Find's Treasure Forums

Welcome to Find's Treasure Forums, Guests!

You are viewing this forums as a guest which limits you to read only status.

Only registered members may post stories, questions, classifieds, reply to other posts, contact other members using built in messaging and use many other features found on these forums.

Why not register and join us today? It's free! (We don't share your email addresses with anyone.) We keep email addresses of our users to protect them and others from bad people posting things they shouldn't.

Click here to register!



Need Support Help?

Cannot log in?, click here to have new password emailed to you

Changed email? Forgot to update your account with new email address? Need assistance with something else?, click here to go to Find's Support Form and fill out the form.

NOKTA MAKRO (LEGEND) GETTING SUED - PATENT INFRINGEMENT

Status
Not open for further replies.

CoinShooter01

Well-known member
Help me understand why you think this is good news. Were you somehow harmed by Nokta?

Do you have personal knowledge - actual knowledge, not just a presumption based on bias - of Nokta stealing intellectual property? If so, can you describe in detail the intellectual property supposedly stolen?

Minelab has a bit of history with this sort of thing. They threatened to sue Whites - unfortunately Whites capitulated and agreed to pay Minelab. Minelab sued XP and lost. I think I recall reading (somewhere) that Minelab sued First Texas and lost (not positive about that, and I'm too lazy to look it up).

Minelab has a boatload of money. They can afford to use legal threats as a means of bludgeoning the competition into capitulation - knowing that even a loss on their part forces the competition to spend more limited resources defending themselves.

Protecting intellectual property is one thing. If... and I'd bet that is a very big IF - Nokta actually did infringe on Minelab's intellectual property, then Minelab should take steps to protect their property. That said, it would be unreasonable to think Nokta doesn't have a legal team that fully examined all of Minelab's patents before they started working on the Legend (or any other model). Unless Nokta's legal team is/was utterly incompetent, it is highly unlikely that Nokta infringed upon Minelab's patents.

If this lawsuit is - as I suspect, it to be - a bullying maneuver on the part of Minelab, then we in the relatively small metal detecting community stand to lose a lot if Minelab's attempts to bully bear fruit. Celebrating that is either short-sighted or outright foolish.
I have absolutely no knowledge of whats under the hood.
Im 100% certain that Minelab does!
Im also 100% certain that it will get resolved, one way or another, in a court of law.
 

BobOso

Well-known member
But i wonder how you can tell the difference between a counterfeit ML and the real one.
Another thing to note and makes you wonder the real premise behind this farcical lawsuit is why no lawsuits or actions against those counterfeit detectors.
Again i just call balls and strikes.
Just like I love my kids but if they do something wrong i will call them out on it.
Then there are those parents(fans) where their kids can do no wrong.
A detector in one hand and the other their kid in the isle of a store screaming, No I want it,🤣
on the PI machines there is a hologram with the serial numbers, and the serial numbers can be checked on the ML site. as far a suing China, it is impossible which is why the Chinese copy everything they think they can make $ on.
 

CoinRobber

Active member
on the PI machines there is a hologram with the serial numbers, and the serial numbers can be checked on the ML site. as far a suing China, it is impossible which is why the Chinese copy everything they think they can make $ on.
I often wonder how these fake gpz minelabs actually perform. I heard they do well but no one will ever post information. I wonder how many fakes there are out there.
 

DigDog

Well-known member
on the PI machines there is a hologram with the serial numbers, and the serial numbers can be checked on the ML site. as far a suing China, it is impossible which is why the Chinese copy everything they think they can make $ on.
Only hologram in the PI or all of them?
 

DigDog

Well-known member
. as far a suing China, it is impossible which is why the Chinese copy everything they think they can make $ on. everything is impossible if you don’t have the will and don’t try.
Everything is impossible if you don’t have the will and don’t try.And as a result of this thought process China will eventually take over the world and we will all be controlled by the CCP.
Low hanging fruit is always easy to pick.
But what we have here is Goliath taking on David. Some will root for David some will root for Goliath.
I don’t see how suing all their competitors is going to benefit anyone but them. As i said with this mindset we would all be driving Fords and paying outrageous prices.
 

Tahts-a-dats-ago

Well-known member
I have absolutely no knowledge of whats under the hood.
Im 100% certain that Minelab does!
Im also 100% certain that it will get resolved, one way or another, in a court of law.

I have no doubt that Minelab knows exactly what is "under the hood" of the Legend, but that doesn't explain why you're so eager to celebrate Minelab's actions.

Without personal knowledge of some sort of intellectual theft going on, your opening post strongly suggests a bias against Nokta; which leads me to ponder my prior question about any supposed harm that Nokta may have caused you.

Just so you're aware of the thought process behind Minelab's lawsuit....

