Findmall.com
 
 






White's Main Detecting Forum


Welcome! Log In Register
vowow#1, here are my opinions about the :whites: MX5 and Coin GT.
Posted by: Monte
Date: September 28, 2013 09:12AM
Quote
yowow#1
Just wondering what people think about the whites MX5, maybe compared to the coinmaster GT, they appear to have pretty close the same functions. just thinking out loud.
Well, I guess you could say I am "thinking out loud" as I write this reply as I have only been using the new MX5 for a couple of days to evaluate it, but I think my assessment, so far, is quite correct.

I like the Coinmaster GT for the price bracket it is in, especially with the number of detectors in that price range that only have a preset GB or lack other nice features the Coin GT has. The Coin GT really is the former Prizm 6T, just in a burgundy-colored housing and using a 2-piece rod system w/o rod-locks. I felt the Prizm 6T was over-priced for the bracket it was designed to compete in, but the Coin GT, the same unit, is now priced very well.

I felt the Prizm 6T was high especially because it had the same suggested retail price as White's M6. While I liked the Prizm 6T for what it offered and how it preformed for what I consider to be the 'average' Coin Hunting hobbyist, I found that I needed more or different performance demands to accomplish successful hunts at the types of sites I seek out, and I consider myself to be a more 'avid detectorist' who understands touch challenges and knows what's needed to be functional under really tough conditions.

That said, a lot of the measure of what is needed in a detector for a consumer is in the types of sites they hunt, the mineralization they face, and the type of trash they generally deal with as well as the density of the trash at a location. For example, here are some examples of what I hear from people faced with common questions or some typical descriptions they offer.:

"I hunt in average ground." ... 'Average?' Just what is 'average?' Some people are lead to believe that gold nuggets are found in very mineralized ground, and since they don't have gold nuggets in their area, they must not be in mineralized ground. Wrong! I have hunted gold nuggets in areas with a more moderate ferrous mineralization level than some of the ghost towns I hunt out west, and more mellow than some urban parks or renovation sites I encounter.

"My ground not too mineralized."... Dirty bad nasty ground mineralization can really have a negative impact on a detector's performance. It is important to know what type of iron mineral ground we are dealing with, and equally important to know how the detector handles the ground (Ground Balance and/or Auto-Tracking) and how to achieve the best sweep speed in varying conditions. There are a lot of differences between various detector circuitry designs when I comes t filtering ground signal and target signals. The typical metal detecting hobbyist generally doesn't know mild from mellow from moderate from severe.

"I like to use Tone ID all the time."... Why, I ask? I usually hear the answer that it helps them find just the good targets, and they usually express the feeling that they think it works great. Near perfect! If their detector is capable of turning 'Off' the Tone ID, I frequently ask if they have tried it, but most often get a 'No' response, and others say "Yes, but everything sounds the same."

That is sort of correct, but a trained ear will start to pick out some subtle audio differences, better with some makes and models than with others. A model with a saturated audio response won't convey subtle information like a good modulated audio can.

If you attended one of my full-day seminars, you would hear the comments of attendees before some demonstrations, and then get some different opinions after I have used their detectors to demonstrate audio responses from several desired targets we would like to find. You would also hear the shocked replies when I demonstrate finding good targets in bad conditions.

I like some Tone ID circuitry, and I use Tone ID when I feel it works reasonably well for the area and can be to my benefit for some casual coin hunting, but seldom for working some older sites with ample ferrous junk.

"I like a light-weight detector so I can cover the ground in a hurry." ... A detector's weight is not what allows a fast sweep of an area, but a combination of the ground mineral conditions as well as the detector's circuitry design. Additionally, we also have to consider the size and type of search coil used, and the amount and density of targets (accepted and rejected) at any hunt site. More often than not, a quick-sweep coverage of most sites is not going to be highly efficient an rewarding.

"I like or need a bigger search coil so I can get better depth."... Depth, depth, depth. I have heard that since I built my first detector back in March of '65 when I asked myself about getting more depth, and, to this day, I always get asked "How deep will it go?" My answer? Deep enough.

