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Civil War Gold
Posted by: hawgdawg
Date: October 09, 2018 08:11PM
I don't know how to post links , but I read an article today , where 2 guys in Pennsylvania have been searching for some lost Union gold. They thought they had found it , got in touch with the FBI , for some reason , they brought out someone with some kind of Ground a Penetrating Radar , they detected something , very large , deep , with the same readings and composition of a large cache of gold. These guys said they just wanted to watch the gold being dug up. Supposedly , the FBI brought in a backhoe , and for 2 days , wouldn't let the guys back to the site. The 1 st day digging , the FBI said everybody was cold and going home. So the 2 guys left. And according to a neighbor close to the property , the FBI worked all that nite. That's not the whole story . Anybody else hear of this ???

Re: Civil War Gold
Posted by: Tom_in_CA
Date: October 09, 2018 09:11PM
Quote
hawgdawg
..... Anybody else hear of this ???

Hawgdawg, The story is utter ghost-story legend nonsense. 2 clowns go out chasing a silly legend. They go out with magic wands (dowsing) and whatever-other-instruments, think they got signals. Well, ... OF COURSE it's got to be the millions in dollars of gold, right ? Just like Oak Island, Just like Yamashita, etc.... But then ......... durned that govt. red tape . Because, of course , it's all a grand conspiracy by the govt. to 'keep the treasure for themselves', right ? Otherwise, why ELSE would they say "no" to digging on govt. land ? I smell a conspiracy, don't you :rolleyes:

And then notice that whenever they ("Finderskeepers") posts, it's always phrased in the past tense "found". Yet , ask him : "How much gold have you actually brought to the surface , looked at, held, etc... ?" ABSOLUTELY NONE ! Because in their mind's eyes, having a legend, a treasure map, some cryptogram clues, some shady government coverup claims, a supposed signal on their instruments, etc.... all means that they've "found" (past tense) a treasure. It's narrowed down to a certain meadow, or certain cave, or certain lake bottom, etc.... . Now it's merely a matter of getting heavy equipment go 50 ft. deep through solid rock. Or a detector that goes 6 meters deep. Or overcoming govt. hurdles. But rest assured, they've "found" (past tense) something.

And when they couldn't get govt. clearances to do some crazy exploit, they went and made a big stink to the media. Till finally, they get one or two to muse "Have 2 men found the lost treasure of such & such ?". Which people like you, take to mean in the affirmative "found" (past tense). But when you read closer, NOTHING'S BEEN FOUND. And after they make a big stink to LEO agencies, media, etc.... then they can point to the "smoke" as evidence of a "fire". But the truth is : THEY'RE the ones "making the smoke". A big stink about nothing.

It's just ghost story nonsense. They are a black eye embarrassment to the md'ing hobby.

Re: Civil War Gold
Posted by: hawgdawg
Date: October 09, 2018 10:37PM
Ok,,,thanks for clearing that up,,,,,

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Re: Civil War Gold
Posted by: Elton
Date: October 09, 2018 10:45PM
President Abraham Lincoln reportedly ordered the gold shipment for payment to Union Army soldiers, Dennis Parada has been cited in news reports as saying. (AP)

MODERN DAY SEARCH TURNS UP 'NOTHING' -- BUT WAS THERE REALLY SOMETHING THERE?

Parada, a longtime fortune hunter, reportedly became interested in the legend in 1975 after hearing it from a man who walked into the furniture store where he had worked.

At the end of the court-sanctioned excavation in March though, the FBI escorted the treasure hunters to the snow-covered site and asked them what they saw. They gazed at the pit. Not so much as a glimmer of gold dust, let alone the tons of precious metal they said the contractor's instruments had detected.

"We were embarrassed," Dennis Parada told The Associated Press. "They walk us in, and they make us look like dummies. Like we messed up."

Since that day, however, neighbors' accounts of late-night excavation and FBI convoys have fueled suspicions that the agency isn't telling the whole truth.

"After my years of experience here using equipment, there was something here, something here of value, some kind of precious metal. And whatever it is, it's gone now. And that's what I want to get to the bottom of, is what was in that hole," Kem Parada said.

The FBI said at the conclusion of its excavation “nothing was found” and the bureau repeated that statement when reached Tuesday by Fox News.

"FBI investigators must follow the facts. The fact here, as previously stated, is that nothing was found in the excavation. The FBI unequivocally rejects any claims or speculation to the contrary," a statement from the FBI's Philadelphia Division said. "While we felt it important to respond to the false supposition promulgated in a media report today, as this matter is related to an ongoing investigation, any additional comment would be inappropriate at this time."

The Associated Press reported a bureau spokeswoman told them last week court documents related to the dig are sealed.

