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Brass Railroad Identification Tag

Sataro

Active member
Went out hunting this afternoon with my hunting partner. He found two wheats to my one. But that was okay. I also found an old cosmetics case which will need some cleaning up. My best find was an old watch fob or so I thought. Upon doing a little research, I realized I had found an old railroad baggage tag. This tag has the name Interurban on it which is an old railroad branch that ran from Corsicana to Dallas between 1913 to 1941. 25-30 years ago, my hunting partner Jerry found an old railroad token from this same railroad.
 

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chuck ky

Active member
Went out hunting this afternoon with my hunting partner. He found two wheats to my one. But that was okay. I also found an old cosmetics case which will need some cleaning up. My best find was an old watch fob or so I thought. Upon doing a little research, I realized I had found an old railroad baggage tag. This tag has the name Interurban on it which is an old railroad branch that ran from Corsicana to Dallas between 1913 to 1941. 25-30 years ago, my hunting partner Jerry found an old railroad token from this same railroad.
That looks like a baggage tag but with the name of a liquor house and a street address I'm wondering if it might be something else. You need to research it, its a great find whatever it turns out to be.
 

E-Trac-Ohio

Well-known member
Nice looking Tag - congrats !
 

Sataro

Active member
That looks like a baggage tag but with the name of a liquor house and a street address I'm wondering if it might be something else. You need to research it, its a great find whatever it turns out to be.
Thanks. Research reveals it is
That looks like a baggage tag but with the name of a liquor house and a street address I'm wondering if it might be something else. You need to research it, its a great find whatever it turns out to be.
This is what I came up with on the research:
Antique Railroad Baggage Tag
Instead of the paper tags used at airports today, Railroads in their early days used brass tags to keep track of luggage. One tag would be affixed to the bag and put into storage on the train, while the other tag would be given to the owner who could trade it in for their bag at the destination. Tags typically included the name of the railroad, an ID number, sometimes the name of the destination, or the company who produced the tag. Antique railroad baggage tags come in many different shapes, and have long slots on them for the leather straps that would attach them to the baggage.)
Further research revealed the S stood for Solomon. Solomon Jacobs owned 4 saloons in Dallas. The saloon on 514 Commerce st, Dallas, TX was operated from 1915-1917. After that the saloon became The Hudson Cafeteria. The Interurban Railroad running between Dallas & Corsicana started up in 1913. 95 saloon licenses was issued & approved by state authorities during this time frame. This information was documented by early copies of the Dallas Morning Newspaper. Thanks to a Corsicana historian for providing this research.
 

Blind Squirrel

Active member
Howdy Sataro--
I love that tag. I'd rather dig something like that than a Walking Liberty Half, and I love digging Walking Liberty's ! Excelent research on that tag too. I enjoyed reading it. Best of luck and...
Happy Hunting!
Blind Squirrel
 

chuck ky

Active member
Thanks. Research reveals it is

This is what I came up with on the research:
Antique Railroad Baggage Tag
Instead of the paper tags used at airports today, Railroads in their early days used brass tags to keep track of luggage. One tag would be affixed to the bag and put into storage on the train, while the other tag would be given to the owner who could trade it in for their bag at the destination. Tags typically included the name of the railroad, an ID number, sometimes the name of the destination, or the company who produced the tag. Antique railroad baggage tags come in many different shapes, and have long slots on them for the leather straps that would attach them to the baggage.)
Further research revealed the S stood for Solomon. Solomon Jacobs owned 4 saloons in Dallas. The saloon on 514 Commerce st, Dallas, TX was operated from 1915-1917. After that the saloon became The Hudson Cafeteria. The Interurban Railroad running between Dallas & Corsicana started up in 1913. 95 saloon licenses was issued & approved by state authorities during this time frame. This information was documented by early copies of the Dallas Morning Newspaper. Thanks to a Corsicana historian for provid
 

chuck ky

Active member
After I posted that reply I got to thinking, the tag would have to have a way for the shipper to identify who was to receive the package
 
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LawrencetheMDer

Active member
Great find. When I first saw the title, it reminded me of railroad date spikes (to date railroad ties), I use to "collect" back in the 60s. In fact, I think I still have them...somewhere. About 3/8" wide x 2 1/2" long, the date was on the head. Thanks for the memory.
 

Sataro

Active member
Great find. When I first saw the title, it reminded me of railroad date spikes (to date railroad ties), I use to "collect" back in the 60s. In fact, I think I still have them...somewhere. About 3/8" wide x 2 1/2" long, the date was on the head. Thanks for the memory.
Yes I’m sitting here at work & looking at a couple of the railroad nails you are talking about. I work part time in a small railroad museum.
 
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