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Question for Micheal or anyone else who may know.......

Dan-MO

Well-known member
I just read where the state of Mo. is planning for it's first limited black bear season in modern times as well as a limited elk season. More and more black bear are being reported dumpster diving and causing general panic in small towns across south and south central Mo. I have seen 3 wild bears in my life all in the woods and none of them seemed like much of a threat......all 3 seemed terrified of me and ran away quickly, but when one visits a town folks seem to go into panic mode. While I have been a life-long hunter, I really don't have any desire to shoot a bear. My question is, how dangerous is a wild black bear? How about around children, pets, and livestock? If one was to hunt black bear, how much gun would you feel comfortable with to get the job done. Thanks
 

Guvner

Administrator
Staff member
I'm with you Dan... But if it's a gal pal bear with her cubs all bets are off. She might was well be a grissly. Don't much like to hunt unless I'm eating it.

All the best...

G...
 

Missouri--Ma Betty

Well-known member
I just read where the state of Mo. is planning for it's first limited black bear season in modern times as well as a limited elk season. More and more black bear are being reported dumpster diving and causing general panic in small towns across south and south central Mo. I have seen 3 wild bears in my life all in the woods and none of them seemed like much of a threat......all 3 seemed terrified of me and ran away quickly, but when one visits a town folks seem to go into panic mode. While I have been a life-long hunter, I really don't have any desire to shoot a bear. My question is, how dangerous is a wild black bear? How about around children, pets, and livestock? If one was to hunt black bear, how much gun would you feel comfortable with to get the job done. Thanks

I, too, live in MO but in Yellowstone Park & etc. they forage for food & are only dangerous it seems when they feel threatened; so probably the same here or other states but there are rogues who've had the taste of human blood & truly are dangerous to any human who comes into contact with them!

My mom saw a black bear cross our farm & go into the woods--she yelled so loudly that it scared the twins & Carolyn cried --not knowing what was happening & this was probably about the early 1950s for the twins were born in 1946!

As far as hunting them & what gun to use, I don't know--never hunted nor shot anything! Also, GOV has been releasing wild animals into MO for many years--I am mostly afraid of Rattlesnakes that MO has plenty of--I cannot stand snakes whether animals or human kind & I know some are harmless & are helpful by killing Poisonous ones--same as Human-beings --There are those GOOD & godly & others are BAD & ungodly --who're murderers of the innocent! God Bless! Ma
 

Steve(Can)

Well-known member
Dan, we were always told that a black bear will run away from you faster than you can run from it, just don't get between a mama and her cubs... but that is not always the case. In my area in recent years, black bear have been known to stalk people, a few years ago, one killed a man and his wife while camping and cached their bodies... in the same area, one killed two boys who were fishing. This is a very rare occurrence with black bears and unheard of until recent years.

Black bears can be a nuisance in the trash or tearing into a cabin or a tent while camping. They are at their worse in heavily visited parks where tourists camp and canoe. They have gotten clever and recognize coolers and have learned to open cars to get at them. They have also learned how to open canoe food barrels show to get them even when they are hanging from a tree limb. In the wild, banging on pots and throwing rocks and sticks will usually send them scurrying, however when these badly behaved bears who have learned to associate people with food come visiting, there is no stopping them.

Black bears are known for their false charges... they will lay their ears back and woof, woof, woof, like a dog as they run towards you and turning back and retreating at the last minute.... in the wild, standing your ground and making noise is the way to face a false charge. Putting the rocks to it will usually send it slinking away eventually.... for badly behaved bears who have learned they can make people run and then destroy the camp and eat their food, there is no way to persuade them otherwise... other than shooting them, which is a real shame, but there is not much else that can be done with a nuisance bear. When I worked at the Ontario Natural Resources, we used to live trap problem bears in barrel traps built on trailers and truck them away from the public to remote areas, but it was found they would return to their home range and be a nuisance all along the way home.

Any old hunting rifle will drop a bear... .303's, 30-30's and up. I've shot bears with an old Winchester 38-55 and with a Ruger 44 carbine. Make the first shot count... when they take off scrambling, they move!...dodging and diving in every direction, summersaulting and rolling down hills,... you can empty a gun and it would be sheer luck to touch a hair.
 

