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Simplex+ Sucessor?

hodr

Active member
So I have been on a 5+ year break from detecting and i'm looking to get back into things. My old detector is a White's V3i with a million accessories. I wanted something more turn-on and go, and I also periodically considered buying a water detector, so this seems like I good choice (my other thoughts were ACE 400 or AT Pro).

Anyways, I started looking at for videos and noticed many reviews from November of 19 (so the detector is a couple years old), and now I read in the forum that they aren't going to produce anymore firmware or coils. So does this mean they are coming out with a new version soon, or even worse that they may be abandoning the sub $300 market segment?
 

Chuck M

Member
You might want to look at the Minelab Equinox or Vanquish 540. I would consider these over the Garrett's as they are multi-frequeintcy and that's a game changer
 

JCR TX

Well-known member
I'm pretty sure the Simplex is one of the best selling detectors on the market. I don't think it is anywhere near retirement. It is the one that shook up the whole price vs performance debate.
 

jim tn

Well-known member
I agree with you, JCR. It well out performs its price point and has pushed me into trading 2 more expensive detectors and selling another outright. HH jim tn
 

Monte

Well-known member
Some brand-new detectors, even many that cost above average price, are not very impressive. They don't sell very well, they're not very comfortable, they are too complex or too simple for many of the detecting tasks we have, and in some cases they're just ugly.

And yet we have some makes and models that are very versatile and can take on many detecting applications and do very well, yet we find them to be replaced with a new model when they don't need to be. Some are exceptional performers for many tasks, and can be kept in a working detector outfit for a long time. I have my two all-time favorite Tesoro models that I use often, and that's a company that is now defunct, but the product is very solid, very reliable, and continues to serve.

We have other models from current manufacturers who are providing top-end quality, such as the Nokta FORS CoRe and FORS Relic, that were discontinued. I can assure you, that did not mean they lost their exceptional performance making them some of the best detectors to grab for some get-serious work in Iron infested locations.

My Relic w/5" DD stays at-the-ready in my detector outfit, along with my two proven Tesoro models, and along with my Garrett and XP devices I also have my Simplex+. It doesn't matter what they come out with, such as a top-end SMF, my Simplex is another reliable performer that will stay in my outfit and stay in use. Don't hesitate to consider one, if it will serve your needs.

Also, while some of the current multi-frequency detectors can perform well for a lot of applications, and I use them myself, it doesn't mean they will always outperform some single-frequency detectors. Back in the 1990s and into the early 2000s, I used a couple of single frequency detectors to hunt the Oregon coastline and matched or bettered the performance of quite a few people using their multi-frequency detectors.

It is not what features a detector has, or what manufacturers suggest in their marketing, but more about what the operator knows, learns, and how it is used.

Monte
 

C.J.M.

Well-known member
You might want to look at the Minelab Equinox or Vanquish 540. I would consider these over the Garrett's as they are multi-frequeintcy and that's a game changer
howdy chuck I have a question are the Vanquish products anything like the exterra-705.70, :shrug:
Some brand-new detectors, even many that cost above average price, are not very impressive. They don't sell very well, they're not very comfortable, they are too complex or too simple for many of the detecting tasks we have, and in some cases they're just ugly.

And yet we have some makes and models that are very versatile and can take on many detecting applications and do very well, yet we find them to be replaced with a new model when they don't need to be. Some are exceptional performers for many tasks, and can be kept in a working detector outfit for a long time. I have my two all-time favorite Tesoro models that I use often, and that's a company that is now defunct, but the product is very solid, very reliable, and continues to serve.

We have other models from current manufacturers who are providing top-end quality, such as the Nokta FORS CoRe and FORS Relic, that were discontinued. I can assure you, that did not mean they lost their exceptional performance making them some of the best detectors to grab for some get-serious work in Iron infested locations.

My Relic w/5" DD stays at-the-ready in my detector outfit, along with my two proven Tesoro models, and along with my Garrett and XP devices I also have my Simplex+. It doesn't matter what they come out with, such as a top-end SMF, my Simplex is another reliable performer that will stay in my outfit and stay in use. Don't hesitate to consider one, if it will serve your needs.

Also, while some of the current multi-frequency detectors can perform well for a lot of applications, and I use them myself, it doesn't mean they will always outperform some single-frequency detectors. Back in the 1990s and into the early 2000s, I used a couple of single frequency detectors to hunt the Oregon coastline and matched or bettered the performance of quite a few people using their multi-frequency detectors.

