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Mushrooms and Fungis

Smigo

Active member
Hi guys. I recently got a book I was after for yrs. Its edible things in our Bush, country, you can find.
In it I was surprised to see a mushroom fungis that I always, because I didn't know, thought was toxic. Apparently its not and is called Slippery Jack. It's not native here but was introduced by accident with pine trees. It now grows in pine tree areas here. I saw some several weeks ago before I got my book and thought "no way". But now I read they taste nice even though they look horrible. Just it says peel off the slimy skin and cook.
Has anyone there had them? My book says they are also in the USA.
Here it is.
IMG_20221209_175437_678~2.jpg
 

hawgdawg

Well-known member
I think I have seen them in my area as well ,, I'd love to be able to positively identify fungi . It just seems the pics in the books vary a little from whats in the field ,, and then I'm reluctant to try them . I'd hate to cook some up and get a bad belly ache and wake up dead .

What's the name of that book ?
Do you recommend it. ?
 

Smigo

Active member
I think I have seen them in my area as well ,, I'd love to be able to positively identify fungi . It just seems the pics in the books vary a little from whats in the field ,, and then I'm reluctant to try them . I'd hate to cook some up and get a bad belly ache and wake up dead .

What's the name of that book ?
Do you recommend it. ?
Hi yeah I know what you mean about seeing a picture and then actually trying them. Iv tried some of our native berries, im a bit nervous about some of the fungis though.
Id heard of this book ages ago and that it was good.
IMG_20221210_092630_992~2.jpg
 

hawgdawg

Well-known member
Aww ,, I didn't realize you are in Australia ,, it may not be completely acurate for us in the US . Some of it could be tho .
I'm going to start a little research and find a good reference book for my area ,,, if things get as bad as some are predicting,, we may be out in the woods hunting for food .
Thanks for giving me the kick in the pants to get going on this .
 

Smigo

Active member
Aww ,, I didn't realize you are in Australia ,, it may not be completely acurate for us in the US . Some of it could be tho .
I'm going to start a little research and find a good reference book for my area ,,, if things get as bad as some are predicting,, we may be out in the woods hunting for food .
Thanks for giving me the kick in the pants to get going on this .
Yep I had the same idea, needing to one day if it goes pear shaped forage for food 👍
 

vlad

Well-known member
Hi guys. I recently got a book I was after for yrs. Its edible things in our Bush, country, you can find.
In it I was surprised to see a mushroom fungis that I always, because I didn't know, thought was toxic. Apparently its not and is called Slippery Jack. It's not native here but was introduced by accident with pine trees. It now grows in pine tree areas here. I saw some several weeks ago before I got my book and thought "no way". But now I read they taste nice even though they look horrible. Just it says peel off the slimy skin and cook.
Has anyone there had them? My book says they are also in the USA.
Here it is. View attachment 33427
I hope your faith in the book is warranted. Ewell Gibbons was an expert advocate of nutritious plants out in the wild, and it has long been stated he ate a bad mushroom, and died.
 

Smigo

Active member
I hope your faith in the book is warranted. Ewell Gibbons was an expert advocate of nutritious plants out in the wild, and it has long been stated he ate a bad mushroom, and died.
Hi. I looked it up and he died from something else not eating a bad mushroom. He had some syndrome and died from an aneurism.
I do appreciate warnings to be careful though 👍
 

Odanscoils

Well-known member
Aww ,, I didn't realize you are in Australia ,, it may not be completely acurate for us in the US . Some of it could be tho .
I'm going to start a little research and find a good reference book for my area ,,, if things get as bad as some are predicting,, we may be out in the woods hunting for food .
Thanks for giving me the kick in the pants to get going on this .
Let us know what you find.
 
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