Find's Treasure Forums

Welcome to Find's Treasure Forums, Guests!

You are viewing this forums as a guest which limits you to read only status.

Only registered members may post stories, questions, classifieds, reply to other posts, contact other members using built in messaging and use many other features found on these forums.

Why not register and join us today? It's free! (We don't share your email addresses with anyone.) We keep email addresses of our users to protect them and others from bad people posting things they shouldn't.

Click here to register!



Need Support Help?

Cannot log in?, click here to have new password emailed to you

Changed email? Forgot to update your account with new email address? Need assistance with something else?, click here to go to Find's Support Form and fill out the form.

Nokta Makro suggestions and thoughts

Big Treble

Active member
So just thought I would start this. I do like many of the features of this machine, but there are a few things, that makes this NOT my go to machine when I hit a spot.

I would like to have a audio systen that is as customizable as it currently is, however is consistent from one program to another. As I understand it the changes between programs like 3 tone 4 tone and 5 tone, are not just the number of tones but the gain, and I believe recovery speed.

Myself I prefer 5 tones, but occasionally may want the pre defined proccessor setting of 3 tone and not the chatty High gain of 5 tone. There are points in my all day hunts where i mentally toggle fro wanting to hear every beep and needing 15 minutes of selected swinging. Currently with this machine, if i flip to a more quieter 3 tone, then I mentally need to relearn what targets are are in what tone bracket. I use the screen for verification, not as a primary target ID.

Am I off base?
 

Dave_E

Member
The Simplex+ is like that by design. Very simple with limited settings, but expert performance.
Their higher end machines have the ability you want. Fully customizable tone bins. Not just the sound, but move the bins up or down the VID scale.
 

Big Treble

Active member
The Simplex+ is like that by design. Very simple with limited settings, but expert performance.
Their higher end machines have the ability you want. Fully customizable tone bins. Not just the sound, but move the bins up or down the VID scale.
I have the anfibio, sorry i may not have been clear but my issue is that recovery and somehting similar to a pre amp gain is pre set based on the number of tones. Perhaps I've been spoiled by a couple other manufacturers
 

kevinnc

Member
I have the gain cut back and saved in all the tones except 3 tone. The other tones allow you too run the machine too hot to try and squeeze out more depth if you want.
 

Big Treble

Active member
I have the gain cut back and saved in all the tones except 3 tone. The other tones allow you too run the machine too hot to try and squeeze out more depth if you want.
Yeah, I've thought about this, sometimes think if i go lighter than preset on gain its like using a vacuum on low speed and only picking up part of the dirt. Lol
 
I'm not sure I understand what you are saying. Like kevinnc, I have programmed and saved the settings I desire for each mode. I sometimes need to make some minor adjustments depending on the site I am detecting, including which coil to use. I have discovered that I also often adjust my settings depending if I'm using the 11" stock coil or the 7" concentric. If you are getting too many signals, simply move the discrimination up. I often run it at 20, and sometimes all the way up to 50. The depth meter is important to me also, as I am mainly interested in the older, and usually deeper, targets.
 

Big Treble

Active member
I'm not sure I understand what you are saying. Like kevinnc, I have programmed and saved the settings I desire for each mode. I sometimes need to make some minor adjustments depending on the site I am detecting, including which coil to use. I have discovered that I also often adjust my settings depending if I'm using the 11" stock coil or the 7" concentric. If you are getting too many signals, simply move the discrimination up. I often run it at 20, and sometimes all the way up to 50. The depth meter is important to me also, as I am mainly interested in the older, and usually deeper, targets.
I've had and currently have other detetors where i can have multiple programs set up with minor to major changes, all using the same tone profiles, so I can toggle through programs based on the site, the change in the site or my energy lever throughout the day. Just wish i had that option with the anfibio. To toggle through programs here I can't change without having a substan3 tone profile change.
 

Monte

Well-known member
So just thought I would start this. I do like many of the features of this machine (Anfibio), but there are a few things, that makes this NOT my go to machine when I hit a spot.

