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Bottle collecting info here
Posted by: beendiggin
Date: June 13, 2010 01:28PM
Here's a link http://www.antique-bottles.net/forum/ to the bottle collecting forum that I've been a member of for a number of years. I can recommend them for anyone interested in learning about the bottles you may have or come into possesion of. A great group, lots of very accurate info. I can also answer most bottle related questions. I've been digging, buying, selling, and researching bottles for about 30 years. Good luck digging!
Paul

Re: Bottle collecting info here
Posted by: beendiggin
Date: June 13, 2010 02:19PM
Here's a couple of Munyon's bottles I dug a couple of years ago . One is a cough cure, the other is a germicide.




Re: Bottle collecting info here
Posted by: croakersmoker78
Date: June 13, 2010 09:19PM
i live in salem county nj where to i get started how do i find old outhouses or dumps where can i get that info

Re: Bottle collecting info here
Posted by: beendiggin
Date: June 14, 2010 03:37PM
There are a few good ways to get started. First, locate the oldest houses in your area. Anything built before 1900 is what I recommend, although there are nice finds in newer dumps too, like milks, toys, poisons, local druggists and sodas, beers, marbles, etc. You can use historical books like town histories, town directories, state registers, old newspapers, or early maps for instance. Try the library or book stores. Antique shops often have old books for sale as well. Also Google does have an archive search of old books and newspapers, which is pretty interesting. If your older part of town was built near a river, check up and down the banks. You can also ask older folks in town if they remember any dumping grounds. Generally, rivers were used a lot for trash disposal.
Most houses/farmsteads in rural areas took the trash they had and tossed it out back somewhere, usually into low areas, over river banks, or over a stone wall. Another good spot to look is under these buildings, or if you have access, in the attics. Crawlspaces under barns, ells, or other outbuildings, even in basements where root cellars were kept are very good spots. A lot of times there would be a trap door or loose floorboard which would be lifted up and trash was tossed. Out of sight...out of mind. Of course, the outhouse is a good place to dig. I usually can locate them in a corner of the barn or ell, or on the outside of the barn wall. Outhouses can be hard to find, so getting a 4' long probe will help. Probes are easy to use, and will sink very quickly into a filled in outhouse, because they are usually topped off with ash or other fill. The surrounding soil will have more resistance when you probe around. Some outhouses, however, had a removable box under them which was emptied periodically, so you won't find a filled in hole with those.
In an urban area, where homes were close together and yards were small, outhouses are easier to find and can produce great finds. They are usually located on the back or side property line. Sometimes they are right down the center, and are typically a short walk from the back door. Lilacs can be an indicator of their location. Most urban household trash was put into the outhouse, because they had to throw the trash somewhere, and the outhouse was an easy solution. In my area, the outhouses are usually 4-6" deep. In other parts of the country, they can be 20" deep because it was easy digging. Town dumps are great if you can find them, however they are not usually marked on maps. Early town reports and board of health reports can also be helpful in researching areas of town where "nuisances" (code for outhouse or trash smells) were present.
Most dumps you locate on the ground or on a riverbank will date from 1875- 1940's. Many times the dump will only date for a small time frame, like 1890's -1920. You never know until you dig it. Privys are usually where you will find earlier pontilled bottles, (1830's - 1870's) but there are always exceptions. Some folks used outhouses into the 20th century.
Check out the link I posted above in my first post. New Jersey has a fantastic and important history in early glass making, so finding info about Jersey glass shouldn't be hard. I'll post some links to other sites next.

Re: Bottle collecting info here
Posted by: beendiggin
Date: June 14, 2010 03:47PM
Re: Bottle collecting info here
Posted by: croakersmoker78
Date: June 14, 2010 09:27PM
thanks a lot

Re: Bottle collecting info here
Posted by: Blacksheep
Date: August 04, 2010 02:21PM
Found a bottle near Hibbing Mn. Says "Wainola Bottling Works Hibbing Mn". Cant find munch info on the net, anyone know anything about this company?

Re: Bottle collecting info here
Posted by: EDLIS Café
Date: February 06, 2017 11:29AM
http://www.ctonlineauctions.com/detail.asp?id=468433&bigpic=0#img

Wäinölä is a Finnish surname... Lots of Finns in Hibbing.

Wäinölä Bottling Works Hibbing, Minn.



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 02/06/2017 11:37AM by EDLIS Café.




Re: Bottle collecting info here
Posted by: ronaldj2
Date: September 13, 2017 06:00PM
I find lots of old dumps in MA. Look for old farms or neighborhoods with older homes pre1900. Look for for ravines on the sides of roads or at the end of old roads. Usually trash was dumped along these type of hillsides. It all flows down hill. Also areas with No Dumping signs . Check hills for traces of broken glass or old China dishes, also for lots of rusted cans and or old rusted iron pieces. These are just some of the visuals without having to do a lot of research. Hope this helps. Good luck !!

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