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Ever wonder what you
Posted by: Digger
Date: August 08, 2007 03:10PM
I enjoy discussing various aspects of our hobby and appreciate the friendships we make through this forum. But, as I rethink some of the questions I've responded to, I ask myself if I really answered some of them as thoroughly as I could have? Particularly those asking about TID and discrimination. And especially since I am an advocate of using my X-Terra



You'll never know for sure......unless you dig it! HH "Digger"




After more than 46-years of detecting, and having owned dozens of different detectors, I've come to the conclusion that maintaining success in the field is largely dependent on three things..... choice of site, acquiring a proper skill set for the detector and the detector itself..... in that order. Research, practice and persistence. There are no substitutes.



Edited 3 time(s). Last edit at 08/08/2007 03:54PM by Digger.

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Re: Ever wonder what you
Posted by: Beale
Date: August 08, 2007 04:16PM
This was a very good read for me. I have ordered the X-Terra 70 and am trying to learn as much as I can about this detector.

My question is this. If I run in all metal mode and "dig it all" why have all the bells and whistles? If I GB like I should, and run my sens like I should. Do I still run in all metal?

As a newb I really am just wanting a honest opinion. I want to find coins, jewelery (I hope), maybe even a relic if possible. Will these items show up in all metal?

Thanks in advance, Beale.

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I suggest.....
Posted by: Digger
Date: August 08, 2007 04:35PM
that you go up a couple posts to FAQFAQ. In FAQFAQ, you will find a "collection" of individual posts made on the X-Terra. Even though you are getting the X-70, you might take a look at the articles I wrote on coinshooting for the X-30 and X-50, as well as coinshooting with the X-70. If you still have some questions, don't hesitate to ask. HH Randy



You'll never know for sure......unless you dig it! HH "Digger"




After more than 46-years of detecting, and having owned dozens of different detectors, I've come to the conclusion that maintaining success in the field is largely dependent on three things..... choice of site, acquiring a proper skill set for the detector and the detector itself..... in that order. Research, practice and persistence. There are no substitutes.

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Re: I suggest.....
Posted by: Beale
Date: August 08, 2007 06:16PM
Thanks for pointing me to the faq faq. I just read your coinshooting on the X-Terras. Very well written Some of it I am still struggling with, but I am sure with time I will get it.

I will say this. You sure know your X-Terra products. Thanks again, Beale.

Re: Ever wonder what you
Posted by: Mick in Dubbo
Date: August 08, 2007 08:36PM
That's quite a good point to make Digger.
To add couple of thoughts to that. I wasn't till I bought my X-Terra 30 (just after they they came out) that I was really having success in this hobby. Although I have had considerable frustration with my particular unit (which may lead to me dumping this particular company if it continues) having a tid to my mind gives us a great advantage in the hobby. Yes we tend to fall into our own little habits which can limit what we come home with, I think the key, is to always be curious. That will keep us from getting bored of finding the same things day in, day out. Although I've been swinging my Ace mostly for the last 9 months, there is a lot of transferable skills that closely resemble the X_Terra's.
Something that we often say to somebody new to the hobby, is to dig repeatable signals that don't bounce anymore than the next notch. Same applies to depth reading. A lot of people glaze over this point without realising it's impact of our ability to find good targets. What I am saying, is that we fall into the habit, particularly coin hunters, of only digging up targets in a certain spot on the discriminator. As I've gained experience with the Ace, I now find that pretty much, if a target gives a steady reading, then I often finding that I'm digging it up without being fully aware of were it is on the TID! Apart from iron and foil targets, that now seems to be a lot less important now. I remember, when I first got the X-Terra, I was a lot more fussy about what I dug. Being less fussy allows for rings and the like to show up, even if you dig a bit more rubbish. It puts the adventure and sense of wonderment in the hobby, and the ability to to be more discerning if you want be.
Mick Evans.