I would like to have a audio systen that is as customizable as it currently is, however is consistent from one program to another. As I understand it the changes between programs like 3 tone 4 tone and 5 tone, are not just the number of tones but the gain, and I believe recovery speed.


Myself I prefer 5 tones, but occasionally may want the pre defined proccessor setting of 3 tone and not the chatty High gain of 5 tone. There are points in my all day hunts where i mentally toggle fro wanting to hear every beep and needing 15 minutes of selected swinging. Currently with this machine, if i flip to a more quieter 3 tone, then I mentally need to relearn what targets are are in what tone bracket. I use the screen for verification, not as a primary target ID.

Am I off base?
Well, let's figure out the unknowns to better help with thoughts and suggestions.

• If the Anfibio is NOT your 'go-to' detector when you hit a spot, what it? What make, model and 'modes' or 'programs' do you use with it?

• How long have you been metal detecting, and what types of hunt sites do you most often search?


• Nokta / Makro could have kept things simple-and-easy, but instead produced different models as they progressed that have been
(or appear to be) more 'consumer-based' than many competitors. It would have been easy to make one model with all design and performance functions the same and change ONLY the number of 'programs', aka 'modes', with the only difference being the number of audio Tones. That would call for a lot of user-adjustable functions for consumers to learn and also increase the number of adjustable features that could make the detector very 'busy.' When you go from a 'basic' single-tone detector 'mode' to a 2-Tone or 3-Tone or any increase in Audio Tones, you are going to have to learn or remember what the different tones are where a specific target reads.

By design, they did engineer the various modes with some 'built-in' performance differences, such as Gain or Recovery Speed, etc. that give the end-user some 'mode' or audio tone options that just might be better suited for those who are likely to make use of a particular mode. For example, the more tones used often suggests the detector will need to work a bit quicker to receive and process a lot of different conductivity targets that are more closely spaced and that would call for a quicker-response and faster-recovery. Thus, by-design, a lot of that is already designed-in with the different mode functions 'in-software' rather than by a user-adjustable function. One nice thing is that just because a lot of extra search modes or adjustment functions might be on a model, we are not compelled to make use of everything if it isn't a real need or a good match for the types of detecting we do. It's impossible to make a 'One Size Fits All' detector that is going to be perfect for everyone, and the best any manufacturer can do is make a 'One Size Fits Many' ... then have available other models down the line that are less featured and/or might actually make a better fit for some consumers.

• Sometimes, even the top-end models do not offer some functions that some of us might desire that is available even on their lower-end device. I've been enjoying this great outdoor sport for a long, long time and there are certain things I have learned to like, which is why I own and use a Detector Outfit and not only one or maybe two detectors. As of this moment I have 9 detectors in my personal Outfit made up of 7 different models since I have duplicate of two of them. Of those 7 different models, the Nokta CoRe, Relic, Impact and Simplex+ make up 4 of the 7. I got my first Nokta detector on January 8th of 2015 and was very impressed with the design, comfortable weight and balance, and the in-the-field performance. I have owned all of the newer models since that one, and I liked some better than others along the way. I really like the Anfibio Multi, but for several personal preference reasons, I just bough a brand new Impact this past month to serve as my 'top-end' detector model. It lacks some of what the Anfibio offers, but it also has more modes than I care to have and some adjustment functions I very seldom use, and, like the Anfibio Multi, it lacks some of the audio performance between search modes that I have on their lower-priced Simplex+. One performance I would like to select on the other models, but I can't. That is VCO audio and the option to turn it 'Off' which many models do not provide in a 2-Tone mode. But my preferred mode on the Simplex+ is the Beach mode and it isn't VCO-enhanced like the Field mode.

• Are you off-base? No. Everyone who uses any brand or any model detector should have some dislikes about it. I know I do, and always have, with any detector I've owned since early '65, and that's a good thing. We each should learn our detectors to know them well and be aware of both the strengths and weaknesses. The likes and dislikes. So, No, you're not "off base" EXCEPT, what I see is what I often read about on many metal detecting Forums about just about any detector. And what is that? It is people who seem to be too bothered by one or maybe a few things and then complain about it. If it is a serious manufacturing oversight, then that's OK ... to a point to point it out.

