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Why detect open fields/forests?

Monkeys Uncle

Active member
I've never understood why some detectorist swing a detector in the woods and or open fields...AND actually find coins, etc.


My logic screams "hunt where people obviously were". NOW, over time I'm trying to grasp the logic of hunting were people "might" have been. Can someone enlighten me...PLEASE?
TIA!!

While I'm curious...ever wonder how much coinage (total $) we detectorist have placed back into the US money supply that the Fed doesn't know about?

I apologize, woke up with a curious mind this AM! We can all now go back to our naps.
 

earthlypotluck

Well-known member
Your questions can best be answered by viewing historical maps of your area / or visiting your local historical society. Those fields or wooded areas could of been a homestead, An old forgotten community, civil war battle / encampments, picnic grove, Fairgrounds etc
Good luck in your research!
 

fyrffytr1

Active member
I hunt open fields 99% of the time. Like has been said research is the key to finding the location. Once you find the general location ride the road beside the field in the early morning or late evening before the sun goes down and look for the glint of broken glass. That is where I start my hunt.
 

bootyhoundpa

Well-known member
In my area I ran into a guy who has been hunting for Indian arrowheads in farm fields for decades.. this guy gave me advise on a few fields he said he thought would be good for metal detecting..every place he told me to go paid off reale well... I would also suggest hunting areas near natural springs or any limited source of water as people and animals don’t live very long without water...
 

REVIER

Well-known member
I have no fields to hunt in my area but I definitely love to hit the woods when I find some which are usually in big parks.
In the winter, anyway, in the summer with mosquitos, chiggers and all the other insects is too much hassle.
I found that even if everywhere else is frozen the woods are usually still diggable because the wind can't get in there and freeze the place and the layer of leaves that most have protects the soil, keeps it warm and usually keeps any targets I find in pretty good shape...coins, jewelry and other things.
People have been roaming around woods for hundreds of years in some places, sometimes for pleasure like riding horses, camping and just walking because it was something to do way before tv was invented, radios, too, and kids always love to get into woods and play.
Below are just a few of my nicer finds I have found in a few different woods I have hunted.
Coins are cool, the old ones the coolest.
I once found two V nickels that were stuck together sitting INSIDE an old metal bottle cap, if you think that was a weird signal you are correct but in the woods ya gotta check things out because you just never know what might be hiding.
Also found some silver dimes, a few silver quarters and this 1919 merc that is in almost perfect condition...it looks way better in person than the pic shows.
Three things I love to find more than anything else besides old coins and jewelry are watch and clock parts, pocket knives and especially lighters.
Look at the lighters I have found in the woods, they range from an old, brass slip-wheel lighter to a Ronson model from I think the 40's to a Zippo you only could have gotten it you had enough miles in one of the Marlboro contests from the 90's up to a very modern cheap Ronson model you can still buy today.
Some nice silver jewelry, the ID bracelet is silver and found in the middle of nowhere and that old cap gun is in the best shape of any that I have ever found.
The Tootsie Toy car is huge, about 6" long and it was laying shallow hardly in the dirt and protected for years by a thick layer of leaves.
Plus more.

There is treasure hiding in the woods, you just have to get in there and look for it.
 

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jim tn

Well-known member
For most of us, hunting fields and woods is not some random "stop the car and start hunting thing." Some thought and perhaps research has gone into it.

We have a hugh old park in our city that has seen activity since the late 1800's. Many acres are wooded (thick woods/brush) with a few walking trails running throughout. It only stood to reason that people had ventured off the trails over the years so when I retired I started hunting the woods during the winter months when foliage was easier to swing through and over. Over the course of time I have recovered latterly hundreds of old coins, jewelry items and numerous other items of interest from it. Dug my 5th Morgan dollar, in fact, out of it this past winter. Think about such spots, you might get surprised. HH jim tn
 

HanoverDigger

Active member
90% of my hunting is in the woods and probably 90% of my coins finds are in the woods. For whatever reasons, the coins are there, I don't really give it that much though. It is what it is. I found a total of 12 Indian Head cents 1864-1902 in a 10 ft. square area. 5 mercs in a different spot, a 1776 2 reale in another spot...just to name a few. I've found numerous coins everywhere I hunt...mostly Civil War spots. Latest coin is an 1827 LC was found in a field.
 

Ronstar

Well-known member
If one goes to the county Historical Society and looks at old maps you notice a lot of early homes were at or near road intersections. Go look today and those homes are gone and usually just crop fields or grassy slopes. Farmers are likely to let you on if after harvest and they have disked the fields. Coins and other treasures just keep rotating up!!
 

bigtim1973

Active member
Most of the awesome stuff is found out in the wide open fields and woods. Especially if your a relic hunter. Look at gettsberg it too is just a big ass open field. But I can I only imagine just what's out there.


Same reason people search the beach....it is a wide open area too
 
In this area,S.E.Arkansas,In the 30,s through 50,s or so there was not as much mechanization and the machines were not as large or powerful as today.Farmers used lots of labor then.Most of these folks were not paid much in ready cash but lived on the fields in farm provided homes,were given a set amount of food or credit at local stores,fuel for heating and cooking,etc.You get the picture. The homes numbered in the hundreds.You can find them on older maps and they,re good detecting areas.Just big old open fields now but lots of history in the ground if you do the research plus around here the farmers are amenable to allowing you to detect.Don,t overlook fields.
 

hawgdawg

Well-known member
In this area,S.E.Arkansas,In the 30,s through 50,s or so there was not as much mechanization and the machines were not as large or powerful as today.Farmers used lots of labor then.Most of these folks were not paid much in ready cash but lived on the fields in farm provided homes,were given a set amount of food or credit at local stores,fuel for heating and cooking,etc.You get the picture. The homes numbered in the hundreds.You can find them on older maps and they,re good detecting areas.Just big old open fields now but lots of history in the ground if you do the research plus around here the farmers are amenable to allowing you to detect.Don,t overlook fields.
Yes sir,, this is true. My grandfather told of a time when he worked on a government farm,, said they let him live in a small shack of a house on a small piece of land, with a barn and a milk cow. Said the land was for him to grow his food , the cow was for milk, and they paid him 10 cents an hour to work the farm , 6 days a week. If i remember right, he said my Mom was born in that house,, that would have made it in 1940. I never did ask where that farm was ,, would be nice to detect around that area today.
 

still looking 52

Well-known member
Two good reasons to hunt the woods, first they get over looked by most people who detect because they think there isn't anything in there, second reason is there is no mowing of the grass which covers up old coins quickly. In the woods you can find really old coins that aren't that deep, like less than 6" deep.
I remember this one time my brother and myself were hunting this steep bank in the woods just above this tennis court, we decided we would take a break so we walked by the tennis courts to get back to the truck, this one guy hollers out you guys need to get down here where people actually lose stuff. Just so happens that day was the best silver day we've ever had, all in the woods.
 

Monkeys Uncle

Active member
Thanks to all. Do appreciate your input and will try the woods for a change. I just thought it would never pay off...thinking low to zero human traffic and how would I ever traverse the same path as the few persons who ventured there??? Again...THANKS! (y)

PS - to the poster who mentioned "chiggers" in the summer...try flea collars around the ankles.
 

Monkeys Uncle

Active member
Finally ventured into the woods adjacent to an old (late 1800's) city park. Had some issues with thorns and swinging my coil among the multitude of limbs...BUT did find some coins (zinclons and one wheatie). Thought I had a deep quarter but it turned out to be a pc of barbed wire (darn rust). I will return and will do more research for old homesites rotting away "in the nether lands". (y)
 
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