Back in the latter '60s and through the '70s, many detectors came with a 5" to 7" coil standard. Some did have an 11" coil, but the 'standard' was often smaller-sized, although many manufacturers settled on a coil of about 8" in diameter during this period.

Through the latter '70s and until the late '80s, many detectors came with a 7" to 8" coil as standard, and a slightly larger accessory coil was optional, in the 10" to 12" size range. Some larger coils, 14", 15" and16", were sold. but promoted mainly for cache hunting or serious relic hunters looking for bigger and/or deeper and bigger targets.

About '88 we saw a new trend to shift from an 8" size to something a little larger. White's went to their 950 coil, and later on Tesoro to an 8X9, Minelab used a 10½", and other manufacturers also went bigger, or partly bigger with an elliptical type coil design, or larger, from many manufacturers.

I have my 12" on a spare lower rod for the very few time it might be called upon for a specific type of hunt. I keep a stock 950 on my White's VX3 because it works well for most sites I use that unit, which is generally for 'cruising' big open areas, such as large grassy parks, sports fields, a beach (fresh or salt water). Now and then I grab my 5900 Di Pro SL or 6000 Pro XL and have the 8" coil mounted, usually for working more open, lower-trash places.

Those are my 'bigger coil' assignments. I have used smaller-sized search coils with excellent results through these many years and I do not have a plan to change that approach to success. I keep a 6½" coil on my MXT Pro, M6, and modified IDX Pro, and a 4" Snooper coil on my Classic ID.

These search coils handle trashy sites well, see less mineralization in bad-ground environments, isolate targets better, are less prone to target masking, give tight and more reliable TID and VDI read-outs as well as Tone ID (when used), and better yet, the detectors are lighter and balance nicer causing less fatigue, and I get very acceptable depth of detection.

"I don't need a smaller size coil because this one works just fine." ... Yes, sometimes a stock search coil can work just fine for 'average' day-to-day hunting in 'average' conditions, with an 'average' amount of common trash. But you know by now what I think about the reference to 'average.' Until a hobbyist uses a smaller search coil for a good 20 hours of hunting the sites they usually visit, and learn to slow down and sweep more efficiently, they are not going to really appreciate the merits of a good smaller-size search coil.

Okay, now back to the Coin GT and new MX5.

As I stated, I do like the Coin GT, but it is a bit limited for the sites I usually hunt, and also in the search coil selection available. The only smaller-size coil, for example, is the elliptical 4X6 Shooter DD. That coil works well and I used a prototype on my 6T years ago and liked it over the stock 9" in the trashier places. I am not a DD fan, but that's what is available for the 6T and Coin GT, and that's the smaller coil I would usually keep mounted to a Coin GT for my types of locations.

On this subject, however, the MX5 not only has more coils available for it from the Eclipse series, but it brings a new coil option to the market for other models with the stock 9" spoked design. I like it better than the 950 coil. The MX5 can also use a Shooter elliptical DD, but better yet, the excellent 6½" Concentric (the 5.3 Eclipse) is a must-have coil for the MX5!

How about other features these two models provide since they are all touch-pad controlled? Okay, look at... :

Discrimination:

The Coin GT has 9 Discrimination or Notch segments to adjust. You can accept or reject any of them, there is no limit.

The MX5 has 20 Discrimination segments to accept or reject, and like the Coin GT, you can pick and choose any of them. This allows for more fine-tuning, if trying to reject a certain range of conductivity to isolate or limit the trash rejection.


Ground Balance:

Both the Coin GT and MX5 have an automated GB that is very quick. The Coin GT does provide the option of turning 'Off' the Auto-Trac ® to lock-and-hold a GB setting. I generally prefer to 'Lock' and hold my GB setting, but the Coin GT works differently from the MXT platform and there are times when I do and times when I don't. I prefer this function on the M6 and MXT Pro and feel they work better.

