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CTX questions about ground condition, "good" signals, etc.

mjax

New member
Hello,

I've been hunting the past week on some fairly saturated ground (lots of rain here). I was noticing that probably 99% of the time when I received a good signal (using Target Trace) that the display was also showing iron in the bottom right corner. I likely passed up some coins thinking it was alloyed junk. Anyway, I tried this on my test site at home, and the same thing happened. In spots where I know there's nothing but a coin, I was still getting the good signal/visual, using Target Trace, along with a red diamond with blue traces in the bottom right of the screen. I do not recall this happening until recently. Could it possibly be the amount of moisture/water in the ground? I suppose I should just ignore the iron reading and pay attention to the good signal. I have made some tweaks recently to open the machine up (more volume gain and less discrimination). Does anyone have recommendations about the best conditions? I thought that some moisture was good (obviously for digging, but also for signals), but maybe extremely wet ground is problematic.

Two other questions:
1) If the target jumps around a good bit on the display (but stays in a good range) do you normally dig or is it a given that it's junk?
2) Is the two-way repeatable signal a rule of thumb or should one dig a solid one-way signal (provided it falls in the accepted range)?

Thanks for all responses/help!
Mark
 

sube

Well-known member
The iron bin in the corner displaying iron is quit common it's the ground signal wetter ground the more solid the iron bin well be . Hold a coin in front of the coil and wave it back and forth air test no ground involved now the iron bin is empty .
So the wetter the ground the more iron will show in the bin.
Two other ? Jumpy signals as long as they repeat and pinpoint in the same location the sound is coming from dig.
? 2 just look at ? 1.
As far as running disc i don't any target you have disc out if a coin is near well also be disc foil nail or pull-tab you create a null which hides that audio from the target you seek . sube
 

jkline

Active member
If you aren't sure, just dig. Eventually you will understand what your machine is telling you.

Normally I only dig if I get a repeat on both swings, but I have seen a guy on youtube pick up silver on swings that only beep one way. He said that normally he ignores targets that don't register both ways, but in the particular spot he was in, it was worth digging all the iffies.
 

IDXMonster

Well-known member
Here’s an example of what a fairly small piece of an iron nail can do to even a big coin. Go to 7:45 in the video. It takes a little while for me to get to it as I have a pinched nerve in my back but the result and how it was reacting in the first place might help you with what to listen for. Notice how it hits pretty well from one SIDE, but keeps doing the SAME THING from that angle.
 

BigTony

Well-known member
Here’s an example of what a fairly small piece of an iron nail can do to even a big coin. Go to 7:45 in the video. It takes a little while for me to get to it as I have a pinched nerve in my back but the result and how it was reacting in the first place might help you with what to listen for. Notice how it hits pretty well from one SIDE, but keeps doing the SAME THING from that angle.
Sorry to hear about your back, do some stretches before and after detecting to get you through.
Great video, keep that up and you’ll make more folks get a CTX!
Tony
 

IDXMonster

Well-known member
Sorry to hear about your back, do some stretches before and after detecting to get you through.
Great video, keep that up and you’ll make more folks get a CTX!
Tony
I and two other guys I hunt with repetitively pull 100+ silvers out of public places every year Tony. Yes, I have a full time job, family, elderly parents who need help....so it’s not like I’m out every day all day. 10 hours a week would be about right. I literally don’t have the TIME to be digging targets that I don’t think have good odds of being what I want...a silver (or at least old) coin. For that to happen, I firstly have to have a machine that increases those odds. And then I have to know it VERY well. It’s all within reach for anyone, if they want to afford it and put in the time. BTW...CTX’s don’t cost 2500$. They cost 1800-1900$. I bought mine brand new for 1800$ plus tax in 2016.
Don’t get me wrong, the Explorer is UNREAL. But the CTX just ramps that up in a way that dials in ID even better. The “Combined” mode is the biggest functional difference between the CTX and an eTrac. If you know any one of the three machines mentioned in this paragraph like the back of your hand, you’ll do well...but you have to be in an OLDER public place.
 

