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I have a question about depth of coins in farm fields
Posted by: Mark in S.E. IA
Date: November 17, 2009 07:49PM
Do you guy's that MD farm fields find pennies and dimes much deeper then 3" deep. I have been MD'ing farm fields for 3 years now and most of the small coins that I have found in the fields were 3" deep or less. I have found a few that were a little deeper then 3" deep, but not very many. The bean field that I was working Fri an Sat. I found 2 silver dimes, 4 IH's and 3 wheat's and all of those coins were 3" deep or less. The only coin that I found that was deeper was the shield nickel and it was a good 6" deep. I use the 10.5 DD MF coil and sometimes it's hard to keep it close to the ground, so Sunday I put on the stock coil because it's a little smaller and went back over a good size area in that field and I didn't find any more coins. I know that their has to be more small coins in that field that are deeper then 3" deep.

I just can't figure out why I am not getting better depth on the pennies and dimes, in the farm fields. Anybody got any ideas on what I can do?



HH
Mark

Etrac

X-505
10.5 DD 7.5 coil

Maybe the plowing brings them up and are not any deeper...
Posted by: John(Tx)
Date: November 17, 2009 08:23PM
I know I have found silver dimes at old church lots at a measured 7". Hope this helps. HH

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Re: I have a question about depth of coins in farm fields
Posted by: Digger
Date: November 17, 2009 11:41PM
My brother and I have been cussing and discussing this subject for many years. Like you, most of the finds we make in bean and corn fields are 5 inches or less. Occassionally I've dug deeper coins, but most of them are fairly shallow. In my opinion, part of the reason could be that the soil has been disturbed, possibly creating a "confusing" ground matrix to the detector. Secondly is that most of the fields have an uneven surface. This usually causes us to keep the coil an inch or so higher than usual to keep the coil from getting snagged up in the stubble.(even higher in corn stalks) And third, your sweep elevation is limited by the stubble or stalks left in each row. By that I mean you usually end up "dipping" the coil in the middle of the sweep and raising it at the ends. What I ended up doing last week, when I found that SL dime and those IH cents, was to lock in my ground balance manually and keep checking it every couple rows. I don't want tracking on when I can't keep a constant coil elevation. Next, I turned my sensitivity to the max and lowered the Threshold so it was just barely humming. (one setting lower than I usually hunt with) I also made a conscious effort to work each row in more of a diagonal pattern. Primarily because it allowed for me to make a longer sweep. But also because the coil would deflect off of the stalks more easily than hitting them dead-on.

I know you don't like to hunt in all metal with multiple tones, but I'm convinced that it is the deepest setup for this type of hunting. Having the higher sensitivity "compensates" for raising the coil over the stubble. Lowering the Threshold to a barely audible hum keeps the false signals at a minimum. (more of a problem when hitting corn ctalks than bean stubble) when you change direction at the edges of each row. All metal makes you more aware of where all the adjacent targets are located. And the multiple tones will allow you to "discriminate" with your ears instead of worrying about numbers on a display. Stopping to resweep a target that has been discriminated (nulled) out by a Pattern, or to look at the display, just interferes with a consistent overlapping "row hunt".

