Find's Treasure Forums

Welcome to Find's Treasure Forums, Guests!

You are viewing this forums as a guest which limits you to read only status.

Only registered members may post stories, questions, classifieds, reply to other posts, contact other members using built in messaging and use many other features found on these forums.

Why not register and join us today? It's free! (We don't share your email addresses with anyone.) We keep email addresses of our users to protect them and others from bad people posting things they shouldn't.

Click here to register!



Need Support Help?

Cannot log in?, click here to have new password emailed to you

Changed email? Forgot to update your account with new email address? Need assistance with something else?, click here to go to Find's Support Form and fill out the form.

💰💰💰 This could cost you $200,000 💰💰💰

ManInTheWall

Active member
If you cut a Fuel oil line going to a house, and EPA mandates it's hazardous and needs cleaned up.

Building a deck? Planting a tree? Installing a mailbox? Then 811 is the number you should call. Every digging job requires a call – even small projects like planting trees or shrubs. If you hit an underground utility line while digging, you can harm yourself or those around you, disrupt service to an entire neighborhood and potentially be responsible for fines and repair costs.

Many states have a CALL BEFORE YoU Dig law.....

Some penalties are.....
civil penalty up to a maximum of ten thousand dollars ($10,000.00) in Indiana
California State Law Says, You Must Contact DigAlert Before You Dig! Failure to do so can result in fines up to fifty thousand dollars

some states say you must call for anything over 12" deep, others don't stipulate a depth.
 

D&P-OR

Well-known member
If you cut a Fuel oil line going to a house, and EPA mandates it's hazardous and needs cleaned up.

Building a deck? Planting a tree? Installing a mailbox? Then 811 is the number you should call. Every digging job requires a call – even small projects like planting trees or shrubs. If you hit an underground utility line while digging, you can harm yourself or those around you, disrupt service to an entire neighborhood and potentially be responsible for fines and repair costs.

Many states have a CALL BEFORE YoU Dig law.....

Some penalties are.....
civil penalty up to a maximum of ten thousand dollars ($10,000.00) in Indiana
California State Law Says, You Must Contact DigAlert Before You Dig! Failure to do so can result in fines up to fifty thousand dollars

some states say you must call for anything over 12" deep, others don't stipulate a depth.
You sound like ONE PARANOID PERSON that's trying to stir up trouble on this forum!----Chill out!----Did you miss your meds today???
 

ManInTheWall

Active member
You sound like ONE PARANOID PERSON that's trying to stir up trouble on this forum!----Chill out!----Did you miss your meds today???
Paranoid?

I've talked to people who have hit small fuel lines , fuel oil lines going from a tank outside into a house, putting a grounding rod in. $200,000 or so EPA clean up fee.

I know another gentleman, who bumped a main valve of a waterline, he was looking at $100,000 for the damage for a hospital not having water.

Please no Ad Hominem attacks, thanks!
 

IDXMonster

Well-known member
It does seem that there is more typing than detecting….Man in the Wall, let’s see some of those coins you find this weekend! Get out and METAL DETECT. That’s what this forum is here for. Enjoy the great outdoors and report back how you did!👍
 

Ronstar

Well-known member
You forgot to mention that utilities by law have to be buried to a depth of no less than 18” IN MOST STATES. If someone hits a shallow line installed by a home owner or other non professional then liability reverts back and the utilities companies with service jurisdiction can declare it illegal and tag it unsafe. Pushing a standard metal detector to get it to 18” plus…..
 

ManInTheWall

Active member
You forgot to mention that utilities by law have to be buried to a depth of no less than 18” IN MOST STATES. If someone hits a shallow line installed by a home owner or other non professional then liability reverts back and the utilities companies with service jurisdiction can declare it illegal and tag it unsafe. Pushing a standard metal detector to get it to 18” plus…..

These are from 3 separate utility websites. As far as liability? My experience is... any injured party will sue everyone, and it will be up to me to defend myself no matter how frivilioous it is. Utilities have a lot of political power in most states, my guess is, the odds are in their favor, as to how the laws are written, interpreted.