But what I much rather like to read are posts made by people who have learned a detector well, and might know of the weaknesses or things they don't like, but instead they key in on the good things about a detector. The strengths a unit offers, the performance it provides, and the positive points about the overall detector design. I enjoy that more because I might learn something new and beneficial to me. And because as the operator uses the device and has success afield, they often mention the positive things about a mode or search behavior the detector offers and then I know that they are enjoying the detector, enjoying the search experience, and are having success afield. I can learn from that, and that's a positive thing.

So, you're not off-base to not like some things about the Anfibio, but if any detector make or model bothers someone that much, I feel the best thing to do is either:

1.. Spend more time learning the finer point of the detector
... or ...
2.. Sell or trade it away and buy a detector that would let them enjoy the sport and not complain too much.

Just my take,

Monte
 

Big Treble

Active member
Well, let's figure out the unknowns to better help with thoughts and suggestions.

• If the Anfibio is NOT your 'go-to' detector when you hit a spot, what it? What make, model and 'modes' or 'programs' do you use with it?

• How long have you been metal detecting, and what types of hunt sites do you most often search?


• Nokta / Makro could have kept things simple-and-easy, but instead produced different models as they progressed that have been (or appear to be) more 'consumer-based' than many competitors. It would have been easy to make one model with all design and performance functions the same and change ONLY the number of 'programs', aka 'modes', with the only difference being the number of audio Tones. That would call for a lot of user-adjustable functions for consumers to learn and also increase the number of adjustable features that could make the detector very 'busy.' When you go from a 'basic' single-tone detector 'mode' to a 2-Tone or 3-Tone or any increase in Audio Tones, you are going to have to learn or remember what the different tones are where a specific target reads.

By design, they did engineer the various modes with some 'built-in' performance differences, such as Gain or Recovery Speed, etc. that give the end-user some 'mode' or audio tone options that just might be better suited for those who are likely to make use of a particular mode. For example, the more tones used often suggests the detector will need to work a bit quicker to receive and process a lot of different conductivity targets that are more closely spaced and that would call for a quicker-response and faster-recovery. Thus, by-design, a lot of that is already designed-in with the different mode functions 'in-software' rather than by a user-adjustable function. One nice thing is that just because a lot of extra search modes or adjustment functions might be on a model, we are not compelled to make use of everything if it isn't a real need or a good match for the types of detecting we do. It's impossible to make a 'One Size Fits All' detector that is going to be perfect for everyone, and the best any manufacturer can do is make a 'One Size Fits Many' ... then have available other models down the line that are less featured and/or might actually make a better fit for some consumers.

• Sometimes, even the top-end models do not offer some functions that some of us might desire that is available even on their lower-end device. I've been enjoying this great outdoor sport for a long, long time and there are certain things I have learned to like, which is why I own and use a Detector Outfit and not only one or maybe two detectors. As of this moment I have 9 detectors in my personal Outfit made up of 7 different models since I have duplicate of two of them. Of those 7 different models, the Nokta CoRe, Relic, Impact and Simplex+ make up 4 of the 7. I got my first Nokta detector on January 8th of 2015 and was very impressed with the design, comfortable weight and balance, and the in-the-field performance. I have owned all of the newer models since that one, and I liked some better than others along the way. I really like the Anfibio Multi, but for several personal preference reasons, I just bough a brand new Impact this past month to serve as my 'top-end' detector model. It lacks some of what the Anfibio offers, but it also has more modes than I care to have and some adjustment functions I very seldom use, and, like the Anfibio Multi, it lacks some of the audio performance between search modes that I have on their lower-priced Simplex+. One performance I would like to select on the other models, but I can't. That is VCO audio and the option to turn it 'Off' which many models do not provide in a 2-Tone mode. But my preferred mode on the Simplex+ is the Beach mode and it isn't VCO-enhanced like the Field mode.