It would be interesting to have X-Ray vision just to see the depth of the coins in a field. They first land on top of the ground, when they're lost. The wind blows, the rains fall and they begin their descent into the earth. They are tilled under at varying depths, depending on the equipment used and where they "fall" in the furrow. In dry years, they fall into the cracks and simply disappear. And year after year after year, the formula becomes more complex. Frankly, I suspect some fields that have been plowed for generations probably have as many coins still hiding at depths of 8 inches as there are in the top 8 inches. And now that farmers are using minimum till techniques, we're likely to never find them. Some of the fields I hunt, I've been hunting (off and on) for the better part of 30 years. Not to sound arrogant, but I consider myself to be a pretty thorough coin shooter. When I go back to a field and find a handful of coins, I have mixed emotions. First, I am tickled to have found more coins in a spot that I thought I'd beat to death. Then I get wondering how I could have missed them so many times before. If they happen to be in line with the corn this year, they should have been in between the rows of beans last year. And if so, and I walked down the middle of the rows, how did I miss them? Did I get lazy and not overlap my swaths enough? Or did I just not hit that row? I know there are a lot of rows in an 80 acre field. (30 inch rows..... you can do the math). But to think of how many times I've been over the same sites, with a dozen or more detectors, and still come out with coins simply amazes me. Again, I'm not trying to sound like I'm bragging, but that seated dime I found in that field last week was the 20th seated dime I've taken from there. Besides the dozens of Indians, several two-cent pieces, a nickel 3-cent piece, quite a few shield nickels and a couple seated quarters. And that is just me. There are others who have hunted it. Like I said, on one hand it makes me frustrated. But on the other hand, it gives me a place to go back to next year. And the next year. And the next year. etc. etc. etc. My best advice is to keep the coil as close to the ground as possible, run with the Sensitivity set as high as tolerable, lower the Threshold to minimize the falsing caused by the higher Sensitivity and coil movement, constantly monitor your GB (but don't run tracking) and set up to hear the most information your detector can provide. And lastly, hope that the price of fuel goes down and they all start plowing again. :lol: Just remember, you won't get them all this year. But you'll get more than the guys who don't understand hunting a rough 80 acre farm field is much different than hunting a city park. JMHO HH Randy



You'll never know for sure......unless you dig it! HH "Digger"




After more than 46-years of detecting, and having owned dozens of different detectors, I've come to the conclusion that maintaining success in the field is largely dependent on three things..... choice of site, acquiring a proper skill set for the detector and the detector itself..... in that order. Research, practice and persistence. There are no substitutes.

Re: I have a question about depth of coins in farm fields
Posted by: Mtnmn
Date: November 18, 2009 06:59AM
I have found coins in corn fields down to 5 inches deep using the 6" DD coil. The down side is you can't cover much ground with it, but it is easy to use in and around corn stubble and is great for finding coins in among pieces of iron.

Re: I have a question about depth of coins in farm fields
Posted by: SteveP(NH)
Date: November 18, 2009 07:29AM
I hunt a lot of farm land that was first settled and cleared in the late 1600's or early 1700's and regularly find coins deeper than 3". In fact most of the colonial era coins I find are deeper than 8", though I did find a 1726 Hibernia half penny at 6 inches. Note that the coins I am referring to have been found using several different detectors. I won a XT 705 at a hunt last April and so have only been using it since then and I use other detectors besides it as well so I probably only have 50 hours or so on it now.

I normally use the 3 Khz coil when I am using the XT 705. I've been hunting a campground that is located on what was farmland prior to 1960 and have found dozens of modern coins at the 4" to 6" using the XT. I do have a 10.5" MF DD but have only used it once because it is too heavy and unbalances the detector. To tell you the truth I use a Tek T2 most of the time cause it is better suited to my hunting style and goes deeper in my soils (low mineralization). I have found Indian Head Cents with it down to 11" (as measured by the detector and the hole looked about that deep) with it.

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Re: I have a question about depth of coins in farm fields
Posted by: Mark in S.E. IA
Date: November 18, 2009 10:34AM
Thank You very much Randy for your reply. It has given me a better understanding on why I'm not getting the depth on the smaller coins that I am use too. I have always felt that it had something to do with the fact that the soil is being disturbed year after year and causing the ground matrix to be all mixed up. I also believe in the halo effect and with the coins being moved around year after year they don't have the time to build up a good halo.

I'm going to give all of your tips a try and yes I well use AM the next time I am in a field, lol. I don't know why but I don't check my GB very much when I'm in a farm field. I check it all time when I'm MD'ing yards, schools and parks.

Also, I like hearing about all of the great coins that you have found over the years in that 80 acre field / old fairgrounds. I especially liked hearing about that sweet lookin 1877 IH cent that you found last week. WOW, what a find that was.

Thanks again Randy for your help that you have given me and others on this great forum. I think that you should put your reply somewhere in the FAQ section. Their is a lot of good info in your reply that can help a lot of people that are working farm fields or thinking about working fields.



