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permission
Posted by: william1
Date: March 03, 2012 08:45AM
Im sure you guys have looked at an area and said ,"I wish I could detect there". Well I'm at that point. I have no problem approaching people. But, I'm stumped for words on how to approach someone and tell them I want to dig holes in your lawn , and find jewelry, coins, and old relics. Of course I'm making a joke but on the other hand that is what we do. I can't seem to get my head this idea. Any help would greatly appreciated thanks

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I never say dig holes LOL
Posted by: Elton
Date: March 03, 2012 09:09AM
I always say scan your yard for old coins and relics. I also ask if any family member lost a ring etc. that perhaps I will find while doing the scanning.
Further I tell them it is a fun way to do a History Search for lost items on their property..............
If it is long time family owned property, I make certain they know I will give them any specific property I locate that belongs to a relative from the past. ..this could be a ring, broach, anything that can be suggested as belonging to Mother, Father, even something they lost as a child...

I once found an Old Metal Cigarette case...................... Owner was positive it belonged to his Grandmother ........ he remembered it sitting next to her chair on a table when he was a little boy....
This one find opened up two other properties the family owned.. I also found a roll of Wheat Pennies still in a semi rolled position..of course the paper was gone. Owner remembered he buried the roll of pennies when he was eight years old, and could not find them... We split the pennies found 48 total........ he was as happy as if I returned a family heirloom LOL..



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Re: permission
Posted by: Dan-Pa.
Date: March 03, 2012 09:39AM
First and foremost if someone appeared at your door and asked the same thing ....what would you say....always comes to mind...

Personally abandoned yards, old ball fields, fairgrounds, parks etc. are more my style but if you must..

Appear at the door in clean clothes well shaven, don't mention treasure, digging holes and don't have a large knife or digging tool hanging from your belt, offer to return old heirlooms, rings, medals etc. and scanning as Elton mentions sounds better than digging and old coins rather than treasure also applies. Many do it and courtesy and neatness goes a long way and some guys actually have cards made up with your data which may help even to get permission to search other yards where vauables have been lost. All old yards have silver coins depending how busy they have been over the years so indeed certainly a thought and all they can say is no or perhaps yes and possibilities are endless if you wish to venture in this type of metal detecting and certainly your call...

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Re: permission
Posted by: Big Fang Coin Biter
Date: March 04, 2012 06:51AM
Here is my approach. I make it short with well chosen words. Obviously they wonder what I want. I tell them quickly then let them think about it by being quiet. My buddy Neal says when I ask, it is like I could care less whether I hunt the yard or not. I think that is good to not put any kind of pressure on the folks. Do thank them even if they turn you down.

Knock on the door then step back off the porch or back up about six feet. (less intimidating than a stranger a foot away).

Here is my line: Hello, my name is (first and last name). I live over in (town). I have a hobby of metal detecting; I go looking for old coins and stuff, and I was wondering if you would consider letting me look in your yard with my metal detector? (here is where you wait while they think about it, smile, pet the cat)

Once they say "I guess that will be ok," I tell them this: Thanks so much that will be great! I should mention that I have to dig a small hole (hold up hands indicating a small u-shaped plug). I just cut the sod, pop it up and then put it back down (hand gestures optional). I am very careful not to make a mess.

One out of ten will change their mind at this point, which is better than having them run out screaming "Why are you digging up my yard?!!". Some folks actually think we are going to pick stuff off the surface!

I would guess that this approach has gained me permission about 70% of the time. Do not be too disappointed with a few no's. Also do not let a nice yard stop you from asking. I have had folks tell me not to worry about making a mess in their super maintained front yard! I have also had folks with almost no grass in the yard, turn me down because they are concerned that I will wreck their yard! You just do not know until you ask!