Beale, part of what Randy (Digger) was saying is
Posted by: Monte
Date: August 09, 2007 09:37AM
in an ideal environment and with all targets in an ideal positron, not too deep and not masked by any other nearby metal object, and with uniform ground, those targets made up on non-ferrous metals and with a high percentage of a primary metal, will usually "read" or "ID" quite consistently.

In those cases you can make good use of any make/model Target ID system, and the X-Terra 70's 28 notch segments can be put to good use to accept and reject certain targets as desired.

However, as Randy also pointed out, not all targets will be of a nice and proper metal make-up, not all ground conditions will be favorable or uniform, and there are too many chances for target masking from trash, other good targets, etc., etc.

In short, you need to master your detector and that means not just knowing what it can do, but when it can and when it can't. In situations when it can't, you need to recover more targets (use less discrimination) and not rely on TID lock-on results (dig the 'iffy' responders).

My question is this. If I run in all metal mode and "dig it all" why have all the bells and whistles?... An overused term, ... "bells and whistles" ... it really isn't fitting for the X-Terra 70 or XLT or any other make and model. What some models have are a lot of features/functions and it is certain that not everyone will understand them, and in some cases, with some models, they might be considered excess or useless. However, in the case of the X-Terra 70, all of the functions it provides are useful, or at least can be in certain applications.

You will have the additional features for those times and situations when they are needed or wanted.

If I GB like I should, and run my sens like I should. Do I still run in all metal?... That's up to you but, like Randy and some other dedicated detectorists, I generally search in All Metal with the X-Terra 70 like I do with most any make and model. Why? Because you can get better depth and you will also hear targets a little better that you sweep close to, allowing you to redirect your sweep to check them out. Also, I like to know of there are some iron targets at a site that can cause masking of a nearby desirable target. By hunting in All Metal you will know that iron is present, or any other type of metal, and that let's me make a metal note of the conditions and listen for questionable audio responses.

As a newb I really am just wanting a honest opinion. I want to find coins, jewelery (I hope), maybe even a relic if possible. Will these items show up in all metal?... Yep! :) EVERYTHING metal is going to respond if you hunt in All Metal, which is still a motion-based, non-rejecting motion discriminate mode.

Personally, I favor the two-tone audio ID option for most searches/ I like to "hear it all" and then make a decision based on the responses I get.

Naturally, there will be times when I limit the amount of iron acceptance. For example, when I work a couple of my favorite ghost towns, one of which I have had hunted since May 4th of 1969, I know them well and the iron trash is abundant. I like to use a minimum amount of rejection at them, and with the X-Terra 70 that meant rejecting -8, -6 and -4. I accept -2 on up in most of these types of settings.

The X-Terra 70 allows you reasonable good adjustment to work most any site, and when the new 6" coils get in everyone's arsenals (and probably used 90% of the time) I think we're going to see the X-Terra 70 finally be accepted by more hobbyists.

Congratulations on your new X-Terra 70 choice. Please, take the time to really learn it, and your hunting environments, and I'm sure you will really enjoy your new detector. :)

Monte

Re: Ever wonder what you
Posted by: fredm
Date: August 09, 2007 09:55AM
Digger, your compass vrs ruler explanation is most excellent! I think that it makes more sense when trying to explain why the discriminator is "fooled" by large iron targets.
thanks
Fred

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Re: Ever wonder what you
Posted by: Beale
Date: August 09, 2007 10:51AM
Thanks for the response Monte and Randy. This is a great site for learning the X-terra on.

I really am excited to get mine and look foward to the hunt, Beale.