It is not what features a detector has, or what manufacturers suggest in their marketing, but more about what the operator knows, learns, and how it is used.

Monte
HI monte seems like dealers are running out of nels 9.5 x 5" d.d. coils and now Nokta has their own 9.5 X 5. coil .Do you know anything thing concerning this new coil:shrug:
 

Monte

Well-known member
howdy chuck I have a question are the Vanquish products anything like the exterra-705.70, :shrug:
I'm just Monte but had the X-Terra series (30 / 50 / 70) since prior-to at at introduction provided me by Minelab. I bought the Vanquish 540 Pro Pack, 3 of them, and No, they are nothing like the X-Terra series. They are an off-shoot of, and a bit different from, the Multi-IQ Equinox series.

HI monte seems like dealers are running out of nels 9.5 x 5" d.d. coils and now Nokta has their own 9.5 X 5. coil .Do you know anything thing concerning this new coil:shrug:
NEL 5X9½ 'Sharpshooter' coils are, and have been, popular for many makes a m0dels for quite a while.

Nokta and Makro, now Nokta / Makro, have been making their own 5X9½ DD open-frame coils for about 4 years now. They started making them for the FORS CoRe, FORS Relic, Racer 2 and Impact, and have continued to make them for the Kruzer, Anfibio and Simplex + models.

I have one on-hand for my Relic, and keep one mounted full-time on my Simplex +.

Monte
 

hodr

Active member
Some brand-new detectors, even many that cost above average price, are not very impressive. They don't sell very well, they're not very comfortable, they are too complex or too simple for many of the detecting tasks we have, and in some cases they're just ugly.

And yet we have some makes and models that are very versatile and can take on many detecting applications and do very well, yet we find them to be replaced with a new model when they don't need to be. Some are exceptional performers for many tasks, and can be kept in a working detector outfit for a long time. I have my two all-time favorite Tesoro models that I use often, and that's a company that is now defunct, but the product is very solid, very reliable, and continues to serve.

We have other models from current manufacturers who are providing top-end quality, such as the Nokta FORS CoRe and FORS Relic, that were discontinued. I can assure you, that did not mean they lost their exceptional performance making them some of the best detectors to grab for some get-serious work in Iron infested locations.

My Relic w/5" DD stays at-the-ready in my detector outfit, along with my two proven Tesoro models, and along with my Garrett and XP devices I also have my Simplex+. It doesn't matter what they come out with, such as a top-end SMF, my Simplex is another reliable performer that will stay in my outfit and stay in use. Don't hesitate to consider one, if it will serve your needs.

Also, while some of the current multi-frequency detectors can perform well for a lot of applications, and I use them myself, it doesn't mean they will always outperform some single-frequency detectors. Back in the 1990s and into the early 2000s, I used a couple of single frequency detectors to hunt the Oregon coastline and matched or bettered the performance of quite a few people using their multi-frequency detectors.

It is not what features a detector has, or what manufacturers suggest in their marketing, but more about what the operator knows, learns, and how it is used.

Monte

Appreciate the insight. My first detector was the Tesoro Bandido II µMAX, which I bought well used. The company did a complete overhaul on it for me and didn't charge me a dime. Probably why they are out of business now. From there I went to the V3i which is a good detector, but always took a LOT of fiddling for me to get it working just right in a new location. And after so many years off and the knowledge that my future hunts are likely to be impromptu and short, I was hoping to find something a bit simpler. Guess I can wait for Nokta's new multi-frequency machine to see if it's all that much better than their current offerings. I often felt the V3i suffered a bit from the 22khz which seemed to destabilize the bigger coils.
 

Monte

Well-known member
My first detector was the Tesoro Bandido II µMAX, which I bought well used. The company did a complete overhaul on it for me and didn't charge me a dime. Probably why they are out of business now.
That model was, and still is, one of the best that Tesoro ever produced. It is one of my two all-time favorites from that company that has stayed in my personal detector outfit since they were produced in October of 1997.

The company's demise was not from providing very good service they offered, it was partly from marketing and partly because after Jack Gifford retired, they did not have a good engineer, his son was not a good design engineer, and they were just not competitive in today's market of Target ID and Tone ID detectors. I hunt a lot of densely iron contaminated sites and use mine w/6" Concentric to out-perform a lot of modern / current detectors.

I am eager to get a new N/M SMF device in- hand .... but that won't cause me to part with my Simplex + and 5X9.5 DD coil.

Monte
 
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