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First Hunt with the new 8.5" DD search coil

Sven

Well-known member
Simplex Hunt with the NEW 8.5” Searchcoil


Part 1
By Sven Stau
July 12, 2020
Now I have read all about people having complaints the Simplex is to chattery and just noisy to use. So Nokta/Makro came out with Update 2.78 for those that don’t want a hot rod of a detector. My Simplex has not been updated to 2.78, didn’t feel the need to. Loaded on my Simplex is 2.77.

After a number of hours bench testing targets of various sorts from coins to gold and silver rings indoors. There was really no EMI issues living in this high rise. Maybe just a bit of noise at 7 bars, max. sensitivity. Much more quiet at 6 bars and silent or almost at 5 bars. This gave some indication how the detector would react in the wild.

Both new 8.5” round DD and the 9.5 x 5” coils were bench tested for air depth, reaction time, target ID, masking. First off, both coils are of the usaul high quality found supplied with Nokta/Makros other upper end detectors. They did not cheapen out, just because the Simplex is supposed to be an entry level detector. Both coils were impressive on the bench. Both coils would will really enhance a detectorists detecting ability to handle much more situations, hunting styles and types of hunting.

Both coils have no issues locating the usual good targets most are after. Target ID’s are more accurate, junk targets do bounce or have somewhat consistent ID numbers. Modes seem a bit better defined. Pinpointing is much easier, center of the 8.5” coil if using the pinpoint button or edge of the coils tip if using the pull back method.

Canadians will be interested on how it fares with the Canadian nickel plated steel clad coins.

There have been a number of different compositions of these clad coins over the years. Current clad coins are really junk. While the older composition coins can be difficult to ID due to some number bounce or whether they are lying flat or on edge. The older coins are not to difficult to find once you master their signature tones and ID number. They will mostly fall in the 60-72 number range. There will be exceptions. As for current composition coins. You will have to get your head around most detectors see them as rash targets. They will ID in the lower numbers such as 10-14 number range, if they are on edge, they drop ID numbers into the iron range 04-06 on average. That’s like nail range, so if you get a tight narrow target, or clipped audio sound that is not the usual nail double blip sound. Then you may as well check it out. Some of the older coins lying on edge will also ID in the 04-06 range.

Some want to know how depth will compare between the round and oval coils. Because they are DD, the round coils will get better depth. But, the oval coil have an edge hunting in very very trashy areas, where depth is not a factor. And will be better getting into tight spaces, such as corn stubble for farm field hunters. Air testing has shown the 8.5” coil gets close to the stock 11” coil air depth.

Saw others were asking about the coils weight. Some may find them a bit heavy, they are not super lightweight like those found on other detectors. As I recall they have to be heavier, the main reason is that the Simplex is both a land and water hunting detector. The coil has to be heavier so it will not try to raise to the surface. Like a beach ball when pushed under water, which takes a lot of human pressure to keep it down. If hunting in salt water, if the coils are not neutrally buoyant they will float unlike hunting in freshwater. So the Simplex being a dual purpose detector is probably not much different than other similar detectors. If the Simplex was strictly a land detector, super light weight coils could be made. And the Simplex would feel much lighter in weight more like the Quest detectors.

Today, went out to field test the 8.5” round DD coil. To a schoolyard hunted in the past, wasn’t too concerned if I didn’t find much or anything old. It was just to see how the coil handled the soil and performed among all the trash………………locating Canadian coins.

The Simplex was turned on and ground balanced. Notched out only the first bar, which I really didn’t have to do. First thing that was noticed, at 7 bars, max. sensitivity it ran stable and quiet. Didn’t matter which mode I was in. At 6 bars the Simplex was almost dead quiet. At 5 bars, basically a silent hunting detector. Except for All Metal’s mode threshold which is always there. Encountered no EMI, except from my pinpointer. Too lazy to switch frequencies, so the search coil was just moved out of the way. The only time you hear some slight chatter is when you lay the detector down to dig a target.

Most coin targets today were in the 5-7” range. They were not a problem for the Simplex to pick-up. As always there were some deeper targets, that were too deep to dig for. Performance was typical for a DD coil in the 8.5” range. Makes for a really good all purpose search coil that many favor. A breath of fresh air, it feels like when using the Simplex. Very pleased with this coil.

As for my finds, about $11.00 in Canadian clad, $1 and $2 coins, quarters, one nickel and a bunch of pennies, no dimes. And the usual trash.

Will point out, all modes were used, the mode I liked best for hunting Canadian clad was Park 2. Bench testing originally thought I would have preferred Park 1, the tones sounded a bit cleaner and crispier.

