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Wilson R & C II iron mask test that blew my mind!!

Here is the video I did comparing my Wilson machine with several (but not all) of my other machines and I could not believe how it blew all the other ones away. Maybe I'm fooling myself somehow...but you be the judge and let me have it with both barrels!!!!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6FFAYBPfJ-s&feature=youtu.be
 

Hombre

New member
The Wilson R & C test certainly looks legitamate to me, all of my Tesoro detectors would have failed that test with the nail directly on top of the quarter. In my experience, IF I moved the nail off to the side a few inches, I could get a good target response. I have used an old 3
 
I once read of a test someone did where they buried a silver dime down 6" or so and then filled in 4" of dirt and put a staple on top of it. The dime became invisible!!! The lesson here is that the closer to the coil the bad targets are in relation to the good targets the less likely the detector will see the good target.

It would stand to reason than that if you are at a site where all the pre-1900 coins are at 6 inches or more, any iron, foil or pull tabs that are at depths less than 6", there could be a coin hiding under the trash and you will never know it!!!!
 

Hombre

New member
I once found 2 Indian head pennies underneath a halfway buried rusty crown bottle cap. I got a broken signal, picked up the bottle cap and got a smooth signal underneath it, ended up with 2 injuns at 6"deep.
 

vlad

Active member
I can't think of a better detector for this than the Mk-1, its tones and meter can't be beat. The only way to go hunting for the old deep stuff-check every signal.
I remember hunting Pleasant Hill, La. for Civil War Relics with a D-Tex 5.5kHz detector in TR at very low iron. I'd locate in VLF
then switch to TR to check the signals, and hear nothing. So I started digging every deep signal, in VLF [and beyond
the reach of my TR disc circuit.] I started finding .58 caliber mini balls, buttons, and some trash. That depth today would not be
a challenge for even a modestly priced detector. The biggest problem with TR's is ground minerals masking the target. You
have the complete size of the loop seeing ground minerals and pulling the circuit negative, and a very small signal of the target
competing with it trying to pull it positive, giving you a response. This is where the motion circuit gives you added depth & performance, but it has some characteristics that are different you have to account for. Example, the bottlecap is easily handled by TR's, but can give some motion circuits fits.
Iron can mask, but not always. With my CZ, if I set it to iron reject, I'm guaranteed to get false signals from iron in the coin notches-yet if I accept
iron its identified correctly, and I can hear conductive targets mixed in. Any detector I use is set at "0" discriminate, and depending on
size/shape, I dig the targets that read iron and good both-a surprising number turn out to be coins. Here's a little added treat for you; iron makes
a coils field stronger and you may have in instances where it can add depth to your detector. There are simply too many times when you apply
all the logic and still can't figure out why you found something under very adverse conditions. But the opposite-you won't know and be able to
compare-you missed it.
As Ty Brook has always said, if you aren't digging trash you are leaving some treasure behind.
 
vlad said:
I can't think of a better detector for this than the Mk-1, its tones and meter can't be beat. The only way to go hunting for the old deep stuff-check every signal.
I remember hunting Pleasant Hill, La. for Civil War Relics with a D-Tex 5.5kHz detector in TR at very low iron. I'd locate in VLF
then switch to TR to check the signals, and hear nothing. So I started digging every deep signal, in VLF [and beyond
the reach of my TR disc circuit.] I started finding .58 caliber mini balls, buttons, and some trash. That depth today would not be
a challenge for even a modestly priced detector. The biggest problem with TR's is ground minerals masking the target. You
have the complete size of the loop seeing ground minerals and pulling the circuit negative, and a very small signal of the target
competing with it trying to pull it positive, giving you a response. This is where the motion circuit gives you added depth & performance, but it has some characteristics that are different you have to account for. Example, the bottlecap is easily handled by TR's, but can give some motion circuits fits.
Iron can mask, but not always. With my CZ, if I set it to iron reject, I'm guaranteed to get false signals from iron in the coin notches-yet if I accept
iron its identified correctly, and I can hear conductive targets mixed in. Any detector I use is set at "0" discriminate, and depending on
size/shape, I dig the targets that read iron and good both-a surprising number turn out to be coins. Here's a little added treat for you; iron makes
a coils field stronger and you may have in instances where it can add depth to your detector. There are simply too many times when you apply
all the logic and still can't figure out why you found something under very adverse conditions. But the opposite-you won't know and be able to
compare-you missed it.
As Ty Brook has always said, if you aren't digging trash you are leaving some treasure behind.

