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1922 Peace Dollar. What is high relief mean in plain English?

Ronstar

Well-known member
Dug my first silver dollar today! Looking at the Redbook it mentions both high relief and normal relief (I assume the engraving). Sounds like a few were minted in 1921 but not practical so melted down those. Satin and Matte finish 1922s out there but does anyone know how to tell those from regular finish? Mine looks shiny on the back but heat exposed on the front so I’m not up on the minor differences to spot straight on.
 

BigTony

Well-known member
Ron, if it has a high relief than there are higher areas of the coin that will wear out first.
An example is the Standing Liberty quarter. The date was higher than the coins surface, so that wore off first from usage.
Most of those we find detecting don’t have a date on them because of that issue.
Congratulations on finding a silver dollar, very cool Find.
Tony
 

Ronstar

Well-known member
Usually the coin book has an example, none this time. Untrained eye here so not knowing or understanding what I’m looking for. I assume the difference is miniscule?
 

BigTony

Well-known member
Ron, Satin and Matte are also used in house paint.
Satin is shiny but matte is a flat.
Your coin would be hard to tell which one due to the fact it was in the dirt for so long but that’s just my opinion.

When the coin was new you could tell the difference right away - Satin would be extremely shiny and matte would be bright but toned down
So no, when new there is a huge difference.
Tony
 

Ronstar

Well-known member
I can follow that logic!! Front side I thought was maybe exposed to heat but jkline thinking more just tarnished or had been up against something. Back side is very shiny compared to two other dollars I have (not found, family hand downs) so maybe……..?
 

Elmy

Well-known member
I can follow that logic!! Front side I thought was maybe exposed to heat but jkline thinking more just tarnished or had been up against something. Back side is very shiny compared to two other dollars I have (not found, family hand downs) so maybe……..?
secret sauce for a half hour.
 

Ronstar

Well-known member
Elmy, a philosophical question…..
I use the secret sauce often. If this coin ends up being a high relief specimen would any cleaning of the coin potentially hurt any value going forward in your opinion?
The coin shop in Spokane, WA (respected shop) looked at my pristine 1907 IH and unofficially told me it would grade EF40 and above. My dilemma is how to properly get the green patina off to insure its value, a little screw up could cost me its potential high rating. With the Peace Dollar a little screw up could cost me a good chunk of value. Not saying the secret sauce would do that but an ounce of prevention…….My other option would be to take it to the coin shop and see if he could identify it visually as high or normal.
 

Elmy

Well-known member
Elmy, a philosophical question…..
I use the secret sauce often. If this coin ends up being a high relief specimen would any cleaning of the coin potentially hurt any value going forward in your opinion?
The coin shop in Spokane, WA (respected shop) looked at my pristine 1907 IH and unofficially told me it would grade EF40 and above. My dilemma is how to properly get the green patina off to insure its value, a little screw up could cost me its potential high rating. With the Peace Dollar a little screw up could cost me a good chunk of value. Not saying the secret sauce would do that but an ounce of prevention…….My other option would be to take it to the coin shop and see if he could identify it visually as high or normal.
absolutely check it out ....never clean a valuable coin yourself.... usually a dug coin has been de-graded and all coin dealers will know it at first glance.
Hard to get what a coin is valued at in the books with a dug coin.
 

jim tn

Well-known member
absolutely check it out ....never clean a valuable coin yourself.... usually a dug coin has been de-graded and all coin dealers will know it at first glance.
Hard to get what a coin is valued at in the books with a dug coin.
That's been my experience on dug coins, too. I've had a few instances over the years where a silver coin has gotten by a dealers "smell test," so to speak, and not degraded as being dug, but that's a rare occasion. Cents and nickels are near impossible, it seems. HH jim tn
 
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