Findmall.com
 
 






Vintage Detecting Forum


Welcome! Log In Register
avatar
Is the interest in vintage metal detectors on the decline?
Posted by: straker
Date: December 30, 2017 01:09PM
I own a few metal detectors built from the mid 1980s to early 1990s. All close to 25 years and older. Sometimes I feel like caving in and buying 2 modern day units. I'm sure this might have crossed your mind? I mainly like the older units due to ruggedness and simple to use. Add fun to that too. I've always felt that if you have a very nice,low hour unit...best to keep it or otherwise look for another and it might not be as nice and for more money. I don't have a gold mine invested in what I have,but sometimes feel pressured into the concept that newer is better. Your thoughts?

Re: Is the interest in vintage metal detectors on the decline?
Posted by: donl98632
Date: December 30, 2017 09:53PM
You may well be right, I have several detectors from the 90's, and have always liked the analog detectors more than the newer digital models. But I recently tried to sell a very nice older Whites model and got no interest at all. The only reason I tried to sell was that at 75 the old analogs are getting a bit heavy to swing.

It would be a shame if they fade away as I believe many are on par with much of the newer models.

avatar
Re: Is the interest in vintage metal detectors on the decline?
Posted by: Old California
Date: December 31, 2017 01:50AM
Good question Straker,

Nothing wrong with using old technology, if that's all a user has that's okay. I too like the older beefier analog detectors, even some of the heavier models. They are fun, and most are simple to use.

Also use top end model's, for serious types of hunting such as relic, deep park turf or tough mineralization both land and water then I go with what works best. It's usually a top end model, Older models don't work as well under these conditions.

Some older models do an okay job, like my GoldScanner Pro for relic hunting but today's top end have an edge on separation and depth.

Depends on the user, And the type of hunting they enjoy. A few can switch back and fourth and enjoy the day using an old dinosaur model, Then switch to a top end when conditions call for deeper faster processing technology.

For me, Newer is better for hunting mineralized soil, hunting old Parks for deep coins, or needing a faster processing detector in areas with thick iron. Otherwise, I'll use an older model for both quick clad and gold jewelry hunting. The older models still do an excellent job finding coins and small gold jewelry from parks and school grounds. They are actually more fun to use, simple too. But for serious hunt's, I'll go with top end because they are better.

Be careful, If you do upgrade. Do your research and get a proven model for your type of hunting, certain models do a better job for certain types of hunting. And some top end model's have a learning curve, a long learning curve be prepared.

Good luck!
HH, Paul



AKA..Paul (Ca)

Whites GoldMaster BFO
Compass Klodike BFO
Bountyhunter BFO
FisherScope TR
Metrotech TR
Detectron TR
Rayscope TR
Mity Mite TR
Garrett BFO
D-Tex BFO
Goldak TR
Relco BFO
Jecto BFO
Teknetics
Roach TR



Edited 4 time(s). Last edit at 12/31/2017 02:17AM by Old California.

Re: Is the interest in vintage metal detectors on the decline?
Posted by: Arthur-Canada
Date: January 01, 2018 02:21AM
I detect all the time with a guy that uses the new Deus. He finds lots of stuff and thinks the machine is the best detector in the world. He swings the thing at a hundred miles an hour and only measures his success by how much stuff he puts in his pocket. I would say 90% of what he finds is within easy discovery by any machine made 25 to 30 years ago. I know because that's what I use and almost never does he have a signal I can't get as well. Difference is I like to get the hard good signals that you miss as you race by with the fancy new detector. To me, one of the hard to get good targets that he missed is worth more to me than the 4 easy ones he gets swinging way ahead of me.

Re: Is the interest in vintage metal detectors on the decline?
Posted by: Tom_in_CA
Date: January 01, 2018 03:53AM
good replies so far. To answer your question as to whether to upgrade or not, we'd need to know what older machines you have.

There are 25 yr. old machines that are still competitive in the modern market. Heck, I think Explorer is approaching 20 yrs. old, isn't it ? And Sov's are a tad older than that, aren't they ? The Tek Mark 1 is now well over 30 yrs. old, and can compete with most all machines out now (assuming soil types not nasty minerals).

Contrast this to the 20 to 25-ish year period, from 1960 to 1985, when if your detector was a mere few years old, you had a dinosaur . Technology advances slowed to a crawl, as we got closer to the ceiling of the laws of physics.



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 01/01/2018 03:54AM by Tom_in_CA.

avatar
Re: Is the interest in vintage metal detectors on the decline?
Posted by: straker
Date: January 01, 2018 10:02AM
Here is what I have. All were top of the line in their day.
Teknetics Mark 1 Limited
Compass XP Pro Plus
Fisher 1265-X
Minelab Sovereign XS
Whites Eagle Spectrum slim line

All are low hour units and look new. Most were purchased for under $200 each last year.

