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1260x aquisition
Posted by: Digging Fool
Date: October 15, 2015 07:24PM
My wife and I went to a local town tonight to dine out, and we saw a "fresh" yard sale sign. We went to the house, and the yard was full of junk. I had heard that the people had a couple of detectors that THEY purchased at yard sales over the years, so I asked the guy if he had any metal detectors for sale. He said 'yes", and went in the house. He came out with a Fisher 1260x, and a Bounty Hunter machine. I asked him how much for the 1260x, and he said 'how does 15.00 sound?" :clapping: I got it for that amount. Looks to have seen very little use, but it was not stored in a very clean environment, and I think it was in his basement. It turns-on and beeps, even with the old batteries in it, but knobs are a little 'stiff". My wife wouldn't let me bring it in the house because of the odor that it had! Not a very clean house at all, and the guy was a cigar smoker. I can't find much info on this model, and was wondering how it compares to a 1265 or 1266 for relic hunting? Will try to clean it up and post pics tomorrow night.

Re: 1260x aquisition
Posted by: Digging Fool
Date: October 16, 2015 05:45PM
Pictures...




Re: 1260x aquisition
Posted by: Digging Fool
Date: October 16, 2015 05:46PM
It's a Los Banos model.

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Re: 1260x aquisition
Posted by: WV62
Date: October 16, 2015 08:12PM
Looks pretty good for a old timer. I have never had a 1260x in my hand so I don't really know how it will do on a hunt or how it does compared to the 1265x or 1266x. I know they don't share coils.

If you start looking for coils the 1220 and 1260 will share, the connectors are male for your machine so be sure and check the connectors before you by. They made a little 3.75" coil for your machine, if you can find one they work real good in the trash.

Put it up for sale, I bet you can get more than your money back.

Ron in WV



Worked and lived in the Huntington West Virginia area all my life, retired 2010
US Air Force Vietnam Veteran (68-69 & 70-71)
Started getting into metal detecting around 1975

Re: 1260x aquisition
Posted by: Digging Fool
Date: October 17, 2015 07:30AM
Quote
WV62
Looks pretty good for a old timer. I have never had a 1260x in my hand so I don't really know how it will do on a hunt or how it does compared to the 1265x or 1266x. I know they don't share coils.

If you start looking for coils the 1220 and 1260 will share, the connectors are male for your machine so be sure and check the connectors before you by. They made a little 3.75" coil for your machine, if you can find one they work real good in the trash.

Put it up for sale, I bet you can get more than your money back.

Ron in WV
Thanks, Ron! I've owned a 1265, but never used it enough to get familiar with it. The double discriminators were hard for me to get used to, but I'm gonna try this one out good.

Re: 1260x aquisition
Posted by: Dave J.
Date: October 17, 2015 11:09AM
You've got a classic there!

The Fisher 1260-X was the first 2nd derivative motion discriminator, introduced May 1982. That discrimination method, whether in circuitry or in software, is still the foundation of single frequency discriminating metal detector design. all the way from the Bounty Hunter Junior to the Fisher F75.

Its mechanical design was also revolutionary. Although the design method was "seat of the pants", the ergonomics came out so good that it later became the inspiration for the scientifically ergonomically engineered Teknetics T2 introduced in 2006. In 2015 it's still the only ergonomically engineered metal detector design on the market, complete with published ergonomic specifications.

In the early 1980's market dominated by VLF/TR, manual ground balance non-motion all metals operation, with the occasional "whipper" narrowband motion machine, and dominated by U-handle mechanical design, the 1260-X was revolutionary. No manual ground balance. No static (non-motion) modes and no retune button. If you stopped over a target, the sound stopped, you had to keep it in motion. It wasn't obvious from a picture what made the newfangled mechanical package better. We'd taken away most of the stuff everyone thought they needed and were familiar with, and replaced it with an expensive for that time (about $500) mystery.

It was so revolutionary that nobody knew quite what to think of it. For about 6 months, everyone was waiting for someone else to spend the money and find out what the heck it really was. This was before the Internet, word didn't get around overnight. A few dealers got the guts to take the plunge, and quickly decided they liked what they had in their hands, the thing was for real. A turn-on-and-go machine so easy to use that you could hand it to someone who'd never used a metal detector before, and in 60 seconds they could be beeping stuff out of the ground. And although it weighed over 4 pounds, it was almost effortless to swing. About November 1982 it was like the floodgates opened, we were backlogged for about 2 years.

By modern standards, its performance wasn't much. Air test about 7 1/2 to 8 inches on coins. The superficially similar 1265 and 1266 platforms that came later were far hotter, the '66 being in the 12 to 14 inch range air test. But in the early 1980's the "whipper" motion machines were only good for about 6 inches, and you had to really know what you were doing to get that 6 inches. Some VLF/TR disc machines would air test in the 10 inch range, but in many soils getting 5 inches required very careful technique. What was new with the 1260-X was fairly decent discrimination depth on buried targets, with no skill required.

The first 1260's had an drawn aluminum Zero can electronics enclosure-- expensive, but didn't require an expensive injection mold. After demand hit, we had enough money to do an injection molded plastic housing. People whined "Fisher had a rugged aluminum housing, and then went to cheap flimsy plastic, is nothing sacred any more?" What they didn't know was that the aluminum cans were constantly getting banged up, they dented and bent. The plastic version gets banged around and bounces right back. Here we are more than 30 years later still using those plastic boxes on the Gold Bug 2, in production for 20 years and it probably gets the roughest use of anything we manufacture.