There are NO standard depths for buried utility lines. Due to such forces as grading, excavation and years of erosion, there is no way to determine depth without physically exposing the lines.

Utility lines need to be marked accurately, because, even when digging only a few inches deep, the risk of striking an underground utility line still exists. Visit www.dominionenergy.com/dig for information about 811 and the call-before-you-dig process. For additional natural gas safety information, visit www.safegasohio.org

The risk can lurk just inches below the surface. How deep the utility lines are buried can change due to erosion, previous digging and uneven terrain.
 

Doubletap

Member
I thought I hit a natural spring one day in the back yard digging next to the fence. It ended up being a rental homes Sprinkler line that somehow was installed before the fence was put up. Since we had so much problems with different renters over the yrs, I didn’t say nothing.
Instead , I tapped into it with a tee fitting and line to my garden. Every time they watered there yard my garden also got watered.

So sometimes it’s not bad to hit something while digging.
 

SeabeeRon

Well-known member
I thought I hit a natural spring one day in the back yard digging next to the fence. It ended up being a rental homes Sprinkler line that somehow was installed before the fence was put up. Since we had so much problems with different renters over the yrs, I didn’t say nothing.
Instead , I tapped into it with a tee fitting and line to my garden. Every time they watered there yard my garden also got watered.

So sometimes it’s not bad to hit something while digging.
Perfect!
 

ManInTheWall

Active member
I thought I hit a natural spring one day in the back yard digging next to the fence. It ended up being a rental homes Sprinkler line that somehow was installed before the fence was put up. Since we had so much problems with different renters over the yrs, I didn’t say nothing.
Instead , I tapped into it with a tee fitting and line to my garden. Every time they watered there yard my garden also got watered.

So sometimes it’s not bad to hit something while digging.
Thats theft of services. That home is owned by someone probably just trying to make a living, the landlord. That could be costing him big bucks in extra water bill. If it was Walmarts waterline, I really would not have a qaum with that. But you may be costing some private individual... $100's of $.
 

Doubletap

Member
Thats theft of services. That home is owned by someone probably just trying to make a living, the landlord. That could be costing him big bucks in extra water bill. If it was Walmarts waterline, I really would not have a qaum with that. But you may be costing some private individual... $100's of $.
LOl. The landlord never did anything about his noise making renters with my phone calls to him. That prompted my irrigation invention.
The next yr. I planted some corn, corn needs water, lots of it, which I had.
 

ManInTheWall

Active member
LOl. The landlord never did anything about his noise making renters with my phone calls to him. That prompted my irrigation invention.
The next yr. I planted some corn, corn needs water, lots of it, which I had.
The landlord are not his children. He's not law enforcement. He can't play "cop". He can't falsely accuse someone of a crime without proof. He definately has no judicial powers to issue a penalty or punishment for any accusations.

Theft of services is a felony. Not only that... you are stealing from a private person, not some big mega corporation. If it was the government, or some company making multi millions, ehh no big deal. But you are stealing a noticeable percentage of this individuals income. Go rip off someone who can afford to be ripped off, not a little person.
 

Doubletap

Member
The landlord are not his children. He's not law enforcement. He can't play "cop". He can't falsely accuse someone of a crime without proof. He definately has no judicial powers to issue a penalty or punishment for any accusations.

Theft of services is a felony. Not only that... you are stealing from a private person, not some big mega corporation. If it was the government, or some company making multi millions, ehh no big deal. But you are stealing a noticeable percentage of this individuals income. Go rip off someone who can afford to be ripped off, not a little person.

Your mentality is like that of the adjacent landlord, clueless. Ostrich with its head in a hole. Your post are nothing but ( I’m board , let’s get in a dispute on the forum )
 

Missouri -- Ma Betty

Well-known member
The landlord are not his children. He's not law enforcement. He can't play "cop". He can't falsely accuse someone of a crime without proof. He definately has no judicial powers to issue a penalty or punishment for any accusations.