• Are you off-base? No. Everyone who uses any brand or any model detector should have some dislikes about it. I know I do, and always have, with any detector I've owned since early '65, and that's a good thing. We each should learn our detectors to know them well and be aware of both the strengths and weaknesses. The likes and dislikes. So, No, you're not "off base" EXCEPT, what I see is what I often read about on many metal detecting Forums about just about any detector. And what is that? It is people who seem to be too bothered by one or maybe a few things and then complain about it. If it is a serious manufacturing oversight, then that's OK ... to a point to point it out.

But what I much rather like to read are posts made by people who have learned a detector well, and might know of the weaknesses or things they don't like, but instead they key in on the good things about a detector. The strengths a unit offers, the performance it provides, and the positive points about the overall detector design. I enjoy that more because I might learn something new and beneficial to me. And because as the operator uses the device and has success afield, they often mention the positive things about a mode or search behavior the detector offers and then I know that they are enjoying the detector, enjoying the search experience, and are having success afield. I can learn from that, and that's a positive thing.

So, you're not off-base to not like some things about the Anfibio, but if any detector make or model bothers someone that much, I feel the best thing to do is either:

1.. Spend more time learning the finer point of the detector
... or ...
2.. Sell or trade it away and buy a detector that would let them enjoy the sport and not complain too much.

Just my take,

Monte
Lot of info there, I will do my best to answer your questions.

I've been detecting 10 years, and my past experience is ACE 250, 350 ATPRO V3i, Etrac CTX and Anfibio. Which I still have and use the Ctx, V3i and the Anfibio. None of the programs on any of the machines I use are stock and all have been edited by me, so providing that info would be ineffective. I hunt mostly for silver coins, but mostly in trashy pre 1900 sites. So I grabbed the Anfibio because I wanted a faster, machine to help me pick through iron.

My reasoning for this post was not meant to complain, i do like the Anfibio and many features about it. I have zero plans to sell it. And have benn using it for about a year. I certainly don't claim to be the Guru detectorist, but dont feel my suggestion I provided was due to lack of knowledge of the tool.

The reason I brought this up, is it seems like Nokta Makro actually listens to their customers more than any other manufacturer out there. I suppose if someone hasn't used or built custom prorgrams for the V's or the FBS machines above, they might not understand where I'm going with this or what I'm saying.

Bottom line is i like my Anfibio a lot, just hoping N/M could build more user defined controls so the user can set the detector to what they want, not have to adapt to what the detector wants. I believe the days of adapting to stringent preset controls may either be passing by. Technology con only change so quick, but letting the user build what he or she wants into the tool is a viable vehicle between shifts in technology.
 

Monte

Well-known member
Big Treble, 'Thank You' for the reply, and I do understand what you're wishing for. The manufacturers can make things simply by what a design engineer would like to do, and I've seen it where the direction came from 'upstairs', by an owner or manager who doesn't really detect at all or hasn't n a long, long time so they are not up on performance features and functions. Then we have a very few design engineers or company managers/marketers who pay attention to some of the wishes they hear from consumers and they do their best to satisfy most of their perceived customer base. I like the latter group.

To do so, they can't please everyone, but they do try to satisfy the bulk of their marketing group. Even their lowest-end model, the Simp0lex +, has a lot of features to satisfy many consumers, and it is equipped with far more adjustment features than many of their competitor's models at double to price. Still, by design, they eliminated two important adjustment functions that I would like to have for the Beach mode. I wish I had more user controllability for Ferrous Tone Volume and full, low-end user Discrimination, but I don't.

The Anfibio that you have and are referring to, has a lot more controllability than many detectors, and some of that is built-in or designed-in with the circuitry based on a search mode. To me, that's fine, but you'd like to have almost full-control of all the available adjustment functions. I guess it's up to a manufacturer to decide what they do and don't want to let a consumer tinker with in future production, but know what the Anfibio offers and the performance it can provide, I wish you the best at learning al of its strengths and weaknesses and getting it set up with what it does offer, and then enjoy getting out hunting with it.

Monte
 
Top