Micheal_R

Moderator
Staff member
A good question for us here, Dan..First, let me make it clear that I have no desire to shoot, much less eat a bear..I have tried bear.. even the ones that

pillage my apple trees are too gamey for my liking [my nephew comes and takes one every year.. he thinks they are delicious].. Now that said.. I will shoot one if it becomes too familiar

with my livestock and/or trees..People talk about blackies as if they are/were safe... By grizz standards, I guess they are..

However, and this is the big one.. people know grizz; they are alert and aware when one comes around.. Blackies are much more unpredictable.. they can choose to ignore you; or

they can go the other way and chase, or as Steve said, even go to the point of stalking you. This is when, when I go out huckleberry picking, I always carry the 12 gauge.. With double aught and then a slug.

I am getting too old to try to outrun a bear.. :LOL: I find people from the city [Vancouver in my province, Toronto in Steves, Montreal etc] have really no idea about wildlife.. bears, cougars, etc.. In truth, I actually

fear cougars much more than bears.. they are sneaky.. and will definitely come from behind.

As Steve pointed out.. NEVER get between a mom bear and her babes..

Now that said.. I have a buddy who was cooking breakfast last year.. his dog insisted upon scratching at the door and he kept telling the dog to 'Cut it out".. He looked out the window,

grabbed the 30-30 . opened the door and shot the blackie; which promptly fell into his kitchen. I had to take the skidsteer and putt it out for the kitchen for him.. Again;l unpredictable.

But as to elk.. How does this look.. Taken outside my window in my fields this last Feb..

20180307_080337.jpg


Calm seas

Micheal..
 
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My question is, how dangerous is a wild black bear?
I have hunted my whole life. You have higher odds of getting attacked by a whitetail deer than Black Bear. No issues with kids, pets or livestock either.


If one was to hunt black bear, how much gun would you feel comfortable with to get the job done. Thanks
I have harvested about a dozen bear. If I could get a permit every year, there would be no more venison in the house. NOTHING like bear ribs on the grill. In fact, had grilled bear steaks last night. I tree stand hunt about 70 yards away from a bait station with a .243 Bear are no more difficult to take down than a deer.

Dave
 

Steve O

Well-known member
I have eaten bear years ago, it was cooked to death. I understand it's a must if you want to avoid trichinosis, is this still true?
It tasted like slightly gamy roast beef, memory serves me.
I had elk steaks also, they were delicious .... . . ..no fat and had a faint liver taste.
My brother in law makes venison jerky and gives me a sandwich bag full of it every year . . .. I can't stop eating it till it's gone, it's so stinking good.
I haven't hunted for fifty years. I enjoyed small game, walking through fields and woods. We would cook it and eat what we shot over a campfire before getting home. BB-Q sauce always in the truck. Fun times.
 

Greg(E.Tn)

Well-known member
There have been fatal black bear attacks in Tennessee, though they are not frequent occurances:

May 21, 2000 A "" Ms. Bradley was attacked in the Elkmont section of the park while hiking and waiting for her former husband, Ralph Hill, who was fishing nearby. Ms. Bradley, an experienced hiker, was attacked about 2 miles from the trailhead on the Little River Trail at, or near, the intersection of the Goshen Prong Trail, an area she was familiar with. The pair had entered the park about 12:00. At about 2:00 Mr. Hill had fished his way out of sight. When he returned about an hour later he found her pack undisturbed then located her body off the trail and two bears guarding the motionless body. Mr. Hill and other hikers were unsuccessful in their attempts to drive the bears away from the body."