The news agency says the Paradas spent five years digging in a cave on state land, and two more years drilling atop the cave, before going to the FBI in January with their evidence which eventually led to the court-ordered excavation.

The treasure hunters and Getler said they had an agreement with the FBI to watch the excavation. Officers instead confined them to their car — out of sight of the wooded hillside where a backhoe was digging — for six hours that first day before they were finally allowed up the hill. The digging proceeded for another hour before an agent called an abrupt halt at 3 p.m., saying the team was cold, tired and hungry and it would be getting dark soon. They were just 3 feet from the target.

"I said, 'You've got three hours of daylight and we're only 3 feet away,'" Dennis Parada recalled. He said the agent replied, "Denny, we're going, we're going."

Whether the FBI actually left the woods that afternoon is itself an open question.

"I don't understand why they played that game on us." -- Dennis Parada on the FBI

Cheryl Elder, who lives nearby, told the Associated Press she heard what sounded like a backhoe and jackhammer at least until 2 a.m. — the noisy machinery keeping her awake and annoying her because she had to rise early for work — and she saw that the hillside was brightly lit.

"It was just real loud all night," the former constable recalled. "It was driving me nuts."

The second day of the excavation was similar to the first, according to the Paradas and Getler. They said they were confined to their car for several hours, then escorted up the hill to the dig site — by then a large, empty hole. The FBI had finished the excavation out of their presence, they said.

The Paradas said they were cheated of a moment they had spent years working for.

"You can only dig the gold up once, and that's a historical moment. And here we were robbed of all that," Dennis Parada told the Associated Press. "I don't understand why they played that game on us."

After the Paradas and Getler had left, Elder said, she saw a half-dozen black SUVs at the site. One by one, she said, they backed up to the bottom of the hill and rendezvoused with one of several all-terrain utility vehicles. Elder tried using her binoculars, but couldn't make out what investigators were transferring from the ATVs to the SUVs.

Heather Selle, who lives in nearby Weedville, said she was getting her kids ready for school on the morning of the second day when she spied a convoy of FBI vehicles driving past — including two large armored trucks.

"There was too many people involved, there was too much hush-hush, and there's been too much seen," said still another resident, Garrett Osche, whose garage was used as a staging ground for the FBI's initial foray to the Dents Run area weeks before the dig. "Why do you close the road down if you're not loading something out? If you're not sneaking something, why do you need to do what they did?"

If Union gold was indeed recovered from the woods, the discovery of a historic and extremely valuable trove of federal property on state-owned land would almost certainly touch off a court battle over who owns it, and whether the Paradas are entitled to a cut.

In May, Cluck filed a Freedom of Information Act request for documents on the FBI's investigation into the legendary gold. The agency demurred, claiming it had no files it could share. Cluck appealed to Republican U.S. Sen. Pat Toomey for help, and, a few weeks ago, the Justice Department ordered the FBI to do a more thorough review. If the bureau determines there are documents it can turn over after all, it could still take months or years to reach that point.



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Re: Civil War Gold
Posted by: Big Treble
Date: October 10, 2018 07:00AM
Quote
Tom_in_CA
..... Anybody else hear of this ???

Hawgdawg, The story is utter ghost-story legend nonsense. 2 clowns go out chasing a silly legend. They go out with magic wands (dowsing) and whatever-other-instruments, think they got signals. Well, ... OF COURSE it's got to be the millions in dollars of gold, right ? Just like Oak Island, Just like Yamashita, etc.... But then ......... durned that govt. red tape . Because, of course , it's all a grand conspiracy by the govt. to 'keep the treasure for themselves', right ? Otherwise, why ELSE would they say "no" to digging on govt. land ? I smell a conspiracy, don't you :rolleyes:

And then notice that whenever they ("Finderskeepers") posts, it's always phrased in the past tense "found". Yet , ask him : "How much gold have you actually brought to the surface , looked at, held, etc... ?" ABSOLUTELY NONE ! Because in their mind's eyes, having a legend, a treasure map, some cryptogram clues, some shady government coverup claims, a supposed signal on their instruments, etc.... all means that they've "found" (past tense) a treasure. It's narrowed down to a certain meadow, or certain cave, or certain lake bottom, etc.... . Now it's merely a matter of getting heavy equipment go 50 ft. deep through solid rock. Or a detector that goes 6 meters deep. Or overcoming govt. hurdles. But rest assured, they've "found" (past tense) something.

