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Another brass/bronze decorative piece(s) from near the War of 1812 tavern site - found this yesterday

Steve(Can)

Well-known member
... ha, appears this one fits too.

1812_3.jpg
 
Whoah, that is just amazing, Steve, you nailed it! You should get some kind of a prize for that! Thanks so much for finding those.

That girandole is definitely an exact match for those other two pieces - the 2nd piece that I thought was a finial with the bolt hole in it is located right smack in the middle between the two acanthus leaf scrolls on either side. They might even still fit up to one another, I will have to check. Also take a look at the very last one, Picture 16, “Two Girls, and Deer”, 3-arm, New York or Philadelphia" on page 11, which has the same central core pieces (that I found) as the one that you posted above. Amazing!

You've given me some important insights on this site. I now think that we can eliminate these four girandole fragments came from the long-gone War of 1812 tavern site a few hundred yards to the south of the sandstone foundation house (still standing), because they don't match the time period of the late 1790s-early 1800s probably log construction tavern, so rather all 4 of them must be from the sandstone foundation farm house. In later years (1870s-1880s) it's labeled on the map as a doctor's house, and in 1851 it may or may not (due to some mapping inaccuracy by the cartographer/surveyors) be a nearby tavern that possibly replaced the much older one after it disappeared, although a few hundred yards to the north. Whatever the case, they were able to afford some really amazing fancy gilded girandoles! :ROFLMAO::ROFLMAO::ROFLMAO::ROFLMAO:
 
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I think we posted about the same time there - yes, it (the piece with the bolt hole in it that I was calling a finial) sure does match! Same construction as the "Two Girls and Deer" one on page 11... modular construction.

I'm definitely gonna have to detect more, and/or dig deeper! If I find enough pieces, I can rebuild them :ROFLMAO:
 
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Steve(Can)

Well-known member
Odd, the two pieces from each of the two sets fit right together: the indian head and cloak; the leaves and center piece. Did you find them pretty close together ...in the same holes?

Yeah they are, some pretty amazing fancy guilded pieces of art, and two different sets no less. Doctor's house makes sense.. a wedding gift maybe. Wonder how things so expensive and beautiful ended up broken in the ground? Any record of a fire in the original building?

Pretty cool, FH. The two girls and the deer would be a nice piece to find! :thumbup:
 
Odd, the two pieces from each of the two sets fit right together: the indian head and cloak; the leaves and center piece. Did you find them pretty close together ...in the same holes?

Yeah they are, some pretty amazing fancy guilded pieces of art, and two different sets no less. Doctor's house makes sense.. a wedding gift maybe. Wonder how things so expensive and beautiful ended up broken in the ground? Any record of a fire in the original building?

Pretty cool, FH. The two girls and the deer would be a nice piece to find! :thumbup:
The indian head and cloak were really close to each other (less than 2 or 3 feet apart, shallow) and were located nearest to the still-inhabited house with a sandstone foundation, which was a doctor's house. I just found them on Monday.

The acanthus leaves and center piece that I first thought was a finial were also found close together (less than 3 feet apart, but they both were pretty deep) maybe about 2 years ago, but but they were much closer to where I found all of the late 1700's/early 1800s stuff at a brook or ditch really close to what I believe was the exact site of the long-gone War of 1812 tavern which is mentioned anecdotally in some online records but does not show up at all on any maps. I checked with the ruler tool on Google Earth and the acanthus leaves/center piece were located about 560 feet to the south of where I found the indian head and cloak. I don't think they could have been from the original circa 1800 tavern, but I could be wrong -- maybe that (presumably log) tavern survived until the late 1840s when the fancy gilded pieces were bought, but then that original tavern either rotted away or was torn down or burned down prior to the 1851 map, which is the earliest map I can find. Haven't seen any blatant signs of blackened soil or evidence of a log cabin fire in my holes I've dug there, and virtually no records at all of the old building rather than the short reference online that a certain person operated a tavern during the War of 1812.

Likewise, I wonder why 2 items so expensive and beautiful ended up broken in the ground, and separated by ~200 yards. The ones near the sandstone house make sense, but the ones way to the south wouldn't have been deposited side-by-side by a plow or harrow rake, I would think. Possibly kids were playing with the fragments down by the brook? I don't know the melting temperature of brass/bronze but I don't see any evidence of any degree of melting to them. Doctor's house or wedding gift does make sense (or a nice tavern/hotel), but I can't fathom why 2 separate high-end lighting pieces would have been discarded like that. I will definitely keep looking for more fragments - nice high "dig me" signal on all of these, of course, so it will be hard to miss them unless they're super deep.
 
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