Next outing, will be checking out the 9.5 x 5” coil. Stay tuned.
 

Attachments

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pine3874

Active member
Thanks for the review Sven. Is the 8.5 round coil lighter than the stock 11" coil, about the same or heavier? Thanks
 

Monte

Well-known member
Sven,

I appreciate the review. Can't wit to give both coils an evaluation here in the USA on our better-quality / non-magnetic metal coins. Just wish we had a lot more of the $1 and anything that resembled a $2 coin to go find. The dollar coins are used very little because we still have paper currency. I wish it was yanked from production and use.

Monte
 

tvr

Well-known member
Sven,

I appreciate the review. Can't wit to give both coils an evaluation here in the USA on our better-quality / non-magnetic metal coins. Just wish we had a lot more of the $1 and anything that resembled a $2 coin to go find. The dollar coins are used very little because we still have paper currency. I wish it was yanked from production and use.

Monte
Agreed. The coins have a much longer life and over all are much less costly for tax payers than the small denomination paper bills. Periodically I send my senators and representative a reminder on how it is the smart thing to do to get rid of $1 and $5 bills and make coins instead. And get rid of the darned zincolns too, round to the nearest nickle for change.
 

Sven

Well-known member
Thanks for the review Sven. Is the 8.5 round coil lighter than the stock 11" coil, about the same or heavier? Thanks
Just weighed the stock 11" coil and the 8.5, using my scale they weigh the same.. The 9.5 x 5 comes in about 2 ounces less.
 

pine3874

Active member
Thanks Sven! If you do water hunting could you please test the coils underwater to determine which one produces the least amount of resistance. I find the 11" produces very little drag underwater especially for a coil that size. If the 8.5 has even less drag that would be great and a reason to give it a try.
 

Just coils

Active member
Thanks for all the reports and weight of new coils. I still need personally, a smaller lighter coil. Will keep my eyes on the feedback from all the users and may pick up the 9.5 x 5" in a few months.
Thanks again.
 

Dave_E

Troll
Companies should make ALL coils as light, and hydrodynamic, as possible.

On the elbow end of the detector, there could be a sliding weight used to adjust balance of the machine for personal preference.

They could sell coil covers perfectly weighted for water hunters to eliminate buoyancy while keeping land hunters happy too.

You heard it here first folks.
 

amcoins44

Member
Someone good at fabrication should be able to come up with a counterweight mechanism for this machine. There's a nice pocket under the arm cuff that could be used somehow. I remember a guy used to make a useful counterweight for the Garrett AT series that worked well.
 

Sven

Well-known member
I already made one, about 6 years ago for a Fisher F5. Took about a 5" section of alumin. tubing salvaged from another detector handle, filled it with lead.
On the Simplex opened up a hole under the arm cuff where the middle tube slides up into. Slide the lead filled tube into the now opening. The Simplex balances just about perfect, when
I adjust the length of the coil to the height I like best where the coil is about 5-6" in front of my toes. The lead does add weight, to me the Simplex with the weight feels like I am swinging an Anfibio with the 7" coil.
The lead filled tubing is a snug fit. It also can be adjusted for personal tastes by sliding it in further or having some hang outside the back of the armcuff.
 

amcoins44

Member
I already made one, about 6 years ago for a Fisher F5. Took about a 5" section of alumin. tubing salvaged from another detector handle, filled it with lead.
On the Simplex opened up a hole under the arm cuff where the middle tube slides up into. Slide the lead filled tube into the now opening. The Simplex balances just about perfect, when
I adjust the length of the coil to the height I like best where the coil is about 5-6" in front of my toes. The lead does add weight, to me the Simplex with the weight feels like I am swinging an Anfibio with the 7" coil.
The lead filled tubing is a snug fit. It also can be adjusted for personal tastes by sliding it in further or having some hang outside the back of the armcuff.
Do you think you might be able to post a few pictures to help? I'd like to see a device that mounts into the small open section under the cuff, and has some sort of telescoping or extending portion that is weighted. Extending that section would counterbalance the machine specific to the operator's needs and comfort.
 

Dave_E

Troll
Could also find an old, heavy duty slide rule, a piece of round stock, and some duct tape and begin playing around.
 

amcoins44

Member
Could also find an old, heavy duty slide rule, a piece of round stock, and some duct tape and begin playing around.
I had a math teacher in high school that insisted we learn the slide rule despite that calculators had been the norm for at least a few years. I wonder if I still have mine somewhere.
 

fematrailer

Active member
Simplex Hunt with the NEW 8.5” Searchcoil


Part 1
By Sven Stau
July 12, 2020
Now I have read all about people having complaints the Simplex is to chattery and just noisy to use. So Nokta/Makro came out with Update 2.78 for those that don’t want a hot rod of a detector. My Simplex has not been updated to 2.78, didn’t feel the need to. Loaded on my Simplex is 2.77.