Good luck and HH - BF

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Re: permission
Posted by: JJ
Date: March 05, 2012 02:14PM
Quote
Big Fang Coin Biter
Here is my line: Hello, my name is (first and last name). I live over in (town). I have a hobby of metal detecting; I go looking for old coins and stuff, and I was wondering if you would consider letting me look in your yard with my metal detector? (here is where you wait while they think about it, smile, pet the cat)

The above quoted is what I say, almost verbatim, and it works 9 out of 10 times. Only one person (not two or three) knocks on the door because you don't want intimidation before you even ask a question. I'm not a big fan of more than 2 people hunting a small property anyway. Its very important to smile, maintain eye contact, and don't try to BS people. I have learned not to voluntarily go into depth about the digging part unless they ask, as I figure they will put 2 and 2 together. If they ask, then I will go on to explain how I dig and how they won't even know I was there. Some people will be glued to the window watching you hunt the entire time. These concerned property owners are most likely to change their mind and ask you to leave. They have that right. When that happens I keep my digging to a minimum and cherry pick. While digging, place yourself between the plug and the home with your back to the home and work quickly keeping the amount of time the plug is open and their view to a minimum. Some people see an open plug and respond like they see blood, they FREAK, even though you know it will look perfect when you are done. So keep digging time to an absolute minimum and try not to give people a reason to freak out.

In-situ photography is also out of the question when I hunt. Not only does it increase the amount of time someone has to see an open plug in their yard but they also want to know what is so great that you are photographing it. Dishonest? Not really. If I were to get permission and someone states that they want half of what I find or their choice of what I find then a deal is a deal. I will honor that request. But without that agreement beforehand then I volunteer nothing but a sincere "Thank you" before departing. I don't really think anybody who hunts private property has the intention of spending time and gas money to travel to some random property just to give the property owner everything they find. But if you agree to it before hand then a deal is a deal. Once you get a few "yes"s under your belt then you will get a little more confidence in yourself and your approach, until it almost feels like a cookie cutter process and you are almost surprised to get a "no". Give it some thought and take the first step! GL, JJ

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Re: permission
Posted by: JJ
Date: March 05, 2012 02:46PM
furthermore...I have been AMAZED at how many times knocking on one door gets you the OK to hunt 3 or 4 other properties. Usually the property owner is fascinated with us and what we are doing and offers to help. They call their sister, mother, cousin, etc.. down the street and get us permission there too. Or a neighbor from the property next door comes out to talk and now we are hunting there. One OK can have a snowball effect and now you have a green light to hunt half the block. Maybe it's just a midwest thing but that happens allot! JJ

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Re: permission
Posted by: triplehooked
Date: March 05, 2012 09:03PM
Good info. here guys. I haven't had to do too much door knocking yet, as I'm still mostly working on relatives' and friends' yards, but I've been eyeballing a few places lately. I did stop last fall at an old home that was turned into a fancy boutique and figured it would be a flat out no as it was very ritzy. Surprisingly I not only got a yes, but also a location of an engagement ring that was tossed by a jaded suitor after a declined proposal!! I haven't made it out to that location yet, but I will!! I also approached a one room school house from the mid-late 1800's that had been converted into a small rural financial business. I was given the ok to detect, but only after agreeing to give up everything I found. I wanted the experience so I agreed. I went out and found an old pocket knife and a wheatie or two. The business was closed so I left them on the patio by the front entry. I returned a few days later only to see the items still there, which kinda made me mad, so I asked the owner about them. He told me that he wanted to see if I was really interested in finding the stuff more than keeping it, and then told me that I could keep everything, but expected a 50/50 split on anything over $50. Over the next few hunts I found one Indian, two or three old barlow style knives, an old broach, and a few wheaties. It is cool to see how much interest people have in detecting once you show up and start digging. With the SE I have hopes to punch down a bit farther and pull out some more silver at these sites....

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Re: permission
Posted by: cometguy
Date: March 06, 2012 10:12AM
My experience says that "hunt" and "dig" are both bad words. I like Elton's scan. I ask a few questions about their house or property to see if they know the history. If they are interested in the history I like to tell them I hope to find something that will date the property.
I am in a rural area and the word "hunt" has actually made people think about guns and hunting. Your introduction is important. A willingness to return family items is also a key in my mind. There have been a lot of great suggestions. You should be in good shape. Let us know how you get along.

Don
HH

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What you need is an ice breaker!
Posted by: Jim Vokes NY
Date: April 19, 2012 06:02PM
I too use to have a problem knocking on doors and the comments on this forum are very good. My question was that "why would anyone let me dig holes in their yard to find coins?" Also how do I pick a "convenient time" to actually knock on the door. What if the person answering the door just had a fight with their mate or is stressed out over any number of stuff that happens during one's day? Hmmm?