April 13, 2006: " Susan Cenkus, 45, and two of her children, Luke, 2 and Elora Petrasek, 6, were attacked by a black bear while visiting the Cherokee National Forest southeast Tennessee. Six year old Elora was killed during the attack and both Susan and Luke were seriously injured. Susan took the two youngest children to Benton Falls, a popular destination in the Cherokee National Forest, not far from Cleveland. As they were leaving the area around the waterfalls a bear was sighted near the trail. As adults tried to scare the bear away it ran in and grabbed two year old Luke Cenkus by the head. Susan used rocks and sticks to try to get the bear to let go of Luke. When the bear dropped Luke, it attacked Susan, dragging her into the forest. "

" Other people hiking in the area joined in and drove the bear away from Susan. However, sometime during the panic of the attack, 6 year old Elora apparently ran off into the woods or down the trail.

When they realized Elora was missing a frantic search of the area was immediately started. By the time Danny Stinnett was able to find her, the black bear was standing over her lifeless body she was approximately 80 yards away. "

Tennessee has a pretty healthy bear population, hence a yearly bear season. In 2018, 759 bears were harvested, setting a record. I've never eaten bear meat. They are a nuisance, sometimes a dangerous nuisance, in resort areas like Gatlinburg, Pigeon Forge, and Townsend, Tennessee. They are dangerous, and we need to take action to maintain their fear of humans.

I just read where the state of Mo. is planning for it's first limited black bear season in modern times as well as a limited elk season. More and more black bear are being reported dumpster diving and causing general panic in small towns across south and south central Mo. I have seen 3 wild bears in my life all in the woods and none of them seemed like much of a threat......all 3 seemed terrified of me and ran away quickly, but when one visits a town folks seem to go into panic mode. While I have been a life-long hunter, I really don't have any desire to shoot a bear. My question is, how dangerous is a wild black bear? How about around children, pets, and livestock? If one was to hunt black bear, how much gun would you feel comfortable with to get the job done. Thanks
 

Confetrit

Well-known member
I just read where the state of Mo. is planning for it's first limited black bear season in modern times as well as a limited elk season. More and more black bear are being reported dumpster diving and causing general panic in small towns across south and south central Mo. I have seen 3 wild bears in my life all in the woods and none of them seemed like much of a threat......all 3 seemed terrified of me and ran away quickly, but when one visits a town folks seem to go into panic mode. While I have been a life-long hunter, I really don't have any desire to shoot a bear. My question is, how dangerous is a wild black bear? How about around children, pets, and livestock? If one was to hunt black bear, how much gun would you feel comfortable with to get the job done. Thanks
I don't believe that in general black bears pose a great threat to humans unless you run up on one in the woods with little ones (cubs), then their motherly instincts kicks in. They are very protective of their young. Black bears are still wildlife and should be viewed as such. The biggest threat to the black bear is humans not having common sense and trying to hand feed them and treat them as if they are a foo foo lap dog. They are huge, they are powerful, and they can do some harm if they take a notion to. They need to be treated with respect. JMHO
 

hawgdawg

Well-known member
Years ago ,, I had a great uncle that had a small farm ,, it backed up to some swampland , and one of those backwoods blackwater rivers that runs thru the eastern coast of NC . My Uncle kept a few hogs , mainly for his own personal use . I started and learned a lot about hunting , scouting and stalking thru those swamps back when I was around 10-11 years old . One morning my great uncle went out to slop the hogs into the woods where he kept the hog pen ,,,he had a sow that was around 500 + pounds or so ,, he found here laid up against a tree with her belly ripped out and chewed up . Bear tracks all around . Me and another Uncle , sat out in the hog pen all that night with a 357 ,, a 30-06 , and a fifth of Jim Beam waiting on that bear to return . He never did . They can be aggressive when cornered , or hungry , but they mostly like to stay away from people for the most part , or that has been my expierence anyway . My brother did see a mama bear with 2 cubs out in a field across from his house one day ,, maybe 100 yrds away ,, he and his son walked to the edge of the field so his son could see them ,, the mama bear saw them and stood up on her back legs , he took that as his sign to vacate the AO .
Here's another thing to remember if you're going to hunt bears ,, back in the mid 80s , I was stationed on Camp Lejuene in NC ,, there was areas of the base that you could get a permit to hunt on base . I did not know the guy , I just read this story in a Base newspaper at that time . 2 Marines went hunting on base back then , out in the woods , they split up and spread out a little . One of the guys said everything was quiet , and nothing was moving much ,, he had just been leaning up against a tree looking around ,, for no real reason ,,, he decided to look around the tree behind him ,,, when he did , there was a bear standing on 2 legs about 5-6 feet away from him. He ended up shooting the bear at point blank range . The article said that bear was about 600 pounds . So keep that in mind if you go bear hunting ,, they are some sneaky critters . Be careful , and good luck if you go after them .
 

