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Re: What Is The Average Depth Old Coins Are Found In Your Area?
Posted by: slingshot
Date: September 19, 2017 06:20PM
The hard packed soil in East Texas keeps them 3-4". Those in the 5-6" range have a dark red patina.

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Re: What Is The Average Depth Old Coins Are Found In Your Area?
Posted by: MarkCZ
Date: September 19, 2017 08:02PM
I'm sorry, but unless the soil is VERY muddy, or VERY sandy (like an Ocean beach) coins don't SINK!
Yea, I've even head the story about rain drops pound the coins into the ground to, only at the muddy surface.
If You take a 50 gallon garbage can and fill it with dirt and pack it pretty good, put a coin on top of the dirt, put a lid on it, water it a bit once a week and replace the lid
and your great Great Grand children continues the process that coin will still be on top of the dirt in 200 years! they don't sink!

I found a 1899 quarter at our park and it was about 8" deep my brother a year later finds another one in the same date range a few yards away with about the same wear on it, his was maybe an inch
in the ground, why the difference?
Mine was out in the open area, his was under something that had been placed over top of it just a few years after it was lost, he finds it 70 years later because of some work in the area and the stuff had been move off from it.
Mine was exposed to soil growth from leaves and grass trimmings that the park don't bag when the cut the grass, my brother's quarter was in the same area, for near the same amount of time but his wasn't exposed to the soil growth.

I really don't believe in coins sinking past soft mud, or deep moving sand!

Mark

Re: What Is The Average Depth Old Coins Are Found In Your Area?
Posted by: marcomo
Date: September 20, 2017 10:03AM
You're missing the biggest reason why coins sink, Mark.

Your garbage can of dirt scenario does not take into account living organisms. For example, think about earthworms and the tunnels they burrow in the ground. Eventually those tunnels collapse. A tiny collapse in the surrounding soil repeated over and over. Other organisms both larger and smaller are doing the same thing as those earthworms, creating pockets in the soil. The further down in the dirt you go, the less dense those organisms become because the deeper you go, the harder it is to access needed oxygen. Therefore, the rate of sinking is not linear. As the density of living organisms decreases, the rate of sinking slows.

Cover the ground with a structure or asphalt and the sinking is arrested because of no exposure to the oxygen organisms need to survive. That's why sidewalk tearouts in old locations can be so good.

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Re: What Is The Average Depth Old Coins Are Found In Your Area?
Posted by: dfmike
Date: September 20, 2017 06:47PM
The empirical evidence is right there in the links I posted above.



Active detectors: Fisher F19 LTD, Nokta Fors CoRe, Makro pointer and way too many coils.
Previous detectors: Bounty Hunter Discovery, Fisher F44, Omega 8000 V6, Minelab X-Terra 705, Fisher F5

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Re: What Is The Average Depth Old Coins Are Found In Your Area?
Posted by: REVIER
Date: September 21, 2017 09:18AM
I found a Barber quarter, a merc, a V nickel and Indians at 1-2", also other old coins much deeper.
I have found modern clad way deeper than where they logically should be.
Too much goes on out there that we never know about...dirt is moved around during construction or by plows, hard clay should stop coins from sinking much while nice loose moist black dirt might let them sink a bit more and even though I have observed this a lot sometimes these rules don't apply.
I don't care what the depth reading says...if I get good signals I just dig.
I have been surprised, and thrilled, more than once.



"What if doing the Hokey Pokey really IS what it's all about?”
F70, F2, Compadre, Mojave, Judge2 - 2017....Clad, 13 silver targets including a freaking Barber quarter, a beautiful walker and two V nickels...
Plus other cool stuff.

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Re: What Is The Average Depth Old Coins Are Found In Your Area?
Posted by: bigtim1973
Date: September 23, 2017 07:18PM
from 1 to 8 inches for the most part depending on soil conditions. They do not just sit there on top of the dirt. Out west coins are very shallow in the desert. Not much regrows through the top soil or lack there of to push them back down. They stay shallow.



Happy Hunting

Fisher F 75 SE Tesoro Compadre Teknetics Omega 8000

Re: What Is The Average Depth Old Coins Are Found In Your Area?
Posted by: IN DA HOLE
Date: September 24, 2017 08:55PM
I hunted a large forested park this Spring. I got a nice signal and swept the leaf litter away and saw what I thought was a bottlecap I swung over it again and it gave a very high signal that I rarely get from caps. I pick up a tarnished 1960 silver quarter sitting on the surface. I thought to myself thats really strange? I continued to find newer clad coins from different years also on the surface. I got down to see why nothing was sinking into the ground. What I found was surprising, for some reason the leaves never decomposed from the previous Fall season and apparently not from many years before that and were just dried up and loose on the surface and under the leaves was a carpet of super fine roots like a steel wool pad everywhere. I could barely push my digger thru it. Nothing ever sunk into the ground in this park all the way back to the 1960's and before. A couple weeks later I went back again to another side of the park about half mile away and found more surface coins including another silver from 1952. So all this being said there are certain conditions that can keep 50 - 60 year old coins on the surface. Big items like rusted chunks of iron I found under the root mass but lighter stuff like the coins,,bottlecaps, pull tabs stayed on top. All other parks in my area are normal where coins sink to varying depths.



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 09/24/2017 08:58PM by IN DA HOLE.

Re: What Is The Average Depth Old Coins Are Found In Your Area?
Posted by: enderman
Date: September 26, 2017 01:35PM
It would be interesting to know what type of tree that was.