The MX5 does not have a Track Lock feature and is simply making the rapid automated GB and then relying on Auto-Trac® to maintain peak performance as any ground mineral changes occur. Do I like that? Well, honestly I do, and here's why. I do not look at the MX5 as being a top-end model or one that will fill the ticket for the more avid detectorist. A very avid detectorist would more likely prefer the MXT Pro which features the ability to 'Lock' the GB setting, and also has the Ground Grab touchpad for quick updating when called upon. I know the MXT Pro is still my main-use, all-purpose detector in my arsenal.

I do like the ability to 'Lock' the M6's GB, but I also know most of the folks I speak with who use an M6 prefer to just rely on the automated Auto-Trac® to handle that task, full-time. Well, the MX5, in my opinion, is a first-rate mid-priced model that provides a selection for many hobbyists between the metal-housed M6 with variable knob adjustment, and the plastic-packaged variety using digitally controlled touch-pad adjustment, and the Auto-Trac® circuitry works very well for most of the evaluation hunting I have done so far.


Tone ID:

The Coin GT has a selector for Tone ID 'Off' which provides the operator with a single tone audio response, or Tone ID 'On' and you can get up to 9 Tones, if you are not rejecting anything. There is one tone assigned to each of the Discrimination segments. This is likely very satisfactory for many hobbyists.

The MX5 has three Tone ID choices you can make. here is '1' Tone, which is my preferred pick most of the time, or you can select '2' Tone audio ID. That will give a lower tone for Iron and a higher tone for non-ferrous targets. Or you can select the '8' Tone option. That breaks the VDI reference scale down into certain categories of the 20 Discrimination segments. I prefer the three Tone ID options of the MX5.

Picking the '1' Tone for many uses with a lot of trash, the '2'-Tone often because I like to hunt with very little Discrimination and this will let me hear if I encounter any iron, and that then lets me slow down and hunt around the ferrous debris for any possible partially masked target. Then the '8'-Tone is a nice pick for many popular Coin Hunting places when I just want to kick back and go for 'flash money.'


Other functional adjustments the MX5 provides.:

Target Volume is also adjustable as some like a low-loudness response and I kind of favor hearing a louder audio hit.

Threshold can be adjusted from '0', which I like as it is kind of similar to the M6, to a comfortable low-level that appeals to me, such as a '1', '2' or even '3' level. They gave this adjustment a very broad range and I have no clue why, as it can adjust all the way up to a very loud setting of '99'.

The Sensitivity is adjustable to '10' levels, indicated by bar segments on the right side of the display.

Standard (loudness) or VCO audio can be selected for the Pinpoint All Metal mode, and I usually like VCO for pinpointing, but also like the option to pick based upon the site I am hunting and search mode used.

The Backlight is a simple 'On' / 'Off' choice with only one level, but it is sufficient.

If you get a little confused with the different feature changes you have made and want to start all over, you can do a quick Restore to the factor settings.

And one final feature I do appreciate is that the MX5 has a shut-off Memory that holds all of the settings you use in both the Coin and Beach programs, with the exception of Backlight. That you have to turn 'On', if you want to use it.

The Owner's Manual doesn't name the type of filter-based operation, such as the Coin GT being a 2-filter detector, but since they do say it is based on the MXT 'platform,' and based upon how it has handled the different locations I have worked it and how it behaves in some tough ground conditions, I believe it is using a 3-filter type technology, as do the M6 and MXT Pro models. Plus the manual states to sweep at a 'moderate' rate of about 3 feet per second. Three feet! Heck, that's about how I cover the ground with my 5900 or 6000!

The nice thing about the MXT Pro and M6 is that they do let you use a little faster sweep speed, even in more mineralized ground, and without usually losing any performance or depth like can happen with most 2-filter designs in 'bad ground.' That was one of the strengths I liked about the Compass Scanner series back in '87/'88 that used what John Earle (the design engineer) called 'Vari-filter', and described as a 3-filter technology.

