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Metal Arrowhead Identification

Not that long ago I went out and metal detected my backyard, which was at one point a small farm that ran back in the late 1800's. I went around the older end of the farm near the western edge of my property line and managed to dig this up while going on an all-metal mode with my metal detector, as I sometimes like to see what I get sometimes. I ended up getting this, which I'm definitely sure is an arrowhead as it seems to have been attachable to an arrow shaft at one point in the past.

If you guys can help identify it's age/history that'd be cool. If you need any idea of my region, I live in the upper peninsula of Michigan and I am not that far from the border with Wisconsin on the western side of the peninsula. I live in a region where there was a lot of mining activity, Native American activity, fur trader/trapper activity, anything dealing with more of an off-grid way of life from the rest of the U.S basically to put it in short terms.

If you need a different photo angle, information, etc - just let me know. I'm just interested to see how old this arrowhead is.

IMG_0239.JPG IMG_0243.JPG
 

Steve(Can)

Well-known member
Ben Pearson broad head

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From the link below:

Ben Pearson made his first bow based on articles for Boy Scouts by Dan Beard. In 1926 Pearson entered the state championships using his own equipment; finishing next to last. Learning from the experience, he made new equipment and in 1927 he became the Arkansas State Champion. Pearson continued in competitive archery, and by 1938 he placed seventh in the NAA National Tournament, just behind future employee Pat Chambers, and 24 places above Fred Bear.[2]

Prior to 1938 Pearson marketed his arrows through a series of eleven pamphlets, resulting in the first full Ben Pearson Inc. catalog being listed as "No. 12". That first catalog also only listed arrows, with bows added in the 1939 catalog.[3]

By the early 1950s Ben Pearson Inc. was best known for its relatively inexpensive archery sets. To make more people aware of the higher end custom bows and arrows Pearson was still crafting to special order; the 1958 Catalog introduced higher-end bows with names rather than just model numbers.[1]

In 1963, Ben Pearson Inc. was selling 3,000 bows and 3–4,000 arrows per day. In 1967 the company was acquired by Leisure Group, which dropped the highest-end bows from production. In 1972, Leisure Group sold Ben Pearson Archery to the Brunswick Corporation. By the company's 50th anniversary (198:geek: it had 350 employees and $100 million in payroll.[1] That year, the company presented Governor Bill Clinton with the six millionth bow, and 200 millionth arrow manufactured.

 

Steve(Can)

Well-known member
Oh man, I was thinking it came from a alien predator weapon.
Maybe if Ronstar said he found it. :ROFLMAO:

A better pic, listed as a Pearson 4x4 broadhead. The patent for this arrowhead was filed Aug 27, 1938 (US2182320A)

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I always like finding out the origins of some of the things I find out there, because sometimes I find pretty unique things. The patent for the arrow makes sense considering that's right around the time when the farm was still in operation presumably, pretty nice little find to add to my collection for sure after reading it's history, didn't expect it to be such a unique arrowhead when I dug it up at first. I mean, it's one of the oldest arrowheads that was patented by Ben Pearson according to the internet! That's pretty cool if you ask me. Out of everything else I've found so far on this property, it's been mostly stuff from like 1900 - 1950, but that doesn't mean I haven't found anything older than that though - sometimes you just find the right spot. Thank you for the information! Really helps make my search way easier.
 
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Ronstar

Well-known member
Ya all gonna have to wait until next April........but maybe I would have identified as one prong on a seven prong liver scratcher!
 

Steve(Can)

Well-known member
Ya all gonna have to wait until next April........but maybe I would have identified as one prong on a seven prong liver scratcher!
There's an old saying that comes to mind, Ronstar... It takes many deeds to build a good reputation but only one to lose it.
Got an eye on you.:cautious:
 

Ronstar

Well-known member
Hey it was early and no second cup of coffee yet. Ok, it was a junk earring from a lost Indian maiden????Her name was Poca something
 

Ronstar

Well-known member
Well, she would be a ghostly figure now!!!😂😂
 
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