In southern Canada we have a lot of different soil conditions, it's an area where the trees go from deciduous in the south to mostly coniferous. I have sandy moraines, or even solid granite with a few minutes drive.

Because of the lakes, historically, there can be clay in weird places. I have one site that has modern clay near the water 6" down, or you can go to other areas 20' away and encounter soft wetlands that would consume almost anything. At the highest point in town I can still find decomposing clay 8" down from where the water was 10,000 years ago.

In addition to the animals already mentioned, the yearly freezing and thawing cycle does cause the coins to sink in soil (and up on sandy moraines ), the ground breaths, it expands with the freeze, shrinks in the summer. especially saturated soils.
This action could additionally flip a lot of coins on edge. A coin on edge has a higher PSI and would sink faster then a flat coin. I wouldn't be surprised if a coin tumbles as it sinks through the ground over time.

Some forested areas have soft, loamy fluffy soil, perhaps with sand mixed in. I would speculate things here would disappear quicker, even if it's just because of the addition of rotting sticks and leaves over the years.

So if you can find areas that have a clay base, you will probably find that the upper soil is very clay-like compared to soils that are composed mostly of organic matter. These clay rich soils will hold the coins shallower, longer IMO, but that doesn't mean they are all shallow targets. They will still drop through the first 6" comparable to other sites.

Re: What Is The Average Depth Old Coins Are Found In Your Area?
Posted by: IN DA HOLE
Date: September 26, 2017 03:06PM
I to am also located in southern Canada. The park is within the limits of a City and it's mixed with mostly deciduous trees maple, ash, alder some cedar. Very little grows between the large trees there, Great place to swing and no poison ivy. Just a strange ecosystem that is only in this particular park.
The thing is it shows that some of the earlier discussions are valid. Coins don't sink by themselves just from their mass except at the beach, it is a combination of soil density, erosion, decomposition, freeze and thaw and other forces combined. In perfect conditions a coin could probably keep sinking until it hits gravel or bedrock. In my area I find older coins on the surface down as far as I can hear them, 10 + inches if I am lucky. Do they go deeper most certainly.



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 09/26/2017 03:10PM by IN DA HOLE.

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Re: What Is The Average Depth Old Coins Are Found In Your Area?
Posted by: Jason in Enid
Date: September 28, 2017 01:57PM
there is no answer to the question. there is no "average". Everything depends on the soil and what is growing in it. You can dig 100+ year old coins barely under the surface and 10 year old coins 8 inches deep. I have found that lawns with fast growing grass, and frequent watering will get coins down to about 6 inches really fast because they are constantly growing over the top and making a new layer. The oldest layers under neath are decomposing and turning back into the soil. After 6 - 8 inches, items really seem to stop moving very fast. You can walk across the street from that type of site to an area covered with heavy trees and no grass can grow. Old coins will be very shallow.

This changes from yard to yard, one part of town to another, and town to town. Every site it unique and cant be treated like "all the others". What makes this even more complex is freeze and thaw cycles. They can push things up, push them down, turn them.... and in droughts where the soil blows away.... flood deposits.... Depth of a coin is a crap-shoot.

Re: What Is The Average Depth Old Coins Are Found In Your Area?
Posted by: Rich (Utah)
Date: September 28, 2017 09:34PM
Quote
Jason in Enid
there is no answer to the question. there is no "average". Everything depends on the soil and what is growing in it. You can dig 100+ year old coins barely under the surface and 10 year old coins 8 inches deep. I have found that lawns with fast growing grass, and frequent watering will get coins down to about 6 inches really fast because they are constantly growing over the top and making a new layer. The oldest layers under neath are decomposing and turning back into the soil. After 6 - 8 inches, items really seem to stop moving very fast. You can walk across the street from that type of site to an area covered with heavy trees and no grass can grow. Old coins will be very shallow.

This changes from yard to yard, one part of town to another, and town to town. Every site it unique and cant be treated like "all the others". What makes this even more complex is freeze and thaw cycles. They can push things up, push them down, turn them.... and in droughts where the soil blows away.... flood deposits.... Depth of a coin is a crap-shoot.


2x


Rich (Utah)



* etrac * racer 2 * eq 800 * . . and others *

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Re: What Is The Average Depth Old Coins Are Found In Your Area?
Posted by: marcomo
Date: September 28, 2017 11:24PM
The total number of inches of all coins you dig in your area divided by the total number of coins you dig = the average depth. No matter the disparity between individual depths.

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Re: What Is The Average Depth Old Coins Are Found In Your Area?
Posted by: Jason in Enid
Date: September 29, 2017 11:06AM
Quote
marcomo
The total number of inches of all coins you dig in your area divided by the total number of coins you dig = the average depth. No matter the disparity between individual depths.

Wow that would be a level of data recording I dont think most have the patience for. But, just for humors sake.... throwing out the deepest recovers of 2+ feet and the shallowest of being on the surface... my "average" would probably be 6 - 7 inches for all sites hunted.

Re: What Is The Average Depth Old Coins Are Found In Your Area?
Posted by: Architex
Date: September 29, 2017 11:13AM
One inch deeper than my detector goes.



One Man's Trash...........is what I usually find.

XP Deus / CTX 3030

Where are the diamond rings?.............They said there'd be diamond rings !.

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Re: What Is The Average Depth Old Coins Are Found In Your Area?
Posted by: Jason in Enid
Date: September 29, 2017 12:14PM
Quote
Architex
One inch deeper than my detector goes.

HA! :heh:

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