I was especially pleased to see this type of design get put to work in the original MXT and that's one of the strengths that has made it such an all-purpose versatile performer .... as well as the latter off-shoots, the M6 and MXT Pro. The MX5 is behaving much like the M6 and MXT Pro I am comparing it against.

I'll close this lengthy post and apologize if it's been boring to you. It has kept me at the computer almost all night and I am a very slow 2-fingeer typist. Please, pardon any typos as I don't have time to proof-read this. I only grabbed 3 hours of sleep and now I need to fix a quick breakfast as it gets daylight in 5 minutes and I have more detecting and evaluating to do to wrap up getting my feet wet using the MX5. I have, however, determined that is has a place in my personal detector arsenal.

Does it bump my MXT Pro or VX3 or modified IDX Pro from the spots they hold for me? No.

However, with the MXT Pro/M6 like performance it has shown me, and with the 6½" coil mounted for modern-use trashy sites, ghost towns, renovation work, etc., I am adding it to my personal detector battery to replace three models. I like the M6 a lot, in some ways better than the MX5 due to the variable Discrimination that lets me fine-tune a rejection setting, but the M6 has been a lighter-weight model I have grabbed for some quick 'casual' type coin hunting.

I don't really need the M6 because I have the MXT Pro, but I like the M6 for the lighter or handier weight and feel by comparison. Due to my health I often need to 'go light' and just do some quick work as I can't hunt for long. On those occasions I might use the M6 or IDX Pro, but I have also made use of the Teknetics Omega or G2, simply for their lighter feel. I do like the Omega as it is a very solid performer for a lot of the detecting I do, but it falls short in some conditions, such as hunting a dense iron nail infested site.

Both the Omega and G2, like the White's Coin GT and Fisher F5 and many other good detectors, fail to pass my challenging Nail Board Performance Test, usually only giving 1-to-3 hits out of a possible 8, even with a sub-5" coil. I demand 7 or 8 hits out of 8 possible, and might bend a little if a detector only gives me 6 hits.

The M6 and MXT Pro will go 8-for-8 with the right search coil and best sweep speed, and maybe only 7 on a bad day. The MX5 will do what the M6 and MXT Pro do, or at least do a lot better than many other makes and models, so, the MX5 is replacing my Omega, G2 and M6.

Not everyone hunts the variety of sites I look for, and not everyone will want to one two or more detectors, so picking a single mode can be a little more challenging to fin the right one. My suggestion is to give the new White's MX5 a serious look. Use the stock 9" for open areas and the 5.3 Eclipse (6½" diameter) for trashier environments and you will be working with a nice two-coil set-up using a worthy performer in many applications. If the weather hold out, I ought to go to battery #2 before the sun sets. This is sure an enjoyable hobby. :thumbup:

:detecting:

Monte



"Your EYES ... the only 100% accurate form of Discrimination!"


Stinkwater Wells

Just a name that brings back fond memories of old alkali desert favorite sites in Utah, Nevada, and Eastern Oregon. There is no pastime I enjoy more hunting old sites as best I can, doing research, and helping others learn more about this great hobby.:
My 'Tag-Along' buddies: White's VX3 -- MXT All-Pro -- MX5 -- Tesoro Euro Sabre -- with a working assortment of search coils.

My 'On-Call' for periodic duty: Compass Coin Hustler -- 99B -- Teknetics Euro-Tek Pro -- all with an 8" coil or a smaller size.

monte@stinkwaterwells.com
(503) 481-8147


avatar
Re: whites MX5 - coinmaster GT
Posted by: Tom Slick
Date: September 28, 2013 10:58AM
Monte,
Excellent post! Think I'll turn loose of one of my M6's and pick up the MX5 and give it a try.



Arizona
36 years detecting, ex White's dealer.
Current Detectors:
White's Spectra V3i
White's M6 x 2
White's TDI SL
White's GMT
White's Classic III SL
White's IDX Pro w/ Mr. Bill Mods
Fisher Gold Bug Pro
Tesoro Tiger Shark
Minelab Sovereign GT

avatar
Re: whites MX5 - coinmaster GT
Posted by: yowow#1
Date: September 28, 2013 11:18AM
Monte,
Thank you for that post, very informative.

