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I enjoy shooting when I can go

Old Longhair

Crazy Ol' Foole
Staff member
I prefer the 16" version...;) it is my "long range" rifle...
eh15sgr.jpg
In that case, I've still got you covered. My original AR-180 should be right up your ally.

AR-180_02.JPG
 

Draco

Well-known member
I see some differences with the AR 15 M16. I did not know this rifle.
 

Wild Willy

Well-known member
How much elevation is needed for a 1000 yd. shot from an original Sharps? Seems the bullet would have to hit on top of the head for a kill. Heck, I couldn't even see a man at 1000 yds unless he was waving a big red flag.
 

JC99328

Active member
The arc peaks about 45 ft above the line of sight on a 1000 yds shot with a black powder rifle. If the sun is behind you, you can actually see the bullet and watch it go into the target and splat (steel gong target). This is with a telescope, 2.5 second flight time, roughly 1250 fps.
 

JC99328

Active member
Don't underestimate the power of a 45 cal Sharps. It will go through 2 buffalo standing side by side (500 grn Gov round nose bullet). I never have recovered a bullet from an animal.

It will go through 4" of oak at a mile (late 1800s US Gov Sandy Hook testing)
 

Draco

Well-known member
I know it is not the best gauge for those extreme distances, but it is a gauge that I like for its versatility.
I am amazed at the smoothness of the action of that rifle. 3000 yards is too much!! :eek:

 

Picketwire

Well-known member
You guys are making me drool all over myself! At Adobe Wells, Texas there is a documented evidence that a buffalo hunter with a 50-70 hit and killed a commander of the enemy at over 1400 yards. I saw an article where people that said it wouldn't go that far and so they tested using military tracking on a similar bullet from a similar black powder load. If I remember right it stayed in the air 31 seconds when shot at its optimum angle. I don't remember the range that it traveled but the time astounded me. That's a big old hunk of lead. I'd say it would be lethal for quite a bit farther than 2.5 seconds out.
The last two times I went deer hunting I took my dad's old 30-30 and his old Winchester model 1895 30-40 Krag. Oh, one more thing, I tried using a load of 100 grains black powder equivalent load of Pyrodex and a Lee cast minnie ball (approx 500 grains) in my lightweight muzzleloader and it told me "sir, that's why the military used 70 grains!"
 

Picketwire

Well-known member
I found an article (Long Shot: Buffalo Hunters vs. Quanah Parker's Warrior) in April 2021 True West Magazine on Adobe Walls where Mike Venturino tested if the shot was possible (It was with 4 ½ degrees elevation) and that a similar load could go go 3600 yards. The actual shot was 1538 yards.
 

Old Longhair

Crazy Ol' Foole
Staff member
<snip> The last two times I went deer hunting I took my dad's old 30-30 and his old Winchester model 1895 30-40 Krag. <snip>
The very first deer I ever shot was with my Kraig (variant carbine).

51D6n6g.jpg
 

Draco

Well-known member
The winchester wood needs to be hydrated. ;)
Danish oil, for the winchester cylinder head.
But I prefer to prepare my own oil:
70% linseed oil
30% natural turpentine essence (not synthetic)

Test first on a piece of wood and if you like it, you can apply to the butt of the winchester

It's a joke, but it's what I use
 

Old Longhair

Crazy Ol' Foole
Staff member
The winchester wood needs to be hydrated. ;)
Danish oil, for the winchester cylinder head.
But I prefer to prepare my own oil:
70% linseed oil
30% natural turpentine essence (not synthetic)

Test first on a piece of wood and if you like it, you can apply to the butt of the winchester

It's a joke, but it's what I use
That gun isn't supposed to have a lustrous finish. Shiny guns are pretty, but not always practical for hunting weapons. :thumbup:
 
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