Prior to the release of the Legend, I was speaking with a local Minelab dealer - he's a huge Minelab fan - who is not a Nokta dealer. He told me, in person, that he was buying a couple of Legends (at Minelab's request) as soon they became available, so he could ship them to Minelab so they [Minelab] could go through them with a fine-tooth comb and find out what was "under the hood".

That, in itself, isn't unusual in my opinion. Companies routinely familiarize themselves with the competition's products in order to better frame their marketing efforts, mitigate potential weaknesses in their own product line, and capitalize on their product's strengths.

Couple it with Minelab's lawsuit and it does hint that Minelab may have planned, before the Legend hit the market, to use legal threats as retaliation against a competitor that dared to offer a product that directly competes.

If our trust is placed in the courts, then it would behoove us to recall the standard of presumed innocence. In that, the onus is on Minelab to prove their claims.

I can't help but wondering how Minelab would have reacted if the Legend had been a sales flop.

Would Minelab sue over a sales failure?

If not, their actions seemingly appear to be based less on protecting their intellectual property, and more on trying to harm their competition.

Wherever this lawsuit goes, I suspect the end result is not a positive as far as the metal detecting community is concerned.
 

DigDog

Well-known member
I have no doubt that Minelab knows exactly what is "under the hood" of the Legend, but that doesn't explain why you're so eager to celebrate Minelab's actions.

Without personal knowledge of some sort of intellectual theft going on, your opening post strongly suggests a bias against Nokta; which leads me to ponder my prior question about any supposed harm that Nokta may have caused you.

Just so you're aware of the thought process behind Minelab's lawsuit....

Prior to the release of the Legend, I was speaking with a local Minelab dealer - he's a huge Minelab fan - who is not a Nokta dealer. He told me, in person, that he was buying a couple of Legends (at Minelab's request) as soon they became available, so he could ship them to Minelab so they [Minelab] could go through them with a fine-tooth comb and find out what was "under the hood".

That, in itself, isn't unusual in my opinion. Companies routinely familiarize themselves with the competition's products in order to better frame their marketing efforts, mitigate potential weaknesses in their own product line, and capitalize on their product's strengths.

Couple it with Minelab's lawsuit and it does hint that Minelab may have planned, before the Legend hit the market, to use legal threats as retaliation against a competitor that dared to offer a product that directly competes.

If our trust is placed in the courts, then it would behoove us to recall the standard of presumed innocence. In that, the onus is on Minelab to prove their claims.

I can't help but wondering how Minelab would have reacted if the Legend had been a sales flop.

Would Minelab sue over a sales failure?

If not, their actions seemingly appear to be based less on protecting their intellectual property, and more on trying to harm their competition.

Wherever this lawsuit goes, I suspect the end result is not a positive as far as the metal detecting community is concerned.
Everyone is entitled to an opinion but the thing is and you obviously see it, not just me. Just have to go back through threads and read the history. When someone who never owned a NM legend, nor has any interest or intention in owning one. continues to go to the NM forums and post derogatory remarks, content, and on the other hand has nothing but praise about ML, never admitting to any issues, failures, even a dislike about any ML, thats intentional bias hatred.
Have to take what they say with a grain of salt.
Post anything negative even a dislike on a ML, oh boy…
 

DigDog

Well-known member
I have no doubt that Minelab knows exactly what is "under the hood" of the Legend, but that doesn't explain why you're so eager to celebrate Minelab's actions.

Without personal knowledge of some sort of intellectual theft going on, your opening post strongly suggests a bias against Nokta; which leads me to ponder my prior question about any supposed harm that Nokta may have caused you.

Just so you're aware of the thought process behind Minelab's lawsuit....

Prior to the release of the Legend, I was speaking with a local Minelab dealer - he's a huge Minelab fan - who is not a Nokta dealer. He told me, in person, that he was buying a couple of Legends (at Minelab's request) as soon they became available, so he could ship them to Minelab so they [Minelab] could go through them with a fine-tooth comb and find out what was "under the hood".

That, in itself, isn't unusual in my opinion. Companies routinely familiarize themselves with the competition's products in order to better frame their marketing efforts, mitigate potential weaknesses in their own product line, and capitalize on their product's strengths.

Couple it with Minelab's lawsuit and it does hint that Minelab may have planned, before the Legend hit the market, to use legal threats as retaliation against a competitor that dared to offer a product that directly competes.

If our trust is placed in the courts, then it would behoove us to recall the standard of presumed innocence. In that, the onus is on Minelab to prove their claims.

I can't help but wondering how Minelab would have reacted if the Legend had been a sales flop.

Would Minelab sue over a sales failure?

If not, their actions seemingly appear to be based less on protecting their intellectual property, and more on trying to harm their competition.

Wherever this lawsuit goes, I suspect the end result is not a positive as far as the metal detecting community is concerned.
Said better than i could btw.
 
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top