BigTony

Well-known member
I and two other guys I hunt with repetitively pull 100+ silvers out of public places every year Tony. Yes, I have a full time job, family, elderly parents who need help....so it’s not like I’m out every day all day. 10 hours a week would be about right. I literally don’t have the TIME to be digging targets that I don’t think have good odds of being what I want...a silver (or at least old) coin. For that to happen, I firstly have to have a machine that increases those odds. And then I have to know it VERY well. It’s all within reach for anyone, if they want to afford it and put in the time. BTW...CTX’s don’t cost 2500$. They cost 1800-1900$. I bought mine brand new for 1800$ plus tax in 2016.
Don’t get me wrong, the Explorer is UNREAL. But the CTX just ramps that up in a way that dials in ID even better. The “Combined” mode is the biggest functional difference between the CTX and an eTrac. If you know any one of the three machines mentioned in this paragraph like the back of your hand, you’ll do well...but you have to be in an OLDER public place.
I really don’t know why I baulked on getting the CTX. I saw it at the preview in Atlantic City and enjoyed the balance of it.
On the other hand I don’t travel much as I did in years past. Lost two good partners and the third hasn’t developed, very crazy hobby indeed.
Thinking about your post - many folks use the Nox here due to light weight but maybe the CTX is the edge I need.
Thanks for the write up encouragement
 
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IDXMonster

Well-known member
If you can swing it...literally and figuratively...it ALLOWS you to get away with a lot of things. It has given me the ability to find many good finds WITHOUT having to go toward a “dig it all” mentality. Results over time are my gauge. If someone else is doing better with another machine, THAT is the one they should use. Not everyone is the same, not all conditions or targets sought are the same. The trick is to do what works in your own situation.
Put it this way. If I go out for a 4-5 hour hunt and do NOT find at least two silver items...I consider that a piss poor day. A three silver item day is about right. ALL public ground. This is what the expectation has come to be.
 

mjax

New member
Here’s an example of what a fairly small piece of an iron nail can do to even a big coin. Go to 7:45 in the video. It takes a little while for me to get to it as I have a pinched nerve in my back but the result and how it was reacting in the first place might help you with what to listen for. Notice how it hits pretty well from one SIDE, but keeps doing the SAME THING from that angle.
Thanks for the video. Do you you always hunt with the larger coil for depth? I suppose the added weight is worth the trouble...any idea how much more depth it gives you?
 

IDXMonster

Well-known member
Thanks for the video. Do you you always hunt with the larger coil for depth? I suppose the added weight is worth the trouble...any idea how much more depth it gives you?
Yes MJ, I use it 95% of the time...roughly. The reason is because I hunt huge places and it allows coverage, and I’d estimate the depth gain is 1-2”, depending. The trick for a newer user is to run in Auto+3 ALL of the time for stability. A wild machine that is incoherent to the user is of absolutely NO use, you have to be able to understand the audio. While the stock coil MIGHT pick up these ultra deep targets, it would have to be in manual Sensitivity at a pretty high level...perhaps so high that it would chatter all the time. I’m looking for deep weak signals. If I have the Sensitivity jacked all the time, I’ll never pick out that weak signal through the chatter. The extra large field that the huge coil produces gets DEEP with STABILITY.
On a side note...I ALWAYS have the Volume Gain at maximum. This makes the very deep signals easier to pick out in the audio. Once you get a signal, go back and play with it. Make sure it REPEATS and STAYS IN ONE SPOT. If a high “blip” seems to move around as you’re sweeping it, it is NOT a coin.
 

IDXMonster

Well-known member
Isnt that the 13" coil and do you use a harness? 4 hrs a long hunt with that size.
It can be a long hunt LT, but if you’re digging targets every 5-10 minutes it’s not bad. You’d have to look up the specs but I think the difference between it and the stick coil is less than an ounce. But don’t quote me on that...🙂
 
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