One day I decided on a way to get started without knocking on the door! I drove all over my area of older homes in town and in the country looking for "yard sales" or folks out mowing the lawn... After talking about their beautiful older home and it's history, I talk about my metal detecting hobby and wonder if there are any old fair grounds, old ball fields, old church yards, country cellar holes, etc. etc.. After all of this, I ask if there is any way I could detect their lawn. Then give them my sales pitch.. use a cloth to deposit the dirt so it can be replace easily. How I have done it many times and have always been allowed back. How I cut a "C" or a "pie" shaped cut so that the grass roots stay connected.. etc... I have had a very good permission rate.

The worst situation I walked into by knocking at the door greeted by an older gentleman.... was caused by a "detectorist?" who had requested to detect the property the day before I got there. When he was refused, he told the owner: "That's OK, I will just wait till you DIE and then I will detect it anyway."

Needless to say, I never got to hunt there that day...

Another way to "break the ice" is to write a permission letter. To a home owner, a park superintendent, a school principal etc. Click on the link below and them modify it to fit your own situation. Good Luck!

Permission Letter!



-------------------------- "Be patient! God isn't finished with me yet!"

"I am sick and tired of people who say that if you debate and you disagree with this administration somehow you're not patriotic. We should stand up and say we are Americans and we have a right to debate and disagree with any administration!" -------------Hillary Clinton.

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To share your finds or NOT?
Posted by: Jim Vokes NY
Date: April 19, 2012 06:20PM
Another issue that should be thought about is when seeking permission is how to answer the question. "I want a share of your finds!

At first I always thought NO WAY which is actually a personal decision that could be answered many ways depending on the circumstances.

Hey, I paid $xxx.xx for the detector and I spent the hours of learning time and the hours in the field in the mud, the heat and the snow so NO WAY will I share.

Now I know that others feel differently and that is OK for them.

As I became older and had found many many coins, artifacts and jewelry, I changed my answer in some instances.

If the owner told me about a stash hidden by a father or grandfather etc. and wanted me to specifically look for it, I would make the deal if I thought the split was right. If an owner told me of a Ring etc. and could describe it, I might agree if I could keep everything else I find. If they couldn't describe it specifically, NO DEAL! If the site was really a great historical site, I might return all finds to the owner as long as I could take picture of my finds for my pleasure. I have done several of these as well as returning an item like a Ring etc. that I was asked to look for (sometimes I took a reward offered and sometimes not)! I always asked for permission to do the entire area after the find if the property looked like it could be rewarding.

Just something to think about before asking permission.. Good Luck!





-------------------------- "Be patient! God isn't finished with me yet!"

"I am sick and tired of people who say that if you debate and you disagree with this administration somehow you're not patriotic. We should stand up and say we are Americans and we have a right to debate and disagree with any administration!" -------------Hillary Clinton.

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Re: permission
Posted by: sgoss66
Date: April 19, 2012 07:03PM
Jim --

Just read your letter, thanks for sharing. It's nearly identical to one I use, but you included a couple of ideas and phrases that I really like, and will include in mine. Also, the idea of "follow-up call" is a great one, as often I don't hear back, but a follow-up call with reference back to the letter is a GREAT idea...

Steve



Minelab CTX 3030
Minelab Equinox 800
Garrett ProPointer AT
Lesche hand digger
Lesche 38D Ground Shark "King of Spades"

Norman, OK

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Re: I never say dig holes LOL
Posted by: Jim Vokes NY
Date: April 22, 2012 04:57PM
Like a lot of other detectorist, I have found rings and things that I really believe were family property. It is a wonderful feeling when I see there eyes light up or tear up! Just sayin...



-------------------------- "Be patient! God isn't finished with me yet!"

"I am sick and tired of people who say that if you debate and you disagree with this administration somehow you're not patriotic. We should stand up and say we are Americans and we have a right to debate and disagree with any administration!" -------------Hillary Clinton.

Re: permission
Posted by: kingingkunsan
Date: February 16, 2013 11:00AM
Right on! I was just considering doing exactly this. Thanks Jim I will try the letter. My first area of attack is going to be fields, so the tearing up the yard part should not be an issue. But of course I will still do my best to leave it looking untouched. Good luck to all.

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