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Insect photography or macro photography

Old Longhair

Crazy Ol' Foole
Staff member
That one looks a lot like the one in my post. Mine didn't ave a red belly though.
That particular variety of snake is actually called a Red Bellied Snake.
They are seldom seen because they're so small. The one I'm holding is pretty close to as big as they get.
 

draco

Active member
Nice photos. I am also a fan of macro photography. I currently use a Nikon 2.8 40mm macro lens. It is very sharp and much cheaper than the 105. The only thing is that you have to get very close to the "object" But it is fantastic.
 

draco

Active member
_DSC8718.NEF.jpg
 

draco

Active member
Yes. In some situations I use flash with a diffuser that I made myself. It's very easy to do. In other situations, I use a focus rail and led light ring
 

draco

Active member
Whenever I can, I use sunlight, but on those occasions when the weather is bad to go outside, I do them at home. The animals, always alive. I don't like killing them to take a picture.
Here in my yard, with a spider and gear ready. Macro photography needs a lot of light.
_DSC0014_00001_01.jpg
 

draco

Active member
This diffuser is made with cardboard and a little imagination. Attaches to the flash and voila. You can use it both in the field and indoors, when there is little light.
 

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fyrffytr1

Active member
To the naked eye these little yellow things looked like seeds or mold spores. It wasn't until I downloaded and edited the pictures that I saw what they really were.
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Old Longhair

Crazy Ol' Foole
Staff member
I think they are the tiny peepers who get loud for there are many peeping at once! I could be wrong because there are so many noises in the night's darkness on a farm, even the rippling of water or the roaring of flood waters when our small cfeek became like a Mississippi River! :whistle: Ma
They are pretty loud, but other Peepers that are smaller and more plentiful account for the majority of the noise in the night. At least that's how it is here at my place (out in the boonies). Michigan is home to 14 species of frogs.
 

draco

Active member
We call them yellow aphids. (aphis nerii) They are quite bad for plants since they suck the sap and end up killing it.
 

draco

Active member
It seemed to me to see that the plant where the aphids are, they look like Asclepia curassavica. Nutritious plant of the monarch butterfly (Danaus plexippus)
 
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