After a number of hours bench testing targets of various sorts from coins to gold and silver rings indoors. There was really no EMI issues living in this high rise. Maybe just a bit of noise at 7 bars, max. sensitivity. Much more quiet at 6 bars and silent or almost at 5 bars. This gave some indication how the detector would react in the wild.

Both new 8.5” round DD and the 9.5 x 5” coils were bench tested for air depth, reaction time, target ID, masking. First off, both coils are of the usaul high quality found supplied with Nokta/Makros other upper end detectors. They did not cheapen out, just because the Simplex is supposed to be an entry level detector. Both coils were impressive on the bench. Both coils would will really enhance a detectorists detecting ability to handle much more situations, hunting styles and types of hunting.

Both coils have no issues locating the usual good targets most are after. Target ID’s are more accurate, junk targets do bounce or have somewhat consistent ID numbers. Modes seem a bit better defined. Pinpointing is much easier, center of the 8.5” coil if using the pinpoint button or edge of the coils tip if using the pull back method.

Canadians will be interested on how it fares with the Canadian nickel plated steel clad coins.

There have been a number of different compositions of these clad coins over the years. Current clad coins are really junk. While the older composition coins can be difficult to ID due to some number bounce or whether they are lying flat or on edge. The older coins are not to difficult to find once you master their signature tones and ID number. They will mostly fall in the 60-72 number range. There will be exceptions. As for current composition coins. You will have to get your head around most detectors see them as rash targets. They will ID in the lower numbers such as 10-14 number range, if they are on edge, they drop ID numbers into the iron range 04-06 on average. That’s like nail range, so if you get a tight narrow target, or clipped audio sound that is not the usual nail double blip sound. Then you may as well check it out. Some of the older coins lying on edge will also ID in the 04-06 range.

Some want to know how depth will compare between the round and oval coils. Because they are DD, the round coils will get better depth. But, the oval coil have an edge hunting in very very trashy areas, where depth is not a factor. And will be better getting into tight spaces, such as corn stubble for farm field hunters. Air testing has shown the 8.5” coil gets close to the stock 11” coil air depth.

Saw others were asking about the coils weight. Some may find them a bit heavy, they are not super lightweight like those found on other detectors. As I recall they have to be heavier, the main reason is that the Simplex is both a land and water hunting detector. The coil has to be heavier so it will not try to raise to the surface. Like a beach ball when pushed under water, which takes a lot of human pressure to keep it down. If hunting in salt water, if the coils are not neutrally buoyant they will float unlike hunting in freshwater. So the Simplex being a dual purpose detector is probably not much different than other similar detectors. If the Simplex was strictly a land detector, super light weight coils could be made. And the Simplex would feel much lighter in weight more like the Quest detectors.

Today, went out to field test the 8.5” round DD coil. To a schoolyard hunted in the past, wasn’t too concerned if I didn’t find much or anything old. It was just to see how the coil handled the soil and performed among all the trash………………locating Canadian coins.

The Simplex was turned on and ground balanced. Notched out only the first bar, which I really didn’t have to do. First thing that was noticed, at 7 bars, max. sensitivity it ran stable and quiet. Didn’t matter which mode I was in. At 6 bars the Simplex was almost dead quiet. At 5 bars, basically a silent hunting detector. Except for All Metal’s mode threshold which is always there. Encountered no EMI, except from my pinpointer. Too lazy to switch frequencies, so the search coil was just moved out of the way. The only time you hear some slight chatter is when you lay the detector down to dig a target.

Most coin targets today were in the 5-7” range. They were not a problem for the Simplex to pick-up. As always there were some deeper targets, that were too deep to dig for. Performance was typical for a DD coil in the 8.5” range. Makes for a really good all purpose search coil that many favor. A breath of fresh air, it feels like when using the Simplex. Very pleased with this coil.

As for my finds, about $11.00 in Canadian clad, $1 and $2 coins, quarters, one nickel and a bunch of pennies, no dimes. And the usual trash.

Will point out, all modes were used, the mode I liked best for hunting Canadian clad was Park 2. Bench testing originally thought I would have preferred Park 1, the tones sounded a bit cleaner and crispier.

Next outing, will be checking out the 9.5 x 5” coil. Stay tuned.
Since you have tried both the stock coil and now the round, would you prefer the stock coil over the round if you didn't need a smaller coil? If I'm hunting yards and parks and I don't mind the larger coil, what advantage will I gain by using the round coil?
 
