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Tesoro Diablo umax

lytle78

New member
$500 to some enthusiasts. Very hard to find and not often for sale. I had two - sold them both for more than $400 each.
 

lytle78

New member
Nice light VLF gold nugget hunter. Nowadays you can get comparable performance plus iron ID from several manufacturers. It's a cult machine, hence the price. I sold both of mine and got a Gold Bug 2 - don't regret it.
 

Dave J.

New member
Call me biased if you like (I designed it), but here's my summary.
Light weight easy to use VLF gold machine, about 18 kHz. Manual ground balancing, if you don't have that skill it's not for you. Basic ability to detect a buried gold nugget comparable to the best 15-20 kHz gold machines nowadays. In light mineralization, it doesn't hit very loud so you'll need to use headphones. It excels (compared to most other VLF's) in noisy ground. No "discrimination", but has a second ground balance knob you can access with a flip of a switch to calm down a suspected hot rock, a feature which is to my knowledge unique to the Diablo MicroMax. The GB2 running at 71 kHz will knock its socks off on the smaller nuggets, but costs more. From the perspective of history and platform evolution, it was the analog circuit proving ground for the Lobo Supertraq.

Every design engineer has certain products they're proud of, and ones they're not so proud of. Doesn't necessarily have anything to do with the popularity or market success of the product. It's no secret that I regard the Diablo MicroMax as one of my all-time best designs. Still have one a gift from Jim Straight) and won't part with it.

All that is why 20 years later it has a cult following. Why did Jack take it out of production so soon after its release? I could speculate on that, but bottom line is that I don't know. And Jack's no longer around to answer the question himself.
 

D&P-OR

Well-known member
Dave-----Same question---why did they take the great Bandito 2 micromax out of production & replace it with the Eldorado!---Mistake IMO.----Rusty Henry himself don't know why they ever did that.
Dave J. said:
Call me biased if you like (I designed it), but here's my summary.
Light weight easy to use VLF gold machine, about 18 kHz. Manual ground balancing, if you don't have that skill it's not for you. Basic ability to detect a buried gold nugget comparable to the best 15-20 kHz gold machines nowadays. In light mineralization, it doesn't hit very loud so you'll need to use headphones. It excels (compared to most other VLF's) in noisy ground. No "discrimination", but has a second ground balance knob you can access with a flip of a switch to calm down a suspected hot rock, a feature which is to my knowledge unique to the Diablo MicroMax. The GB2 running at 71 kHz will knock its socks off on the smaller nuggets, but costs more. From the perspective of history and platform evolution, it was the analog circuit proving ground for the Lobo Supertraq.

Every design engineer has certain products they're proud of, and ones they're not so proud of. Doesn't necessarily have anything to do with the popularity or market success of the product. It's no secret that I regard the Diablo MicroMax as one of my all-time best designs. Still have one a gift from Jim Straight) and won't part with it.

All that is why 20 years later it has a cult following. Why did Jack take it out of production so soon after its release? I could speculate on that, but bottom line is that I don't know. And Jack's no longer around to answer the question himself.
 

Dave J.

New member
D&P-OR said:
Dave-----Same question---why did they take the great Bandito 2 micromax out of production & replace it with the Eldorado!---Mistake IMO.----Rusty Henry himself don't know why they ever did that
Sorry, D&P, that's something I don't know anything about. I did gold machines for Jack for 2 years and some other stuff that never saw the light of day. Wasn't involved with the traditional Jack products and for the most part don't even know what they are.
 

umax

New member
I happened upon the 3x7 Tesoro white coil, 4 pin, first one I have ever seen and now attached to my Diablo UMax, all I have to say is, Oh My Goodness and got rid of the 10 inch beast...Will call Tesoro to find out about sending the detector in and having the coil tuned to the detector...
 

Walknstik

Member
umax said:
I happened upon the 3x7 Tesoro white coil, 4 pin, first one I have ever seen and now attached to my Diablo UMax, all I have to say is, Oh My Goodness and got rid of the 10 inch beast...Will call Tesoro to find out about sending the detector in and having the coil tuned to the detector...

I found my first gold nugget in LSD, Az using that same detector/coil combination :detecting: Gotta love that light-weight design... especially when equipped with that smaller 3" x 7" coil. Also makes a great bench testing detector with that Hot Rock mode testing ore samples for metal versus mineral readings. With the Diablos manual ground balance you shouldn't have to send in detector/coil unless you are having some type of issue? Best of luck to you and HH!
 

umax

New member
Being a new coil for this detector and where the cable screws into the detector is striped. Might as well have a complete check up.
 

Mike D.

New member
If the Tesoro Diablo MicroMax is precursory to the development of the Lobo SuperTrac, where does the older non-surface mount Tesoro Lobo fit into the spectrum of these machines?
Thanks.
Mike D.
 

mascard1

Active member
I have one of those...Hard to find!!!


umax said:
I happened upon the 3x7 Tesoro white coil, 4 pin, first one I have ever seen and now attached to my Diablo UMax, all I have to say is, Oh My Goodness and got rid of the 10 inch beast...Will call Tesoro to find out about sending the detector in and having the coil tuned to the detector...
 
Mike D. said:
If the Tesoro Diablo MicroMax is precursory to the development of the Lobo SuperTrac, where does the older non-surface mount Tesoro Lobo fit into the spectrum of these machines?
Thanks.
Mike D.

The Lobo came before the Lobo ST. Disc mode, but no auto tracking.
 

Dave J.

New member
Old Lobo and Lobo ST are completely different platforms having nothing in common but the name "Lobo" and having been produced by Tesoro.
 

Martinvastik

New member
Call me biased if you like (I designed it), but here's my summary.
Light weight easy to use VLF gold machine, about 18 kHz. Manual ground balancing, if you don't have that skill it's not for you. Basic ability to detect a buried gold nugget comparable to the best 15-20 kHz gold machines nowadays. In light mineralization, it doesn't hit very loud so you'll need to use headphones. It excels (compared to most other VLF's) in noisy ground. No "discrimination", but has a second ground balance knob you can access with a flip of a switch to calm down a suspected hot rock, a feature which is to my knowledge unique to the Diablo MicroMax. The GB2 running at 71 kHz will knock its socks off on the smaller nuggets, but costs more. From the perspective of history and platform evolution, it was the analog circuit proving ground for the Lobo Supertraq.

Cada ingeniero de diseño tiene ciertos productos de los que está orgulloso y de los que no está tan orgulloso. No necesariamente tiene nada que ver con la popularidad o el éxito de mercado del producto. No es ningún secreto que considero al Diablo MicroMax como uno de mis mejores diseños de todos los tiempos. Todavía tengo uno, un regalo de Jim Straight) y no me separaré de él.

Por eso, 20 años después, tiene seguidores de culto. ¿Por qué Jack lo sacó de producción tan pronto después de su lanzamiento? Podría especular sobre eso, pero la conclusión es que no lo sé. Y Jack ya no está para responder la pregunta él mismo.
Hola dave johnson como le va? Un placer he leído mucho sobre los detectores que diseño y me gustaría saber si tiene el pcb layouts de el diabloumax y lista de componentes. Desde ya muchas gracias.saluda atte martin vastik desde Argentina.
 

calibil

Member
Excellent for tot lots, the hot rock toggle can be used as a disc check for unwanted trash vs gold range rings in a very narrow range
 
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