Re: Ever wonder what you
Posted by: eebee
Date: August 09, 2007 11:38PM
WOW !
Thanks for the dissertation Digger. I'm trying out a friends X terra 70 before buying my own. I've kept it in pattern 2, but after reading your comments, I think I'll change the setting. Is pattern 1 any better or worse than all-metal for coin shooting a park or beach ?
thanks

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You can modify any of the Patterns.....
Posted by: Digger
Date: August 10, 2007 12:02AM
to adapt to the site you are hunting. If you start out with any of the preset discrimination PATTERNS, you can change an accepted notch segment to be either accepted or rejected. The easiest way to set up your a PATTERN is to simply select the one you want to modify, press the + or - pads to scroll through the notch segments and select the TID number you want to change. The TID number will flash when you stop on it. If that number has an X beside it, it is already rejected. To change it to accepted, simply press the ACCEPT/REJECT pad. If there is no X beside it, it is an accepted notch segment. If you want to change it to a rejected notch segment, again, just press the ACCEPT/REJECT pad. When you get that number the way you want it, just scroll (using + or - pads) to another TID number and repeat the process of ACCEPT or REJECT until you have built the PATTERN you want. You can see what numbers are rejected by looking for the dark segment bars at the bottom of the screen. Blank ones represent accepted target notch segments. Once you get them all set like you want, simply press the PINPOINT/DETECT pad and start hunting. When you shut off the detector, your accepted and rejected notch segments will be kept in memory, in the Pattern you chose to modify. To erase the custom patterns and reset the X-70 back to the default Patterns, simply hold the PATTERN pad down when you turn on the detector. During the startup process, release the PATTERN pad. The letters PE (PATTERNS ERASED) will appear for a few seconds on the LCD and you will be back in the factory preset PATTERNS.

Personally, I hunt with 4 tones in all metal. It is simply a matter of preference as to whether you want to hear all the sounds or only the tones made by accepted targets. If I were going to run in a preset PATTERN, number 1 would be my choice. It accepts all conductive targets and rejects ferrous. HH Randy



You'll never know for sure......unless you dig it! HH "Digger"




After more than 46-years of detecting, and having owned dozens of different detectors, I've come to the conclusion that maintaining success in the field is largely dependent on three things..... choice of site, acquiring a proper skill set for the detector and the detector itself..... in that order. Research, practice and persistence. There are no substitutes.

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Excellent post Monte!! belongs on the faqfaq page
Posted by: Jackpine Savage
Date: August 10, 2007 05:59AM
All very good advice and I agree with only one minor change.

For me personally when hunting heavy iron on those days when I can't tolerate constant iron tones I notch out the one segment that causes most of the "irritation" at that particular site be it -8 -6 or whatever. Other than that You got it!

HH Tom



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 08/10/2007 06:01AM by Jackpine Savage.

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Re: I suggest.....
Posted by: Jackpine Savage
Date: August 10, 2007 06:14AM
Beale

As a newbie you have a lot of info to absorb so don't feel that you have to understand everything about detectors right away. Most of what you read on the forums (and in the manual) will start to make sense after using the detector for a while. Getting out and spending time with the detector is the best way to learn. It can be confusing at first so don't fret it if it takes a while for all the audio info you hear to make sense. Keep your settings simple at first until you learn what its telling you.

First and foremost practice good coil control right off the bat. All detectors need a smooth well controlled sweep at the proper speed for best results.

Tom

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All Metal All the Time??? Life's too short!:rofl::rofl::devil:
Posted by: BarnacleBill
Date: August 10, 2007 06:24AM
Why not just go for the gusto and get a D7 & High Banker?????:razz::razz:

Re: I suggest.....
Posted by: RLOH
Date: August 10, 2007 06:32AM
Tom, I wholeheartedly agree on your statement about coil control. I hadley ever hear this part of detector set-up mentioned. In my opinion coil control is the most basic adjustment and one of the most important things any detectorist can and should master. I have seen people whip their CZ's like a XLT, with the coil 4 inches off the ground. Every detector has a different sweep speed and I have seen many that are so sensitive to centering the target, that if not perfectly and I mean perfectly centered, you will not get an accurate target ID with audio or VDI's. R.L.

Randy, outstanding writing! Thanks and that is bound to help some folks here.N/T
Posted by: jeff & Maria
Date: August 10, 2007 10:05AM

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