Findmall.com
 
 






Garrett Users Forum


Welcome! Log In Register
How to tell silver clad?
Posted by: NWMOhunter
Date: May 24, 2007 05:31PM
How can you tell if a coin was made silver clad? I'm looking through half dollars today and have read where some were made silver clad by mistake. Is the best way to tell to look at the edge and if it has 2 colors (like brass and silver) then it isn't silver?

Or is there another way?

Easy-1965, 1966, 1967, 1968 and 1969...
Posted by: Paul(NWO)
Date: May 24, 2007 09:05PM
Kennedy halves only. The 1970's were only issued from the mint, so it would be a stange find. The proof coins are full silver with an "S" mint mark and do show up in the rolls occasionally and are shiny on the background with frosty details. Check with ebay. A;so there are error coins such as double die in those years. There's an RPM-Re-Punched Mint Mark "D" on the 1964. You need a good magnifier to see it. No one collects them much so the errors don't have much value but add to a collection.
HH

avatar
Pre 1965, 90% silver, 1965-70, 40% Silver. All KeepersN/T
Posted by: awhitster
Date: May 24, 2007 09:15PM

(This message does not contain any text.)



Have :garrett: Ace 250, Will Travel
....please leave a ring....after the beep....
Awhitster in California
Swing and dig folks, swing and dig, because according to the late, great Mel Fisher, Today COULD be the day.


Have you found a 1970? It was only issued in mint form. Wow!N/T
Posted by: Paul(NWO)
Date: May 24, 2007 09:20PM

(This message does not contain any text.)


avatar
Re: Have you found a 1970? It was only issued in mint form. Wow!
Posted by: awhitster
Date: May 24, 2007 09:49PM
Nope. 1970s, Silver Proof, 1970d, 40%, only sold in mint sets, proofs.



Have :garrett: Ace 250, Will Travel
....please leave a ring....after the beep....
Awhitster in California
Swing and dig folks, swing and dig, because according to the late, great Mel Fisher, Today COULD be the day.


Re: How to tell silver clad?
Posted by: NWMOhunter
Date: May 24, 2007 11:52PM
I just read that in 1971 and 1977 halves, some were accidentally clad in silver. I was trying to figure out how you could tell if it was or wasn't.

This is where I got my info.....
http://www.coinrollhunting.com/halves.php

Re: How to tell silver clad?
Posted by: Uncle Willy
Date: May 25, 2007 12:21AM
Some of the Kennedy halves were 40% silver but it wasn't clad, it was part of the general composition. Also clad is a different color than silver. Silver just tarnishes whereas clad corrodes and darkens with age and use and won't polish up to original brilliance. All clads are a sandwich of copper and base metal which shows up on the edge.

Bill

See post below. There were silver sandwich clads. Ebay has them up for auction.N/T
Posted by: Paul(NWO)
Date: May 25, 2007 05:39AM

(This message does not contain any text.)


Re: Pre 1965, 90% silver, 1965-70, 40% Silver. All Keepers
Posted by: John D.
Date: May 25, 2007 06:38AM
A metal detector sitting in a closet is as useless as an unread book, so "Swing and dig, daily if possible. I have found more in 2 years than so have found in 20 years, because I swing and dig as often as possible.



John D.

avatar
All You Need To Know About Kennedy Half's
Posted by: awhitster
Date: May 25, 2007 08:06AM
Kennedy Half's

1964 (silver) Composition: .900 silver, .100 copper.
1965 to 1970 (silver-clad) Composition: Outer layer of .800 silver, .200 copper bonded to inner core of .210 silver, .790 copper.

1971 to present. (copper-nickel-clad) Composition: Outer layer of .750 copper, .250 nickel bonded to pure copper inner core.

Errors: I read where some of the 1965-70 silver clad planchets got into the 1971 planchets so you should be on the lookout for one of these silver looking 1971s.

Supposedly this also happened in 1977. Some of the silver planchets for the 1976 bi-centennial coins got into the 1977 planchets.

Definition: A planchet is a prepared disc-shaped metal blank onto which the devices of a coin image are struck or pressed. The metal disc is called a blank until the time it passes through the upsetting machine which causes the rim to be raised. Once it has a rim, the disc is called a planchet.




The Rest Of The Story
When Congress opted to eliminate silver from the dime and quarter beginning in 1965, it reached a compromise with the half dollar: Its silver content, while greatly reduced overall, was placed almost entirely at the coin's surface by bonding three strips of metal, the innermost one being primarily copper. These "silver-clad" pieces were coined from 1965 through 1970. Despite these various steps, Kennedy half dollars still failed to circulate to any great extent, and the question of eliminating its silver content altogether was eventually raised. After protracted debate during 1969-70, a bill was finally passed near the end of 1970 which called for the coining of half dollars in the same composition used since 1965 for the dime and quarter: two outer layers of copper and nickel bonded to an inner core of pure copper. From 1971 onward, the Kennedy half dollar would bear the red edge which had already become familiar to Americans who mourned the passing of silver from the nation's coinage. Alas, even this concession was not enough to make half dollars reappear in circulation, and today they are known only to coin collectors and gambling casino patrons.

For the nation's bicentennial in 1976, a special reverse was prepared by Seth G. Huntington which depicted Philadelphia's Independence Hall, birthplace of the United States. Huntington's design had been selected from among numerous entries in a 1973 competition. Bicentennial halves bearing the dual dates 1776-1976 were coined during 1975 and 1976 in both copper-nickel-clad and silver-clad compositions. The latter were not released to circulation, but rather were sold at a premium to collectors in both uncirculated and proof editions.
There are no rare date/mint combinations in the Kennedy half dollar series, although some pieces saw limited distribution. Proofs were coined for collectors in 1964 at the Philadelphia Mint and since 1968 at the San Francisco Mint. So-called "special mint set" coins were offered in place of true proofs during 1965-67, and these are usually collected in conjunction with the proof sets. The 1970-D half dollars were struck only to fill that year's orders for mint sets, pending the change to copper-nickel coinage; the silver-clad, bicentennial halves were likewise coined only for collectors. In 1987, the Mint announced that no half dollars of that date would be issued for circulation, and this caused a surge in the number of mint sets ordered. Finally, since 1992, the Mint has offered proof sets of both the conventional copper-nickel coinage and ones in which the dime, quarter and half are .900 fine silver, the composition used in 1964 and earlier years.



Have :garrett: Ace 250, Will Travel
....please leave a ring....after the beep....
Awhitster in California
Swing and dig folks, swing and dig, because according to the late, great Mel Fisher, Today COULD be the day.


Sorry, only registered users may post in this forum.

Click here to login