Re: whites MX5 - coinmaster GT
Posted by: padgett79
Date: September 28, 2013 03:26PM
Well written Monte, this should make it very clear for everyone.



is there such a thing as too bad a day for detecting?????? I think not
Whites; XLT,VX3,V3i and now a Beach Hunter id 300

Re: whites MX5 - coinmaster GT
Posted by: bik-il
Date: September 28, 2013 05:05PM
looks interesting.
Am I reading correctly that the MX5 has fixed ground balance compared to the adjustable GB on the M6?
Ive been considering getting an M6, and now theres another choice.
Wondering what to do, and whether the fixed GB on the MX5 is an issue, comparatively speaking.
thanks

Re: whites MX5 - coinmaster GT
Posted by: dirtmaster
Date: September 28, 2013 07:13PM
No its got automatic ground balancing just as in the M6. Makes me wonder whether to cut loose of my M6 to spring for the MX5 too!! Wow thanks Whites lol



Proud owner of Whites M6 and Whites Eagle Spectrum, Lesche Digger, Whites Star Pro Headphones and Garrett Pro Pointer and Whites Bullseye II.

Re: whites MX5 - coinmaster GT
Posted by: bik-il
Date: September 28, 2013 08:02PM
Ah. Gotcha. Thanks Dirtmaster.

Im definitely intrigued.

MX5 or M6? Im thinking. . .

I DO like the knobs on the M6.
I DO like the price of the MX5.
There only seems to be a couple ounce difference in weight so Im leaning towards the metal cased M6.
Mind you, this isn't a NEED issue, as I have other detectors of other brands, and this would be my first Whites, because I just WANT one.
Thanks Monte for your post, by the way. I cant say it made the decision any easier for me though! LOL. Explained things great though.
Still deciding. . .

Re: whites MX5 - coinmaster GT
Posted by: dirtmaster
Date: September 28, 2013 09:52PM
Well I can tell you with my experience with the M6, it is a great detector. I got the 950 coil, the D2 coil, the 5.3 and the 4x6 coil so I am all set for either detector. The only reason I would switch would probably be because its the new kid on the block and that is probably asinine. So I will probably hold on to the M6 as it is a great detector and I see no need to really change. The M6 does feel solid in the metal case and is built like a tank. The knobs do have an edge over the pushbutton notching in my opinion so good luck with your choice. Either one would be a great choice



Proud owner of Whites M6 and Whites Eagle Spectrum, Lesche Digger, Whites Star Pro Headphones and Garrett Pro Pointer and Whites Bullseye II.

Re: whites MX5 - coinmaster GT
Posted by: dirtmaster
Date: September 28, 2013 10:03PM
One more thought.....I need to stick with my golden rule, when you find a detector you really like, stick with it and master it and you will be the king of the fields with it.



Proud owner of Whites M6 and Whites Eagle Spectrum, Lesche Digger, Whites Star Pro Headphones and Garrett Pro Pointer and Whites Bullseye II.

Re: whites MX5 - coinmaster GT
Posted by: bik-il
Date: September 28, 2013 10:39PM
Great advice! Thank you DM!

Im in no rush so ill probably wait until my dealer has the MX5 in stock and try both machine out. I mentioned I'm partial to knobs and the metal case, (two things that attracted me to Whites in the first place) so absent any major gains in performance I'm leaning towards the M6.

Thanks again. I'll keep you posted.

Bik

bik-il, this is for you.
Posted by: Monte
Date: September 29, 2013 07:16AM
Quote
bik-il
looks interesting.
Many new detectors hit the market and can "look interesting," but when I get a hold of one to evaluate it I am sometimes satisfied, sometimes saddened, and sometimes I just plain wonder what the heck were they thinking. Then there are the other times when I am more than just 'satisfied,' and the MX5 is one of them.