And when they couldn't get govt. clearances to do some crazy exploit, they went and made a big stink to the media. Till finally, they get one or two to muse "Have 2 men found the lost treasure of such & such ?". Which people like you, take to mean in the affirmative "found" (past tense). But when you read closer, NOTHING'S BEEN FOUND. And after they make a big stink to LEO agencies, media, etc.... then they can point to the "smoke" as evidence of a "fire". But the truth is : THEY'RE the ones "making the smoke". A big stink about nothing.

It's just ghost story nonsense. They are a black eye embarrassment to the md'ing hobby.

Exactly, nearly all of the so called legends are BS, and I many times question the issues the finders have internally.............plus fo me I know the lost box cars with Confederate Gold (now worth 300 million) are burried within 5 miles of my house in SW WI. The only reason I haven't got to it, is because I have to dig around the stupid $5 million viking hoard, the Vikings put on top of it.

Re: Civil War Gold
Posted by: Tom_in_CA
Date: October 10, 2018 07:35AM
Ha. And here's where they muddy the issue : IF AND WHEN you convince them of some weak link in the story (something that doesn't add up, or isn't factually historic), here's what they will say next :

"It's just a matter of sorting the fact from fiction". Right ? Which rings rhetorically true to the casual reader/md'r. BUT WAIT: This fails to take into account that ALL treasure legends have certain true parts. They are ALL built around real names, dates, events, right ? But does that mean there's a treasure ? NO . So you can "separate fact from fiction" all you want. But if there's no treasure, then there's no treasure.

For example: Back in the 1970s, when Treasure magazines were FILLED with "lost mine" and "stolen stage loot" stories, a buddy of mine submitted one of those stories. In order to get the $100 article submission/acceptance pay. To do it, he merely wrote a fanciful story based on some actual event. Added some faded newspaper clippings, various "... It has been said that..." type musings. And topped it off with a drawing of a miner posed next to a burro. Ok, now it MUST be true, right ? And if someone goes to check on the historical accuracy of names, dates, events, they will find much that's "true", right ? Hence the treasure must exist, right ?

We got a good laugh out of that, wondering whether anyone ever actually went looking for that. Now in THAT case, if was just for fun and creative writing (ie.: willfully done). But I propose that the SAME phenomenon can take place just via the telephone game syndrome. "Treasure" after all, wilts common sense. People want *so* hard to believe, that they put aside common sense critical thinking. Because, let's face it: No one wants to be "left out" , or "laughed at all the way to the bank". So we subconsciously retain the "what if?" remote possibilities in our minds. That's why , historically, when it comes to treasures, the telephone game is 10x more likely to evolve. ANY suggestion, will in a short time, become "an absolute certainty".



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 10/10/2018 07:35AM by Tom_in_CA.

Re: Civil War Gold
Posted by: Tom_in_CA
Date: October 10, 2018 07:50AM
This is just so hilarious. See how that works ? NO AMOUNT OF PROOF that nothing was there, will EVER convince those clowns (and duped readers) from conjecturing some remote contingency of how:

1) it was surreptitiously removed, in secret, by a grand conspiracy (that's the ticket !)

2) it's just "3 ft. deeper", yet you stopped digging too soon.

3) A little more the right.

4) A little more to the left.

It's NEVER that it's simply not there, or simply wasn't there. The entire STARTING POINT PREMISE, is that a treasure most certainly exists(ed). No amount of evidence can disprove that. They will always find some far-fetched way where it was secreted out in the night. Black helicopters, tin-foil hats, etc..... Reminds me of Oak Island. No matter HOW much digging is done, all failure doesn't mean anything. It just points to the ingenuity of the persons who buried it 300 yrs. ago. And no matter HOW much a critic points out the unlikeliness of various scenarios (logistically speaking ), the "faithful" will find some incredible remote way, where such a stunt could be carried out . Eg.: They "built the pyramids, didn't they?" Etc...

And in the mind's of the faithful, unless you disprove all their far-fetched incredible fancied theories (as being "impossible"), then presto: A treasure most certainly exists. Well gee, I can conceivably walk backwards all the way from San Francisco to New York. It's *theoretically* possible. But would I ? Is it plausible ? The fact that you can't DISPROVE that I pulled this stunt, does that mean that I, of necessity, DID do that feat ? No. Of course not.

So the standard that the faithful try to put on the skeptics, is un-reasonable. To say that , unless the critic can DIS-prove all sorts of crazy conjectures (as somehow *impossible*), does NOT mean that ... therefore, the end-claim is, of necessity, true.

Re: Civil War Gold
Posted by: hawgdawg
Date: October 10, 2018 10:02AM
Yes sir Elton. That's the article I read. Thanks for posting it .
To Tom,,,thanks for your input . I was just asking if anyone else had seen this story , which is why posted pieces of it . I didn't know , and still don't know how old this story was or is. I do know how stories and rumors start . Thanks for your input

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