HH
Mark

Etrac

X-505
10.5 DD 7.5 coil

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Re: I have a question about depth of coins in farm fields
Posted by: Digger
Date: November 18, 2009 02:55PM
Thanks for the kind words Mark. I put a link to that post up in the FAQFAQ section. Let me know if any of those adjustments make a difference. HH Randy



You'll never know for sure......unless you dig it! HH "Digger"




After more than 46-years of detecting, and having owned dozens of different detectors, I've come to the conclusion that maintaining success in the field is largely dependent on three things..... choice of site, acquiring a proper skill set for the detector and the detector itself..... in that order. Research, practice and persistence. There are no substitutes.

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Re: I have a question about depth of coins in farm fields
Posted by: Goes4ever
Date: November 18, 2009 03:46PM
Mark, 90% of what I find in fields in 3-4" or less, I find a lot of times coins are right on top the ground, farmers do not till much around here, but even when they just work the fields, they are going into the ground an easy 5" So I believe that is why coins never get very deep. One reason I love fields. I always GB when I am in fields just like I am in a yard, why wouldn't you?

why not use tracking Randy? I always do everywhere I hunt?

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Re: I have a question about depth of coins in farm fields
Posted by: Mark in S.E. IA
Date: November 18, 2009 04:09PM
With all of the rain we got in the last few day's It's going to be a few day's before I get back in to the fields, but I'll let you know how things go when I do.

Today I was working a ball field for a few hrs before it started to rain again and I was running in AM the whole time I was out there too get myself use to it and it didn't go to bad. I found a Merc that had a small piece of metal about 2" off too the side, a rosie, a wheat and some clad.



HH
Mark

Etrac

X-505
10.5 DD 7.5 coil

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Re: I have a question about depth of coins in farm fields
Posted by: Mark in S.E. IA
Date: November 18, 2009 04:35PM
Quote
Goes4ever
Mark, 90% of what I find in fields in 3-4" or less, I find a lot of times coins are right on top the ground, farmers do not till much around here, but even when they just work the fields, they are going into the ground an easy 5" So I believe that is why coins never get very deep. One reason I love fields. I always GB when I am in fields just like I am in a yard, why wouldn't you?

why not use tracking Randy? I always do everywhere I hunt?

Terry, I GB everytime when I first start at a place, fields, yards, schools, parks, where ever I'm at, but for some reason when I'm in a field I don't check it all that much, but I do when I'm at other places.

Farmers a round here don't till much either, but they only started doing that about 20 or so years ago. Before that they plowed almost every year and them old plows went deep. Like Randy said, it would be interesting to have X-RAY vision too see how deep those really coins are. I'll bet their is coins in those field that are 12" and deeeeeper



HH
Mark

Etrac

X-505
10.5 DD 7.5 coil

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Re: I have a question about depth of coins in farm fields
Posted by: Goes4ever
Date: November 18, 2009 04:36PM
ok so why not use tracking?

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Re: I have a question about depth of coins in farm fields
Posted by: Terra1959
Date: November 18, 2009 06:29PM
Hi there,

Hope you dont mind if I chime in with a question...
I have been using tracking mostly when hunting lately.( on land and on beaches)
Should I GB the machine first then press the tracking button on and go
OR , dont worry about GB first - just put the tracking on and go ???
I have been doing the first one.
Thanks, sorry if its a dumb question.

Terra 1959

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Just put the tracking on and go.....
Posted by: Digger
Date: November 18, 2009 10:00PM
Even if you set the GB first, once you pressed tracking it would take over the controls and likely replace the ground phase setting you took the time to set! I use to spend time setting my GB manually. Lately, I've pressed tracking, swept over a clean area a couple swaths, then turned off the tracking. The reason I turn it off is because I prefer to hunt with the GB set. Just a personal preference for the type of places I hunt. JMHO HH Randy



You'll never know for sure......unless you dig it! HH "Digger"




After more than 46-years of detecting, and having owned dozens of different detectors, I've come to the conclusion that maintaining success in the field is largely dependent on three things..... choice of site, acquiring a proper skill set for the detector and the detector itself..... in that order. Research, practice and persistence. There are no substitutes.

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