Steve O

Well-known member
My mother in law is a bit on the ditzy side plus a little ignant. She use to live up near Shickshinny, Pa. She is really a city girl raised in Phila way back.
One morning she went outside her house and chased/scared 2 cubs up a tree with the mama bear nearby at her bird feeder. ....with a broom . . :oops:
I told her not to do that anymore, she laughed.
 
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Confetrit

Well-known member
My mother in law is a bit on the ditzy side plus a little ignant. She use to live up near Shickshinny, Pa. She is really a city girl raised in Phila way back.
One morning she went outside her house and chased/scared 2 cubs up a tree with the mama bear nearby at her bird feeder. ....with a broom . . :oops:
I told her not to do that anymore, she laughed.
Your aunt was lucky......and I'm glad she was.
 

u2robert

Active member
Bear meat is about the most greasiest fat laden meat I ever ate.
Just looking at the meat you can see the veins of fat running through the meat.
I do believe it's because that's what they live on during hibernation.
Just not for me.
 

Greg(E.Tn)

Well-known member
What's interesting is, early explorers like James Adair spoke far more about the qualities of bear "oil" than bear meat.
Bear meat is about the most greasiest fat laden meat I ever ate.
Just looking at the meat you can see the veins of fat running through the meat.
I do believe it's because that's what they live on during hibernation.
Just not for me.
 
There have been fatal black bear attacks in Tennessee, though they are not frequent occurances:

May 21, 2000 A "" Ms. Bradley was attacked in the Elkmont section of the park while hiking and waiting for her former husband, Ralph Hill, who was fishing nearby. Ms. Bradley, an experienced hiker, was attacked about 2 miles from the trailhead on the Little River Trail at, or near, the intersection of the Goshen Prong Trail, an area she was familiar with. The pair had entered the park about 12:00. At about 2:00 Mr. Hill had fished his way out of sight. When he returned about an hour later he found her pack undisturbed then located her body off the trail and two bears guarding the motionless body. Mr. Hill and other hikers were unsuccessful in their attempts to drive the bears away from the body."

April 13, 2006: " Susan Cenkus, 45, and two of her children, Luke, 2 and Elora Petrasek, 6, were attacked by a black bear while visiting the Cherokee National Forest southeast Tennessee. Six year old Elora was killed during the attack and both Susan and Luke were seriously injured. Susan took the two youngest children to Benton Falls, a popular destination in the Cherokee National Forest, not far from Cleveland. As they were leaving the area around the waterfalls a bear was sighted near the trail. As adults tried to scare the bear away it ran in and grabbed two year old Luke Cenkus by the head. Susan used rocks and sticks to try to get the bear to let go of Luke. When the bear dropped Luke, it attacked Susan, dragging her into the forest. "

" Other people hiking in the area joined in and drove the bear away from Susan. However, sometime during the panic of the attack, 6 year old Elora apparently ran off into the woods or down the trail.

When they realized Elora was missing a frantic search of the area was immediately started. By the time Danny Stinnett was able to find her, the black bear was standing over her lifeless body she was approximately 80 yards away. "

Tennessee has a pretty healthy bear population, hence a yearly bear season. In 2018, 759 bears were harvested, setting a record. I've never eaten bear meat. They are a nuisance, sometimes a dangerous nuisance, in resort areas like Gatlinburg, Pigeon Forge, and Townsend, Tennessee. They are dangerous, and we need to take action to maintain their fear of humans.
Sick.
 

Micheal_R

Moderator
Staff member
And yet you follow the line made by another poster here who gleefully reports with enthusiasm the numbers of Covid fatalities.

Go figure

Micheal
 
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