Quote
bik-il
looks Am I reading correctly that the MX5 has fixed ground balance compared to the adjustable GB on the M6?
Not preset, just the same type of very quick automated Ground Balance with Auto-Trac® to maintain a proper setting of the ground mineral changes during a search. So far, in the various sites I have hunted, the MX5 Ground Balance behaves similar to the M6 and MXT Pro in their ground tracking toggle position.

Quote
bik-il
looks Ive been considering getting an M6, and now theres another choice. Wondering what to do, and whether the fixed GB on the MX5 is an issue, comparatively speaking.
Well, the two models have similar Ground Balance, so that's not the issue. It comes down to which of the two models offers you what you would like in a detector.

Quote
bik-il
MX5 or M6? Im thinking. .
Some basic differences between the MX5 and M6 are,:

The MX5:

* is New
* has a Backlight
* has a separate Target Volume adjustment
* has a Sensitivity adjustment wit 10 segments
* has a 1, 2 or 8 Tone ID selection
* has VCO audio On or Off for the Pinpoint/All Metal mode
* has a segmented type Discrimination with 20 segments or notches
* has a "Suspend Operation" setting to cut off the audio during target recovery, or maybe a conversation with someone or answering a phone
* is in a plastic, but durable, housing
* relies on factory preset settings for the two search modes, but lets the operator make desired adjustments
*
*
The M6:

* is Proven
* has Target Volume and Signal Balance (aka Pre-Amp Gain or Rx Gain) incorporated in the Sensitivity circuitry
* has a variable Sensitivity control (kind of)
* has a trigger-toggle to select 1 Tone or 7 Tone ID
* has a variable Discrimination control
* is in the very familiar metal housing with proven durability

Quote
bik-il
I DO like the knobs on the M6.
As a rule, I usually prefer knob adjustment, especially for Discrimination, as I can fine-tune the setting.

Quote
bik-il
I DO like the price of the MX5.
It is $100 less in suggested retail, and te MX5 is impressive, so it does make it a tough choice for some people. There are those who just have to have the newest and latest detector, and there are those who are comfortable with a reliable and proven detector and are in no hurry to change.

Quote
bik-il
There only seems to be a couple ounce difference in weight so Im leaning towards the metal cased M6.
Correct, very little difference, and both the MX5 and M6 are comfortable, even for longer periods of search.

Quote
bik-il
Mind you, this isn't a NEED issue, as I have other detectors of other brands, and this would be my first Whites, because I just WANT one.
Now, there's a great idea .... GET A WHITE'S IN YOUR HAND! They have several very good models, and both the MX5 and M6 are in that mix.

Quote
bik-il
Thanks Monte for your post, by the way. I cant say it made the decision any easier for me though! LOL. Explained things great though.
Still deciding. . .

Im in no rush so ill probably wait until my dealer has the MX5 in stock and try both machine out. I mentioned I'm partial to knobs and the metal case, (two things that attracted me to Whites in the first place) so absent any major gains in performance I'm leaning towards the M6.
You're welcome, if I was of help, and sorry about the call for decision making. It would be good to visit a dealer, or two, and check out the models you are interested in. I might wear the batteries out today, but I was just a few hours short of the estimated '30-hour' suggested battery life yesterday and it's still running strong.

A couple of things I didn't mention in my first post is that the DVD was done rather well and Steve Howard has a very clear and understandable voice. The Owner's Manual is also very good, and I only caught a few glitches when I sped-read through it.

I was on the phone yesterday with calls from a few friends who have an MXT Pro or and M6, or both, and we discussed some of the performance and behavior of the MX5. It does become a more personal decision.

Monte



"Your EYES ... the only 100% accurate form of Discrimination!"


Stinkwater Wells

Just a name that brings back fond memories of old alkali desert favorite sites in Utah, Nevada, and Eastern Oregon. There is no pastime I enjoy more hunting old sites as best I can, doing research, and helping others learn more about this great hobby.:
My 'Tag-Along' buddies: White's VX3 -- MXT All-Pro -- MX5 -- Tesoro Euro Sabre -- with a working assortment of search coils.

