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High Gain and Target Size Distortions
Posted by: cjc
Date: May 29, 2018 05:53AM
4/ High Gain and Target Size Distortions
A general characteristic of the CTX's processed signal is that there's something of a “disconnect” between what's under the coil--and the sound you hear. For the gold hunter--this presents a problem. While you are looking for small targets--some even odd shaped, there has to be a “cut-off.” When you run the CTX with the Volume Gain at “30”--there is no such cut off. Tiny bits of aluminum are modulated-up to sound like substantial targets. This is a good example of a CTX-specific jewellery hunting skill set that will prevent a real lot of frustration. While with practice some of these “bitty” sounding signals can be recognised by tone. I recommend reducing the Volume Gain down to “26” or “27” to bring these target sounds down closer to something in keeping with their actual size. (More on this below). It’s worth noting that many UK programs that are aimed at dealing with centuries worth of junk actually take the Volume Gain right down to “20.” Even still, the CTX's high Gain circuitry will amp up some conductors. Many of these will be tiny bits of coiled wire or other objects that have a shape which conducts well. The solution lies in simple basic target examination skills. (More on these later). Another key CTX skill to this end is being able to tell a deep, substantial response from a shallow small one.
There is no substitute for experience in learning these basic skills. While an inland coin hunter can get away with digging all high tones (while identifying obvious iron falses), to be an effective CXT gold jewellery hunter--a greater level of accuracy is required that begins with making accurate size / depth distinctions. Running the Pinpoint setting on “Sizing” helps here as well.
In my opinion to even have a Ratchet pinpointing setting on a high Gain detector like the CTX is counter intuitive--it robs you of critical target ID information. It's also worth noting here that several of the CTX's other features act to amplify small responses and it's necessary to be aware when you are using them. The “High Trash” Target Separation setting also acts to boost small accepted targets. I've run the CTX for quite a few years now and still struggle to not be bogged down by tiny objects which the Gain brings up to sound bigger and louder. One thing I'll repeat from my first CTX book is that it's important to learn to look for “sets” of target characteristics. These act to confirm on another. While the full “In-Keeping” method is detailed in that book--it's worth noting here that this kind of accuracy skill-building is critical for the jewellery hunter in that these low conductor ranges just plain have most of the junk. As well--in that most lost gold is small--sorting through these targets without losing your patience is a critical skill.

Picture Caption
A couple of great edge hunts with the CTX3030. Even with a sophisticated machine like the CTX, to consistently find gold there is the need for a reliance on simple basics.
From: The Minelab CTX 3030 Gold Hunters Guide



Edited 2 time(s). Last edit at 05/29/2018 05:57AM by cjc.




Re: High Gain and Target Size Distortions
Posted by: IDXMonster
Date: May 29, 2018 05:56PM
That’s great reading Clive,and in my relatively short experience,without those “developed and engrained basics” a person may be in effect starting over every time they turn on a machine. It hasn’t mattered much which of the 4 machines I’ve used,the basics still apply. And they really must be experienced by an individual over time to understand them.
Excellent nugget,pun intended.:smile:

Re: High Gain and Target Size Distortions
Posted by: cjc
Date: May 29, 2018 06:26PM
Thanks IDX. As well IMHo there's not such thing as an advanced method that doesen't rely on simple basics. Im really glad that I got interested in pulse machines and had some great mentorship in how to use them. The basics they teach (sizing shaping and placing your signals in context to begin with) are more valueab le now than ever in learing accuracy with these new "sparky" high gain units like the CTX, the EQ, and the Impact for example. Basics are what allow you to manage all that power--and maintain a standard of accuracy. From a lot of the UTube videos Ive seen--a lot of hunters are having to re-learn (or just learn) these basics--or go from one junk target to the next.
cjc

Re: High Gain and Target Size Distortions
Posted by: Ben Town
Date: May 30, 2018 08:09AM
Clive, I have just recently found out how volume gain diferenceates small , and deep objects with that faint signal.
With the original headphones that came with the CTX I found they lacked volume , and noise blocking control so recently I got a good pair of headphones and instead of running VC at 30 I’ve got it down to 25 and now can hear those small deep signals easier when VC is adjusted down .
Was at the beach in Florida the month of April and did find 2 rings , one nice Tungston and one costume and of course clad but those deep faint signals I couldn’t pass up usually were corroded penny’s about 10-14” deep . It was fun and relaxing but can’t bring myself to hunt in the surf , bad hip and knees.
BT

Re: High Gain and Target Size Distortions
Posted by: cjc
Date: June 02, 2018 06:38PM
kind of like when you lower the Sens--there's a better "carry" of deep responses.
cjc

avatar
Re: High Gain and Target Size Distortions
Posted by: Big Boys Hobbies
Date: June 06, 2018 11:45AM
Quote
cjc
4/ High Gain and Target Size Distortions
A general characteristic of the CTX's processed signal is that there's something of a “disconnect” between what's under the coil--and the sound you hear. For the gold hunter--this presents a problem. While you are looking for small targets--some even odd shaped, there has to be a “cut-off.” When you run the CTX with the Volume Gain at “30”--there is no such cut off. Tiny bits of aluminum are modulated-up to sound like substantial targets. This is a good example of a CTX-specific jewellery hunting skill set that will prevent a real lot of frustration. While with practice some of these “bitty” sounding signals can be recognised by tone. I recommend reducing the Volume Gain down to “26” or “27” to bring these target sounds down closer to something in keeping with their actual size. (More on this below). It’s worth noting that many UK programs that are aimed at dealing with centuries worth of junk actually take the Volume Gain right down to “20.” Even still, the CTX's high Gain circuitry will amp up some conductors. Many of these will be tiny bits of coiled wire or other objects that have a shape which conducts well. The solution lies in simple basic target examination skills. (More on these later). Another key CTX skill to this end is being able to tell a deep, substantial response from a shallow small one.
There is no substitute for experience in learning these basic skills. While an inland coin hunter can get away with digging all high tones (while identifying obvious iron falses), to be an effective CXT gold jewellery hunter--a greater level of accuracy is required that begins with making accurate size / depth distinctions. Running the Pinpoint setting on “Sizing” helps here as well.
In my opinion to even have a Ratchet pinpointing setting on a high Gain detector like the CTX is counter intuitive--it robs you of critical target ID information. It's also worth noting here that several of the CTX's other features act to amplify small responses and it's necessary to be aware when you are using them. The “High Trash” Target Separation setting also acts to boost small accepted targets. I've run the CTX for quite a few years now and still struggle to not be bogged down by tiny objects which the Gain brings up to sound bigger and louder. One thing I'll repeat from my first CTX book is that it's important to learn to look for “sets” of target characteristics. These act to confirm on another. While the full “In-Keeping” method is detailed in that book--it's worth noting here that this kind of accuracy skill-building is critical for the jewellery hunter in that these low conductor ranges just plain have most of the junk. As well--in that most lost gold is small--sorting through these targets without losing your patience is a critical skill.

Picture Caption
A couple of great edge hunts with the CTX3030. Even with a sophisticated machine like the CTX, to consistently find gold there is the need for a reliance on simple basics.
From: The Minelab CTX 3030 Gold Hunters Guide

Good info here! Much appreciated!



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