Re: Is the interest in vintage metal detectors on the decline?
Posted by: Tom_in_CA
Date: January 01, 2018 10:18AM
Quote
straker
Here is what I have. All were top of the line in their day.
Teknetics Mark 1 Limited
Compass XP Pro Plus
Fisher 1265-X
Minelab Sovereign XS
Whites Eagle Spectrum slim line ....

The Tek Mark 1 will hold its own against most coin machines of today. Great TID and tones. If it were to be compared to an explorer, (etrac , etc...) then the only thing the explorers would have over it, would be a bit more depth, and a bit better performance in wet salt minerals.

Dunno about the Compass xp pro. Never used one of those.

The Fisher 1265-x is outdated. Wimpy depth compared to today's machines. And if someone liked it working amidst nails (ghost-townsy type sites), there are machines today that out-do it as well. So I'd say this machine is "dated".

The Sovereign XS: Hard to believe this machine is now over 20 yr. old tech. It is still popular today, of course. And is an excellent wet salt beach machine. Some people like it for land hunting too, but I was never too fond of the long drawn out tails in the bbeeeooonnggg for land hunting. Some people got used to it, and actually could used it in junky land sites.

The Whites Eagle Spectrum is a bit dated. I never liked the momentary delay in the sweep to target display time. Like there was a "lag". The earlier Eagle SL II didn't have that. The response time was quicker.

avatar
Re: Is the interest in vintage metal detectors on the decline?
Posted by: straker
Date: January 01, 2018 11:40AM
I agree mostly with what you had to say. Except that the Eagle Spectrum does have a 'Recovery Speed' adjustment of 1-40,with '20' being preset. I chose the Spectrum because it is easier to operate and I don't need a 'cheat sheet' to carry around to help me program it. You have to refer to a guide to help you. Plus you had to pull the trigger and push a certain touch pad at the same time. Also you could forget whether or not if you already programmed it to do a certain function.
I know a fellow treasure hunter who used the earlier Fisher 1200 series and he got very good depth out of them. Fisher metal detectors were hard to beat for depth in the 1980s. I remember an older treasure hunter from my club saying to me "get a fisher,their deeper". He noticed I had a tesoro pantera in my hand at the time. Looking back...he was right!
One thing I noticed though about the analog fishers is that they need to be tuned and calibrated over time. I had to send mine to Keith Wills and now it performs like new.
The Sovereign XS I picked up was for a bargain! I only paid $75 for it shipped. It came with a digital winburn meter and 3 coils. It was only used lightly as the condition is like new. A little dirty from storage,but it cleaned up nicely. All it needed was a replacement AA battery adapter. I had a few sovereigns in the past and found a lot of deep low conductors with them. Mainly shield and V nickels.
It's heavy and I hip mount it. I like it better than a Fisher CZ unit as it doesn't like iron and get fooled into digging rusty nails.
I was very lucky to get my Mk 1 limited for $100 plus $30 for shipping. I suspect the seller inherited this as he didn't even state in the ad that it was a 'Limited'. It was a pole mount and I had Keith Wills take off the fish hook upper rod system,depth modification and install his heavy duty battery clips. Luckily no battery corrosion,but 1 set of clips broke off. I love the tones on the Mk 1. Also the colored block meter is nice to look at. When it squeaks...I listen!



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 01/01/2018 11:56AM by straker.

Re: Is the interest in vintage metal detectors on the decline?
Posted by: Arthur-Canada
Date: January 01, 2018 10:42PM
Quote
Tom_in_CA
Quote
straker
Here is what I have. All were top of the line in their day.
Teknetics Mark 1 Limited
Compass XP Pro Plus
Fisher 1265-X
Minelab Sovereign XS
Whites Eagle Spectrum slim line ....

The Fisher 1265-x is outdated. Wimpy depth compared to today's machines. And if someone liked it working amidst nails (ghost-townsy type sites), there are machines today that out-do it as well. So I'd say this machine is "dated".

I have tried every one of these machines listed. The Fisher 1265-X with enough practice I think can perform as well as most high end machines today...and better than most below that. I have a deep buried 10" coin in my test garden that gives a consistent faint signal that most people would not catch without lots of practice. Even at full disc it gets it!! I have found many a old silver with this signal that I never even registered first couple of years using it. My Cibola can't get it. An AT-Pro I tried could not get it either. My Mark 1 pegs the needle all the way to the good side but makes no sound, but I've seen it do that too on deep large iron. The 1265 is the only machine I trust on a signal like that and it pays large 9 out 10 times.

Re: Is the interest in vintage metal detectors on the decline?
Posted by: Tom_in_CA
Date: January 02, 2018 06:01AM
Straker, some of the things you are saying, are a trip down memory lane ! :beers: But I must address this one quote of yours :

Quote
straker
I agree mostly with what you had to say. Except that the Eagle Spectrum does have a 'Recovery Speed' adjustment of 1-40,with '20' being preset. ..

