:Of Coal mines, prejudice and childhood..
Posted by: Mikie
Date: December 28, 2008 06:30PM
This is a very different story than I am used to writing. It will combine elements of history, sociology, generational bias and all round good kid fun. : I just finished re-reading a book called Boss Whistle



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 02/27/2009 01:38AM by Wayne in BC.




What a great story that I can relate to!
Posted by: Dan-MO
Date: December 28, 2008 07:10PM
Only in my part of the world it was lead mining instead of coal. Much the same dangers and labor wars....strikers and strike breakers with hard feelings that lasted for generations and are still going on today in some cases.This story touched home with me Mike. Thank you.

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Wonderful Mike! I have been there of course but........
Posted by: Wayne in BC
Date: December 28, 2008 07:20PM
unfortunately not as early as you.
My great Grandad mined coal in Nanaimo in 1887, and on Newcastle Island in later years.
Really enjoyed your piece of our history!



A liar will assume you are lying

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You ever read that Book, Wayne... If not, try to find it.. It is a great read!!!N/T
Posted by: Mikie
Date: December 28, 2008 08:33PM

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Dan.. Thank you for taking the time to read it...
Posted by: Mikie
Date: December 28, 2008 08:37PM
Funny how reading a book stirred up those memories.

And memories are VERY long in some areas of the country..

Sunny skies

Micheal



"There's no present like the time"

"A dog is better than me, for she has love and does not judge"

"Sometimes the things that may or may not be true are the things a man needs to believe in the most; That people are basically good; that honor, courage, and virtue mean everything; that power and money, money and power mean nothing; that good always triumphs over evil; and I want you to remember this, that love... true love never dies. You remember that. Doesn't matter if it's true or not. You see, a man should believe in those things, because those are the things worth believing in"


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Extremely tough life back then... One of the only
Posted by: Ron J
Date: December 29, 2008 05:05AM
two Uncles,( i have that are still alive) Uncle Clarence, his parents came from Lithuania, and settled in Pennsylvania,and became a coal miner. My Uncle, grew up there,and when was kind of forced to enter employment in the mine. He didn't like it at all, and joined the Navy, just before WW ll. He was stationed in California, met my Aunt Tillie ,out there. She had been visiting her sister. My Aunts were born and raised in Provincetown Mass. Anyway Uncle Clarence and Aunt Tillie got married in Cal. She got home sick for Cape Cod, talked her husband into visiting the Cape, and they never left! He started Provincetown Welding, which is still in business today! Although my Cousin Mike, runs it now. Uncle Clarence still dabbles with metal, to this day, he is in the shop. He is 93! He was a lucky one, making that decision, knowing being a Coal Miner was not gonna be his future.

Re: Of Coal mines, prejudice and childhood..
Posted by: Cupajo
Date: December 29, 2008 06:43AM
Thanks for the good read,

Enjoyed the tale. It is typical of mining even today in parts of the world.

Kids will be kids, always and sometimes we adults do learn from them.

Happy New Year,

Cupajo

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Morning Ron.. I can remember Jumbo, an old chinaman, telling us tales of the heyday of Cumberland, in my youth..
Posted by: Mikie
Date: December 29, 2008 08:12AM
As I remember, he did not tell us much about the actual mining... more about the life surrounding the mines.

Hope that your weather is better than ours.

Fair winds

Micheal



"There's no present like the time"

"A dog is better than me, for she has love and does not judge"

"Sometimes the things that may or may not be true are the things a man needs to believe in the most; That people are basically good; that honor, courage, and virtue mean everything; that power and money, money and power mean nothing; that good always triumphs over evil; and I want you to remember this, that love... true love never dies. You remember that. Doesn't matter if it's true or not. You see, a man should believe in those things, because those are the things worth believing in"


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Morning Cuppa.. Many thanks for taking the time to read it!!N/T
Posted by: Mikie
Date: December 29, 2008 08:15AM

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Thanks for the Excellent Read, Mikie. It broht back a lot of memories from my time in the Valley.
Posted by: bdahunter
Date: December 29, 2008 09:01AM
I lived in Courtney in the 90's and things only started to change a bit in Cumberland towards the end of my time there. Up until the time I left the Valley in 1998, folks still referred to the Town of Cumberland as 'Dodge City'. I remember a buddy of mine who was from Dodge City introducing me to a great uncle of his who was probably in his 80's at the time. This old timer had been born in Cumberland and spent his whole life there, rarely went into 'town' (Courtenay), had never been off the island and had been as far south as Nanaimo, just once back in the 50's. He said he couldn't get out of the 'city' (Nanaimo) fast enough and would never go back to such a crazy place again.

Times change but they change a lot slower in Cumberland.

Thanks Again,

Eric

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Morning Eric.. Hope that you are managing with all that whote stuff [sand :): ] on the ground.
Posted by: Mikie
Date: December 29, 2008 10:01AM
The more I think about it, the more I appreciate just what Courtenay was in those days. A safe place to grow up..... and really, it does not get any better than that for children.

Where did you live while in Courtenay? My home was the forty houses!! [any old timer can tell you where that is/was] However, I spent much of my time on my uncles farm out Tsolum way!!!

Fair winds

Micheal



"There's no present like the time"

"A dog is better than me, for she has love and does not judge"

"Sometimes the things that may or may not be true are the things a man needs to believe in the most; That people are basically good; that honor, courage, and virtue mean everything; that power and money, money and power mean nothing; that good always triumphs over evil; and I want you to remember this, that love... true love never dies. You remember that. Doesn't matter if it's true or not. You see, a man should believe in those things, because those are the things worth believing in"


Re: Of Coal mines, prejudice and childhood..
Posted by: montereymacgyver
Date: December 29, 2008 10:20AM
Excellent read Mikie....brought back memories of my youth in a copper mining town. We lived there during a strike that dragged on for years and crippled the community from both a financial and sociological aspect. Great story...
Rick

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Hey Rick.. Thank you for tking the time...:thumbup:
Posted by: Mikie
Date: December 29, 2008 06:21PM
Where were you raised that had a copper mine? . Once Jamie got to be accepted, he was just one of the gang and many, not all, of the community started to change.

Calm seas

Mike



"There's no present like the time"

"A dog is better than me, for she has love and does not judge"

"Sometimes the things that may or may not be true are the things a man needs to believe in the most; That people are basically good; that honor, courage, and virtue mean everything; that power and money, money and power mean nothing; that good always triumphs over evil; and I want you to remember this, that love... true love never dies. You remember that. Doesn't matter if it's true or not. You see, a man should believe in those things, because those are the things worth believing in"


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Good story Mikie. In the pictures that sure looked like
Posted by: George-CT
Date: December 30, 2008 06:54PM
a rough time to live there. For sure, thats when unions were the only thing a working man had to speak up for them. I know the scab trem well and its still used back east here.Walked many a picket line myself as did my father. My Dad was a union organizer for the Boilermakes and later the Ironworkers....

Have you ever gone back to detect where those row houses were on in the town. Gotta be a few old cooins around those parts.

Much like the Ellis family you spoke of, it happens here if you cross a picket line. Most contractors here now have strike clauses in their contracts. I only see them here now with new contractors who are not union trying to do a union job over x amount of dollars or federally funded.

Good story and pictures.

thanks for post.

George-CT

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