* * * * * * *
The 1980's were an era of rapid evolution in the metal detector industry. Although I didn't know it in 1981, I wasn't the only engineer developing a second derivative motion discriminator. Jack Gifford and Charlie Garrett were doing the same and it wasn't long before they also had 'em on the market. The BFO's, TR's, and VLF/TR's that had been the mainstays of the 1970's all died a sudden death. Meanwhile George Payne pioneered sampled second derivative target ID with the early Teknetics: we're still selling revisions of the "Payne platforms" in the legacy BH line, and in the Fisher lineup as the F2 and F4. And it was during the 1980's that behind the scenes, both Fisher and Minelab were developing their respective multifrequency technologies , both introduced to the market in 1991 and the foundation of both companies' multifrequency products to this day.

I swung my first multifreak prototype in 1983. With only 6 inches of air hots and everything fiddled to make that particular unit work, it was far from being a marketable product. But it did what it was supposed to prove could be done: it discriminated in mineralized ground that rendered singlefreakers almost useless. In the mid 1980's I was also experimenting with ground cancelled PI, but for the purpose of a fully static target ID machine. Wrong application, all we got out of it was the Impulse underwater machine. Meanwhile others were playing around with PI's for gold prospecting especially in Australia, and that led to Minelab's intro of competitive PI gold machines in the mid 1990's.

The old timers often complain that the new crop of machines aren't any better than the ones from 20 and 30 years ago. I'd disagree with them on that, but there's some truth behind it. Most of what's being done now is based on work done in the 1980's, and some 1990's products were so good that they're still regarded as competitive and still being sold.

Life has been good to me. In February of 1991, the Fisher factory was shut down for a month due to lack of orders to fill, and I'd never in my life swung a metal detector. Nobody could have known that it was the right place to be, at the right time. But that's how it turned out.

Re: 1260x aquisition
Posted by: Dave J.
Date: October 17, 2015 03:10PM
Ouch! Please make that February 1981!

Re: 1260x aquisition
Posted by: Digging Fool
Date: October 17, 2015 04:55PM
Quote
Dave J.
Ouch! Please make that February 1981!
Thanks, Dave! I really enjoyed your informative and interesting reply. My machine came with a 9-volt battery snapped in each battery compartment. I'm sure this is quite common with these older machines, as people think that's what they are supposed to do. I have ordered 2 "universal" 4-AA packs that look like they should work. Couldn't find any original Fisher packs. I don't want to overload either side with too many volts, so I will wait until the AA packs come in before taking it out. I started digging in the early 80's, and like the vintage machines! Thanks again....Rick

Re: 1260x aquisition
Posted by: nge
Date: February 12, 2016 07:49AM
Be vey cautious of the brand AA's that you use in that 1200 series machine. Some (Kodak) batteries are slightly longer than the majority and they will crack your battery packs on the end caps. You have to look real close to see the hairline cracks, this will make for very erratic on/off issues. I owned one of the first 1260-X's. A little tip and a story of why I went to it. Way back a long time ago, I was in my local historical flood plain park. At the time I was using Compass Relic Magnum 7, (VLF/TR) machine with a 12" coil. I found lots of good things with it down to 7 inches in "dry" ground, 8 to 9" in wet ground. As I was going down a hill in my local park, I spotted three other people doing the same thing, but they were using strange looking machines. Black boxes with a crooked handle and shaft. The ground that day was "rock hard" from top to bottom. I asked if they were getting anything, they said yes and showed me a handful of silver and wheats. I asked what new fangled machine they were using, they said it was "new" on the market and that it was a Fisher 1260-X! They said they loved it because they didn't need wet or damp dirt to make it go deep. They said they were getting stuff up to 8" deep in dry dirt. Just then one of the others were still swinging as I was talking to one of the others, and said " hey I have a silver dime about 6 inches deep here, here listen with your machine. I swept my Compass over the spot and didn't hear a thing, so I switched over to VLF, still, not even a peep. I said, prove it to me! He proceeded to get a 3" brick chisel and a 3lb. ball pein hammer out, and began banging away. When he got the top grass off, then he switched to a stout screwdriver. At about 5 1/2 inches deep laying in the bottom of the hole was a Winged Liberty dime. I told them that when my machine could not hear a dime at 6 inches, it was time to get a new machine! The woman in the group said.....hey I bought 2 machines. Would you like to use it while we are in the park/ Man, I jumped the highest I had ever jumped before. Much lighter than my "Iron Duke" Pinpointed dead center, and got signals that day that I could never hear with that old Mag 7. So, for the rest of that week end I hunted with that group, using their spare machine. The following week mine was in the mail from KellyCo. Now for the tip. If you set your discriminator knobs to the #3, and just a shade under #6 (you will still get nickels and rings), while eliminating most other trash. When you get a good signal in #1 discrim, push or pull the toggle switch to the #2 discrim. If the sound stays the same, then it is anything but silver. If it is silver then the tone will be a bit more bassy in sound (base-y). Sorta wished I still had my 1260-X. But I also still own a 1266-X, and a Minelab Etrac. Good luck with your new toy and HH....... NGE



Exposure to the Son, Prevents burning......

Re: 1260x aquisition
Posted by: nge
Date: February 12, 2016 07:51AM
I have been detecting since 1960. Started with a Radio Shack BFO that I got on my 10th. birthday.........nge



Exposure to the Son, Prevents burning......

Re: 1260x aquisition
Posted by: MikeW
Date: February 17, 2016 07:06PM
Wow great info. Thanks Dave. I still have my 1260 x, held together with tape, but still working:))

Re: 1260x aquisition
Posted by: Doctorcoinz
Date: March 27, 2016 10:43AM
I used a 1260 X a few times a year ago , it's perfectly capable for coin shooting. The Discrimination told a lot , sputtery signals were virtually ALWAYS trash - the sound of coins is unmistakable! , a lovely round sound!
The 1265x were deeper but you dug DEEP iron - very deep. I never dug much deep iron with the 1260 x.

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