My 'On-Call' for periodic duty: Compass Coin Hustler -- 99B -- Teknetics Euro-Tek Pro -- all with an 8" coil or a smaller size.

monte@stinkwaterwells.com
(503) 481-8147


Re: whites MX5 - coinmaster GT
Posted by: bik-il
Date: September 29, 2013 11:50AM
Cheers Monte!

Thanks much. I appreciate your help.
the backlight and two-tone option on the new model sure look nice.
Am I understanding you correctly that the M6 is one OR seven tone optioned? I hunt frequently in two -tone with my other brands of detectors so I am curious.
thanks again

Re: whites MX5 - coinmaster GT
Posted by: dirtmaster
Date: September 29, 2013 01:21PM
Yes you can hunt in one tone or 7 tones on the M6. Trigger forward allows 7 tones. The cool thing I have found is discrimination also works on the 7 tone mode.



Proud owner of Whites M6 and Whites Eagle Spectrum, Lesche Digger, Whites Star Pro Headphones and Garrett Pro Pointer and Whites Bullseye II.

Backlights, Tones, and other stuff.
Posted by: Monte
Date: October 01, 2013 09:51AM
The first two are handy and useful at times, but a lot of the other stuff we see added to various makes and models in the industry and can be interesting, but not always very functional. By functional I don't mean whether the feature works or not, but whether it is really a valuable or practical asset to the cause of looking and finding.

A Backlight feature is pretty simple to figure out an apply its useful function. Can't see the display? Turn on the light!

Tone ID, on the other hand calls for more time in use to really learn how well it works, and when to and when not-to use the multi-tone function. All too often the less experienced hobbyists think of it more as a magic potion or something and believe it works .... perfectly .... and also works well .... all the time .... and it might take a long time before reality really hits them. Tone ID can sometimes be useful, but it can also be detrimental, be fooled by odd objects, mixed alloys, crazy target positions, and less accurate on mid-depth to deeper targets.

As dirtmaster mentioned in a response to your post, yes, the M6 has both a single tone response (with the trigger-toggle in the center position) or a 7-Tone audio ID (accessed by flipping the trigger-toggle forward).
They incorporated the same 7-Tone ID on the MXT Pro in the Coin &Jewelry program, as well, and with both the MXT Pro and M6, it is a personal choice to use, or not use, the Tone ID feature. I only use Tone ID on limited occasions, mainly when just coin hunting in newer-use areas with a lower level of trash.

I very, very seldom use Tone ID in any older site or a densely littered place, with the exception of sometimes using a 2-Tone option to just identify low-tone ferrous targets and high-ton non-ferrous targets. Even that's not perfect, but it can be functional at times. I have visual TID on all my current use detectors, but I don't always look a the display, especially when hunting older sites. I just rely on the audio response and most often it is a single-tone audio I am hearing. A single tone and any subtle information I might also hear in the audio.

It definitely can be a very individual or personal set of features we each look for in a detector.

Monte



"Your EYES ... the only 100% accurate form of Discrimination!"


Stinkwater Wells

Just a name that brings back fond memories of old alkali desert favorite sites in Utah, Nevada, and Eastern Oregon. There is no pastime I enjoy more hunting old sites as best I can, doing research, and helping others learn more about this great hobby.:
My 'Tag-Along' buddies: White's VX3 -- MXT All-Pro -- MX5 -- Tesoro Euro Sabre -- with a working assortment of search coils.

My 'On-Call' for periodic duty: Compass Coin Hustler -- 99B -- Teknetics Euro-Tek Pro -- all with an 8" coil or a smaller size.

monte@stinkwaterwells.com
(503) 481-8147


avatar
Re: whites MX5 - coinmaster GT
Posted by: Rob in (Ca)
Date: October 20, 2013 05:58PM
Is the mx 5 a silent search or threshold detector ?



Long Beach ca,

Sorry, only registered users may post in this forum.

Click here to login