Simplex Hunt with the NEW 8.5” Searchcoil


Part 1
By Sven Stau
July 12, 2020
Now I have read all about people having complaints the Simplex is to chattery and just noisy to use. So Nokta/Makro came out with Update 2.78 for those that don’t want a hot rod of a detector. My Simplex has not been updated to 2.78, didn’t feel the need to. Loaded on my Simplex is 2.77.

After a number of hours bench testing targets of various sorts from coins to gold and silver rings indoors. There was really no EMI issues living in this high rise. Maybe just a bit of noise at 7 bars, max. sensitivity. Much more quiet at 6 bars and silent or almost at 5 bars. This gave some indication how the detector would react in the wild.

Both new 8.5” round DD and the 9.5 x 5” coils were bench tested for air depth, reaction time, target ID, masking. First off, both coils are of the usaul high quality found supplied with Nokta/Makros other upper end detectors. They did not cheapen out, just because the Simplex is supposed to be an entry level detector. Both coils were impressive on the bench. Both coils would will really enhance a detectorists detecting ability to handle much more situations, hunting styles and types of hunting.

Both coils have no issues locating the usual good targets most are after. Target ID’s are more accurate, junk targets do bounce or have somewhat consistent ID numbers. Modes seem a bit better defined. Pinpointing is much easier, center of the 8.5” coil if using the pinpoint button or edge of the coils tip if using the pull back method.

Canadians will be interested on how it fares with the Canadian nickel plated steel clad coins.

There have been a number of different compositions of these clad coins over the years. Current clad coins are really junk. While the older composition coins can be difficult to ID due to some number bounce or whether they are lying flat or on edge. The older coins are not to difficult to find once you master their signature tones and ID number. They will mostly fall in the 60-72 number range. There will be exceptions. As for current composition coins. You will have to get your head around most detectors see them as rash targets. They will ID in the lower numbers such as 10-14 number range, if they are on edge, they drop ID numbers into the iron range 04-06 on average. That’s like nail range, so if you get a tight narrow target, or clipped audio sound that is not the usual nail double blip sound. Then you may as well check it out. Some of the older coins lying on edge will also ID in the 04-06 range.

Some want to know how depth will compare between the round and oval coils. Because they are DD, the round coils will get better depth. But, the oval coil have an edge hunting in very very trashy areas, where depth is not a factor. And will be better getting into tight spaces, such as corn stubble for farm field hunters. Air testing has shown the 8.5” coil gets close to the stock 11” coil air depth.

Saw others were asking about the coils weight. Some may find them a bit heavy, they are not super lightweight like those found on other detectors. As I recall they have to be heavier, the main reason is that the Simplex is both a land and water hunting detector. The coil has to be heavier so it will not try to raise to the surface. Like a beach ball when pushed under water, which takes a lot of human pressure to keep it down. If hunting in salt water, if the coils are not neutrally buoyant they will float unlike hunting in freshwater. So the Simplex being a dual purpose detector is probably not much different than other similar detectors. If the Simplex was strictly a land detector, super light weight coils could be made. And the Simplex would feel much lighter in weight more like the Quest detectors.

Today, went out to field test the 8.5” round DD coil. To a schoolyard hunted in the past, wasn’t too concerned if I didn’t find much or anything old. It was just to see how the coil handled the soil and performed among all the trash………………locating Canadian coins.

The Simplex was turned on and ground balanced. Notched out only the first bar, which I really didn’t have to do. First thing that was noticed, at 7 bars, max. sensitivity it ran stable and quiet. Didn’t matter which mode I was in. At 6 bars the Simplex was almost dead quiet. At 5 bars, basically a silent hunting detector. Except for All Metal’s mode threshold which is always there. Encountered no EMI, except from my pinpointer. Too lazy to switch frequencies, so the search coil was just moved out of the way. The only time you hear some slight chatter is when you lay the detector down to dig a target.

Most coin targets today were in the 5-7” range. They were not a problem for the Simplex to pick-up. As always there were some deeper targets, that were too deep to dig for. Performance was typical for a DD coil in the 8.5” range. Makes for a really good all purpose search coil that many favor. A breath of fresh air, it feels like when using the Simplex. Very pleased with this coil.

As for my finds, about $11.00 in Canadian clad, $1 and $2 coins, quarters, one nickel and a bunch of pennies, no dimes. And the usual trash.

Will point out, all modes were used, the mode I liked best for hunting Canadian clad was Park 2. Bench testing originally thought I would have preferred Park 1, the tones sounded a bit cleaner and crispier.

Next outing, will be checking out the 9.5 x 5” coil. Stay tuned.
If your machine is 2.78 can you go back to 2.77? Thank you!
 
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