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Rice and waterlogged detector??

Monkeys Uncle

Well-known member
Was just wondering if anyone knows whether submersion in rice would cure a waterlogged metal detector??? Hasn't happened to me or mine, but tv commercial (cell phones) got me to wondering. Anyone know? :unsure:
 

Ronstar

Well-known member
Good Q? Will be watching.......
 

irnwrkr

Active member
if someone tries it i would prrsonally recommend uncooked or raw rice. Not so sticky
 

wltdwiz

Well-known member
it would help
 

GeorgeinSC

Well-known member
a few years back i accidentally dipped my sovereign gt in the surf. Did all i could to clean it with electronics cleaner and used rice also. After a period of time the corrosion ruined the mother board. Might have gotten rid of the moisture but the salt remained.
 

Taxidea

Member
Totally agree, if you're dealing with salt water you'd have to get rid of the salt. That's usually done with a couple of DI or distilled water rinses before drying. This would usually involve disassembly before the rinses then blotting and low pressure air jetting dry to get rid of most of the moisture so it could get a bit involved. (I have used that to recover quite a few electronic items but never a detector). The rice trick works on some cell phones because the volume small and it is likely they were not completely saturated (and hopefully not with salt water). It works good on cell phones and other electronics that were left out in the rain (common) because rain is pretty close to distilled water. Would I try the rice trick on a detector that was left out in rain? Yes. Would I try it on one that was dropped in or swamped by saltwater? Maybe, if it wasn't one near and dear to me but probably not. Just my thoughts.
 

bigtim1973

Active member
One day while washing my car, I had my cell phone in my shirt pocket.

It flipped out of my pocket and straight into the bucket totally submerged.

I took it apart and took a hair dryer and blew it completely dry.
I reinstalled the battery and worked good as new without any issues.

So I do believe you could do the same with a detector.
 

u2robert

Well-known member
Totally agree, if you're dealing with salt water you'd have to get rid of the salt. That's usually done with a couple of DI or distilled water rinses before drying. This would usually involve disassembly before the rinses then blotting and low pressure air jetting dry to get rid of most of the moisture so it could get a bit involved. (I have used that to recover quite a few electronic items but never a detector). The rice trick works on some cell phones because the volume small and it is likely they were not completely saturated (and hopefully not with salt water). It works good on cell phones and other electronics that were left out in the rain (common) because rain is pretty close to distilled water. Would I try the rice trick on a detector that was left out in rain? Yes. Would I try it on one that was dropped in or swamped by saltwater? Maybe, if it wasn't one near and dear to me but probably not. Just my thoughts.
A detector or any electronics that been submerged in salt water needs to be rinsed with freshwater before drying.
 
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