A) For starters, as you know, there were several in the evolution of incarnations of this spectrum to xlt series, right ? Wherein the box shrunk, changed colors and names, etc.... Yet all on the same similar menus, control names, etc... Right ? And yes, they had the adjustable recovery speed control, just as you say. I used to always set mine at 27 :smoke: But that is not the "lag" or "delay" I am talking about.

You're right, that would speed up the time of the AUDIO . Which is instantaneous with the swipe of the coil over-said-objects. But...

B) The "lag" I'm talking about is the VISUAL. Despite immediate audio, there is a micro-second delay from the time you've swept over the target, to the time the machine flickers the # (or graph or whatever option you've chosen) for your screen.

If you only ever started with the spectrum or XLT, then you might not ever have noticed it. Because it would have been what you grew up with, so-to-speak. But if you had started with the Eagle SL II, THEN you would notice it. The sweep & TID was more instantaneous.

I used the original spectrum and the XLT. This was my observation, from having come from the earlier Eagle SL II days.



Edited 2 time(s). Last edit at 01/02/2018 06:03AM by Tom_in_CA.

Re: Is the interest in vintage metal detectors on the decline?
Posted by: Tom_in_CA
Date: January 02, 2018 06:08AM
Mark & straker : The 1265 was indeed ahead of its time. Versatile, easy to use, pleasant audio, etc.... I don't ever recall getting the depths you guys are attributing to it though (10" on a dime ??) .

I once listed a 1265 for sale on Ebay, and ... the winning bidder was from a country in Europe. I had forgotten to click the box to limit the bidders to only in the USA. I really didn't feel like shipping to Europe, but I was stuck with fulfilling the deal. The buyer pre-paid everything. Including the more expensive overseas shipping. So I had nothing to loose. During the communication to iron it out, he mentioned to me that md'rs in his area (Spain, I think it was) had grown to love that machine. So all the md'rs in his club were strict fans of just that. And since it's out of production, they have no choice but to find them on the used market.

avatar
Re: Is the interest in vintage metal detectors on the decline?
Posted by: john4840
Date: January 02, 2018 09:04PM
In 1986 I started MDing. My father and I shared a used White's 6000 d series 1 we bought for $100. Great machine and we were able find enough clad to buy a used 6000 d series 2, We then started to eyeball the White's 6000 Di Pro at that time the newest top of the line from Whites. My father purchased a new 6000 Di Pro and a couple years later the Eagle II. About the same time this was going on I went off to college and I bought a used Garrett Freedom Ace and a Bounty Hunter Big Bud Pro to bring with me. After college and when I was more financial stable I was able to purchase a new White's XLT. I have to say I put a lot of hours on these machines and found many great things with them, but I was no where near a professional Th'er. About a year later after buying XLT I nervously decided to buy a Minelab Sovereign XS, I was not sure if a machine built in Australia was going to beat a machines built in the USA, but I intrigue by ads with the multi frequencies. I learned how to use Sovereign and I started to find old items in places that slowed down with finds with the other detectors. It was not the depth I liked about my Sovereign XS, but the iron separation. I pulled many silver coins from holes in the ground with rusty nails. The deepest wheat cent I have ever found was a1909 at 12 or 13 inches found with the White's Eagle II. I can remember the meter reading at 12 inches plus and my elbow at the top of the hole. I was so impressed with my Sovereign XS iron separation I gave the XLT to my Father. I received it back when my Father passed away.



Equinox 600
Sovereign XS
Whites XLT

John

Re: Is the interest in vintage metal detectors on the decline?
Posted by: Tom_in_CA
Date: January 03, 2018 09:35AM
great recap. Happy new year to you.

Re: Is the interest in vintage metal detectors on the decline?
Posted by: Joe(TX)
Date: January 05, 2018 04:46AM
Like everyone on this thread I like the vintage detectors over anything new. I have a 1266x that is really deep and found a lot of coins and jewelry tha was missed with other detectors. I am like straker and have not spent more than $200.00 in years. There are bargains out there is if one searches diligently. I have also been using an old Gardiner 202B in really trashy sites and it is finding coins and silver that was mixed in with all of the trash.

Re: Is the interest in vintage metal detectors on the decline?
Posted by: This Dwayne
Date: January 15, 2018 07:20PM
Old California
Hello again. You and i talked about mods for the Mark 1 a good while back. Just wondering if you have done any more of your ideas to the Mark 1 in the last year or so. I would like to add a small led meter on one of my Mark 1 units with just a 2 or 3 unit display. I will never remove the analog meter and the add on would work in parallel with the analog meter, if feasible. Someone published a message a good while back telling where it would connect on the one of the ic chips and i cannot find the info anywhere now. I thought maybe you might know something about it.
Hope this finds you well!

Sorry, only registered users may post in this forum.

Click here to login