Theft of services is a felony. Not only that... you are stealing from a private person, not some big mega corporation. If it was the government, or some company making multi millions, ehh no big deal. But you are stealing a noticeable percentage of this individuals income. Go rip off someone who can afford to be ripped off, not a little person.

Both are the same as stealing (like Taxing the Rich because they have more by their own hard works or by others hired by them) Neither is righteous in God Jehovah's sight--& suffer the thief will whether now or on God's Judgement Day! When we do wrong according to God's Holy Word & in in His Sight we will not escape punishment for the CRIME done but won't be penalized for it (them) by having true Repentance & Believing faith in Jesus before we draw our Last Breath & our Living Soul departs from our Fleshes' temporary body--they who are saved in Jesus will receive a Glorified Body on The Faithful Saints Resurrection Day like Jesus on His Resurrection Day standing upon clouds as He left Earth & entered His Eternal Kingdom where we will live with Him forevermore! Glory hallelujah!--Praise !His Holy Name., JESUS! Amen! Ma
 

ManInTheWall

Active member
Your mentality is like that of the adjacent landlord, clueless. Ostrich with its head in a hole. Your post are nothing but ( I’m board , let’s get in a dispute on the forum )

I here to be happy and friendly.. not looking to "dispute". I've worked hard during my life, sometimes 20 hours a day, missing meals, not even having time to go to the bathroom. Working every day of the year, including Christmas. I also have friends who work their butts off with rental properties. They are not rich, there is a lot of $ to take care of a property, meet government regulations, etc.

Usually noise complaints can lead to police/legal fines and landlords can often use violations of law on their property as a basis to evict. So, unless there is prior violations issued by law enforcement, what's loud and what isn't, is subjective. And, as a private citizen, the landlord is not granted qualified immunity if he makes a mistake in what is or isn't loud.

You can also go talk to the neighbor. This would probably be the most effective avenue.

I guess everyone needs something to complain about. I personally have more important things to worry about, than loud neighbors. Then again... I bought all my neighbors houses so I would not have to deal with anything!
 

MidTN

Well-known member
I thought I hit a natural spring one day in the back yard digging next to the fence. It ended up being a rental homes Sprinkler line that somehow was installed before the fence was put up. Since we had so much problems with different renters over the yrs, I didn’t say nothing.
Instead , I tapped into it with a tee fitting and line to my garden. Every time they watered there yard my garden also got watered.

So sometimes it’s not bad to hit something while digging.
When I worked for the City of Nashville we found people that would steal water they were more likely to steal electricity. One time we found a house using jumper cables to steal electricity from their neighbors electric meter box.
 

ManInTheWall

Active member
When I worked for the City of Nashville we found people that would steal water they were more likely to steal electricity. One time we found a house using jumper cables to steal electricity from their neighbors electric meter box.
Did they prosecute them?
 

hawgdawg

Well-known member
If you cut a Fuel oil line going to a house, and EPA mandates it's hazardous and needs cleaned up.

Building a deck? Planting a tree? Installing a mailbox? Then 811 is the number you should call. Every digging job requires a call – even small projects like planting trees or shrubs. If you hit an underground utility line while digging, you can harm yourself or those around you, disrupt service to an entire neighborhood and potentially be responsible for fines and repair costs.

Many states have a CALL BEFORE YoU Dig law.....

Some penalties are.....
civil penalty up to a maximum of ten thousand dollars ($10,000.00) in Indiana
California State Law Says, You Must Contact DigAlert Before You Dig! Failure to do so can result in fines up to fifty thousand dollars

some states say you must call for anything over 12" deep, others don't stipulate a depth.
I didn't read everyone's posts about this subject . But around here 811 will not mark a fuel line as its not public utilities,,, all fuel oil going an individuals house is owners responsibility,,, you have to call an outside company that marks homeowners personal fuel lines ,, landscape lighting,,, etc .
 

BobOso

Well-known member
code here is 36 inches for water, 48 inches for electric. I know where all my lines are (I dug them) but if someone were to ever buy my property I doubt if they would did a hole 36 inches seep for a tree.
 
Top