That's some really good advice Vlad! I have often wanted to drum up the courage and the patience to start digging some of those deep targets that are just too deep to give a disc reading. No one I hunt with does this technique, so I have no one to mentor with on this approach.

There is a battle site from War of 1812 era that I hunt sometimes and I have dug very deep musket balls that have just given a hint of something more conductive than iron and I have been surprised when it is a musket ball. Never tried this in some old parks I hunt that I know must have old gold coins in them, but which must be down so deep now that all-metal is about the best you can do to get a signal.

The Mark-1 I have could not duplicate the feat my Wilson was able to do with the nail and silver coin!!
 

vlad

Active member
you will need to vary the angles you cross the target at, and the speed-and won't get a continuous signal like the Wilson. Now this is another thing that seems wrong,
but I've found works the opposite of what people think. Go to a bigger loop. I get more coins in iron with the 10" wafer than the 7.5" loop on the Mk-1.
Same with the Compass X-100, the 16" loop is about the best iron worker in a motion detector I've ever used.
But the logic is backward from conventional, and these are concentrics. Maybe an engineer can explain the effect, I can't, I just know from experience it works. Recovery speed
definitely has something to do with motion units. Check Monte's nail & board-coin video test, he gets good hits on a coin among 4 nails.
Try hunting the actual areas you mentioned-might be surprised.
 

tonopahkid

New member
Interesting test my minelad musky with the 7 inch coil passes this test very well I was surorised and I was surprised at what didn't thanks.
 

earthlypotluck

Well-known member
That was an amazing "nail test" eye opener. Thanks for producing the video - Jim
 

Tallon

New member
And don't forget that if a coin is very deep (and) underneath trash, this coin could, and often is hidden forever too.
 
I have set up several real-world scenarios in a test garden in my backyard with nails and coins mixed together at different depths, etc. Some of my detectors get nothing. Others get signals one direction and others get signals sporadically in all directions. The Wilson RC II and my Fisher 1265 seem to do better, but so does my old Teknetics Mark 1...surprisingly well actually! The moral of the story...IF YOU DO NOT WANT TO MISS ANY OLD COINS THAT SOMEONE ELSE HAS MISSED YOU HAVE TO DIG ANY SIGNAL ABOVE IRON ANY DIRECTION YOU GET IT, BECAUSE THERE COULD BE A COIN THERE SNEAKING THROUGH THE TRASH ABOVE IT!
 

Dan-Pa.

New member
Had one years ago and sure a deepie that even worked well on saltsand beach...The problem is the coil failed with some and they haven't been made in years...
 

woodchiphustler

New member
I have owned ever Relic and Coin and a favorite the ATD. Does not surprise me at all. Paul was a genius.
 
Hey Harold. See if yours is able to do this? Put a copper penny on the ground and hold the coil about 4 or 5 inches above it. Now see if you can hold the unit still enough so it does not beep? I can't on mine. It is like the darn thing works like a non-motion machine and a motion machine at the same time!
 

HaroldILL.

New member
I can't when it is rite in the middle of the target it keeps beebing on and off. Does yours also have the circuit overload problem as I wonder if all are like that? Is this why you moved the one adjustable pot? Thanks.
 
The adjustable pot I'm pretty sure is for ground balance. I usually run it as high counter-clockwise as I can before it starts to chatter too much. I do find that I get better depth if I set this pot just right for the ground conditions where I am running the machine.

If you suspect overload then try it with the machine laying flat on a table with the coil far away from anything and holding the coin in front of the coil. I haven't tried mine this way, but I will tomorrow.
 
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