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I may have just cracked rhe "mystery" of the Xterra Pro on the beach....

BootyHunter

Active member
Look at this "safety brochure" packed in with a brand new Minelab detector I just received. Look at the frequencies used on the different machine. Look at the Go-find, a single frequency machine, has a very narrow range, look at the Equinox, Vanquish, CTX 2 Multi-iq and an FBS machine, now look at the Xterra Pro. Hmmm, seems ML can baffle us with "8khz" BS, but they can't lie to the Fcc. #Busted
 

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The frequencies listed don’t necessarily eminate from the coil. Can be from the electronics. I don’t understand your point.
You dont understand the point? Look at the Go-find, an "actual" single frequency detector and look at the range of frequencies listed, now look at the Xterra Pro. It has an almost identical range to the Equonox and Vanquish, both detectors using Multi-iq. Why such a large range on a single frequency machine, THATS THE POINT.
 
You dont understand the point? Look at the Go-find, an "actual" single frequency detector and look at the range of frequencies listed, now look at the Xterra Pro. It has an almost identical range to the Equonox and Vanquish, both detectors using Multi-iq. Why such a large range on a single frequency machine, THATS THE POINT.
The range of frequencies of the old 705 single frequency machine was even wider, though it required coil changes to change frequency. So, the range of frequencies by itself is irrelevant in the world of all digital detectors.
 
The range of frequencies of the old 705 single frequency machine was even wider, though it required coil changes to change frequency. So, the range of frequencies by itself is irrelevant in the world of all digital detectors.
Show me that documentation then and I will believe it. Funny that the single frequency go find has a very narrow range of frequencies. But show me some printed literature from Minelab backing up what you "say".
 
Show me that documentation then and I will believe it. Funny that the single frequency go find has a very narrow range of frequencies. But show me some printed literature from Minelab backing up what you "say".
I really don't care if you don't believe me.
Operating frequencies of the 705 are well known to be from 3kHz to 18.75kHz.
 
You dont understand the point? Look at the Go-find, an "actual" single frequency detector and look at the range of frequencies listed, now look at the Xterra Pro. It has an almost identical range to the Equonox and Vanquish, both detectors using Multi-iq. Why such a large range on a single frequency machine, THATS THE POINT.
It could be because the gofind has simpler circuitry that does not utilize a higher frequency microcontroller. It could be more of an analog machine, a hybrid, for example. The frequencies depicted do not tell the full story. For example the frequencies shown for the GPZ don’t tell you that the circuitry used is far more complicated than the other detectors with similar frequencies. These frequencies are strictly radiated (not just from the coil) that show in FCC scans. You can make a single frequency detector using analog or digital circuitry. Probably digital has become cheaper and results in a more consistently manufacturable design that can be tweaked with later code changes if necessary. With the XP, its circuitry could very well be very similar to the EQ’s but have a much lower board cost due to performance increases and added embedded features in the processor. . It is designed for higher volume and lower cost yet good performance.
 
It could be because the gofind has simpler circuitry that does not utilize a higher frequency microcontroller. It could be more of an analog machine, a hybrid, for example. The frequencies depicted do not tell the full story. For example the frequencies shown for the GPZ don’t tell you that the circuitry used is far more complicated than the other detectors with similar frequencies. These frequencies are strictly radiated (not just from the coil) that show in FCC scans. You can make a single frequency detector using analog or digital circuitry. Probably digital has become cheaper and results in a more consistently manufacturable design that can be tweaked with later code changes if necessary. With the XP, its circuitry could very well be very similar to the EQ’s but have a much lower board cost due to performance increases and added embedded features in the processor. . It is designed for higher volume and lower cost yet good performance.
All that "word salad" still doesn't explain why on a known single frequency detector from Minelab the range is very very narrow, like 1 khz, but on alllll the Fbs and Multi-iq and Pi machines its very similar to the Xterra Pro. Y'all are trying to "explain" away what is very obvious.
 
I really don't care if you don't believe me.
Operating frequencies of the 705 are well known to be from 3kHz to 18.75kHz.
Yeah 3-18khz. About 15 khz. NOT 3-143 like the Multi-iq AND Xterra Pro show.
 
Yeah 3-18khz. About 15 khz. NOT 3-143 like the Multi-iq AND Xterra Pro show.
There's a big difference between licensed frequencies and actual operational frequencies.
Show me scope data that proves that any of those machines are operating over 100kHz.
 
All that "word salad" still doesn't explain why on a known single frequency detector from Minelab the range is very very narrow, like 1 khz, but on alllll the Fbs and Multi-iq and Pi machines its very similar to the Xterra Pro. Y'all are trying to "explain" away what is very obvious.
They could for example come up with a detector that bursts white noise but the DSP RX circuitry optimizes on one frequency for the eddy current response. The frequency could be optimized for terrain mineral content or water salt content. They could call it a single frequency detector… I think it’s time to stop thinking all detectors are like the old school ones.
I still don’t get your point though. You think ML is lying and it’s not a single frequency detector? So you don’t like a multifreq for $279 that works well? Technology is going to a place where companies will just say what the detector can do and not attempt to describe technically how it does it.
 
They could for example come up with a detector that bursts white noise but the DSP RX circuitry optimizes on one frequency for the eddy current response. The frequency could be optimized for terrain mineral content or water salt content. They could call it a single frequency detector… I think it’s time to stop thinking all detectors are like the old school ones.
I still don’t get your point though. You think ML is lying and it’s not a single frequency detector? So you don’t like a multifreq for $279 that works well? Technology is going to a place where companies will just say what the detector can do and not attempt to describe technically how it does it.
I think the Xterra Pro is an amazing machine at an astronomical value. I do not believe the secret to its success is simply using 8khz, and I dont like to be pissed on and told that its raining. Do you really believe every detector manufacturer in the history of metal detecting has not tested every single frequency to try to find one that works well in salt water?? If it were as simple as "using 8khz" then a detector would have come along about 30 years ago and cornerd the market on beach detecting. Take off the Minelab glasses, take a step back and THINK.
 
I think the Xterra Pro is an amazing machine at an astronomical value. I do not believe the secret to its success is simply using 8khz, and I dont like to be pissed on and told that its raining. Do you really believe every detector manufacturer in the history of metal detecting has not tested every single frequency to try to find one that works well in salt water?? If it were as simple as "using 8khz" then a detector would have come along about 30 years ago and cornerd the market on beach detecting. Take off the Minelab glasses, take a step back and THINK.
NOBODY is saying that it's that simple! In fact, it's far more complicated than you're thinking....unless you're a world-class physicist and computer programmer. There are far more variables to all-digital metal detectors than just frequency selection, and in fact there are more than most people can even imagine.
For instance, did you know that ground balance on the Pro isn't the same as all other detectors? It accounts for and adjusts "Ground Phase Angle", a concept pioneered with the original Xterra line that wasn't incorporated into any other machine until the CTX3030. It is why on the original Xterras the lower the GB number the hotter the ground, which is opposite of all the old analog detectors.
The patented proprietary technology of Minelab's digital detectors is why the only authorized coils produced are either Minelab or Coiltek, and all others are inferior, reverse engineered by Ukrainian tech thieves.

Bottom line is that an all-digital detector has much more flexibility through programming than any analog machine ever dreamt of, even the majority of multi-freq units until just recently as the digital capabilities have proven themselves.
 
NOBODY is saying that it's that simple! In fact, it's far more complicated than you're thinking....unless you're a world-class physicist and computer programmer. There are far more variables to all-digital metal detectors than just frequency selection, and in fact there are more than most people can even imagine.
For instance, did you know that ground balance on the Pro isn't the same as all other detectors? It accounts for and adjusts "Ground Phase Angle", a concept pioneered with the original Xterra line that wasn't incorporated into any other machine until the CTX3030. It is why on the original Xterras the lower the GB number the hotter the ground, which is opposite of all the old analog detectors.
The patented proprietary technology of Minelab's digital detectors is why the only authorized coils produced are either Minelab or Coiltek, and all others are inferior, reverse engineered by Ukrainian tech thieves.

Bottom line is that an all-digital detector has much more flexibility through programming than any analog machine ever dreamt of, even the majority of multi-freq units until just recently as the digital capabilities have proven themselves.
Ok, I dont mind being called a "conspiracy theorist", because as with most of those things, given enough time the "conspiracy" will then be uncovered as "truth".
 
That list of frequencies is the frequencies the machine may radiate as a whole. Every electronic device has components that radiate radio waves. The internal clock for example that sets the operating frequency of all the electronics typically operates at multiples of what is finally transmitted.
Every electronic devices puts out many frequencies just running. And those must be kept below a threshold set by the FCC to not interfere with other devices. That's a list of all possible frequencies that a device radiates under normal operation.
What it transmits out the coil is different from what the machine's electronics operate at and radiate.

If you know someone with an oscilloscope.
Have them make a single loop of wire say 3" in diameter. Attach that to the scope. Now run your machines coil near that loop. And you will know exactly what frequencies it's transmitting. Period ...
 
Essentially what I tried to say.
Every electronic device radiates radio frequency Noise. That must be listed with the FCC and it's maximum power output in DB's.
FCC tests those devices and that noise to see if it is in compliance with their standards of interference.
Obviously the electronics in the Pro operate upto 143 KHz
 
Essentially what I tried to say.
Every electronic device radiates radio frequency Noise. That must be listed with the FCC and it's maximum power output in DB's.
FCC tests those devices and that noise to see if it is in compliance with their standards of interference.
Obviously the electronics in the Pro operate upto 143 KHz
Every one EXCEPT the KNOWN single frequency machine in this bunch, the go-find and its very narrow 7.4-8.2khz. Mmm hmmm, explain why the ONLY "other" single frequency machine in this bunch has such a Narrow range but all the Fbs and Multi Iq SMF machines have such a wide range and the Xterra Pro has that same wide range.
 
Every one EXCEPT the KNOWN single frequency machine in this bunch, the go-find and its very narrow 7.4-8.2khz. Mmm hmmm, explain why the ONLY "other" single frequency machine in this bunch has such a Narrow range but all the Fbs and Multi Iq SMF machines have such a wide range and the Xterra Pro has that same wide range.
To everyone NOT using a Go-Find........

1691703042660.gif
 
Every one EXCEPT the KNOWN single frequency machine in this bunch, the go-find and its very narrow 7.4-8.2khz. Mmm hmmm, explain why the ONLY "other" single frequency machine in this bunch has such a Narrow range but all the Fbs and Multi Iq SMF machines have such a wide range and the Xterra Pro has that same wide range.
Apparently it has Very clean circuitry.
Not make as much rfi noise.
And doesn't have many operating components.
In other words. It's cheaply made.
 
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